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Grenada

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NEWS
September 26, 1986 | By JANE ABRAMS, New York Daily News
"No problem" is the unofficial slogan for the little Caribbean island of Grenada. It reflects the casual local attitude and means that visitors shouldn't worry about a thing. "No Problem" is even the name of a fast-foods restaurant on the campus of the local medical school that fronts on part of glorious Grand Anse Beach. But there were problems - plenty of them - here in October of 1983 when some 200 American students were trapped at the school as Grenadian and Cuban troops resisted a wave of American helicopters bearing soldiers sent to liberate the island.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Stamps Writer
The West Indies island nation of Grenada has removed former baseball star Pete Rose from its stamps. The action was taken at the request of major league baseball, which has banned Rose from the sport for betting on baseball games. In 1988, Rose and 80 other present and former baseball stars were depicted on Grenada stamps that were issued in sheetlets. Each sheetlet has nine 30- cent stamps of different players. The Cincinnati Reds and major league baseball logos also were included in the design with Rose.
NEWS
October 18, 1986 | By Mark Kurlansky
Seldom has an invader ever had a better reception than U.S. troops received after they landed in the tiny island nation of Grenada three years ago on Oct. 23. The popular leftist Grenadian leader Maurice Bishop had been murdered four days earlier in a coup d'etat and Grenadians were ready to start a new era. If that meant abandoning some of the well-appreciated programs of the left for a new regime of laissez-faire American capitalism they were...
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By Ewart Rouse, Inquirer Staff Writer
I had just spent my first night in Grenada, and it wasn't exactly what I envisioned. I had forked over $562 to a Philadelphia travel agent for a package that consisted of air fare and a five-day, four-night stay at the Flamboyant Cottages. The travel agent had described the nine-cottage resort as situated on a breezy hillside overlooking the sun-bleached sands and crystal-clear waters of Grand Anse Beach and providing a breathtaking view of the harbor of St. George's, the capital, three miles away.
NEWS
February 21, 1986 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Hailed by thousands of flag-waving Grenadians as their liberator, President Reagan responded yesterday by saying that "we won't be satisfied until all the people of the Americas have joined us in the warm sunshine of liberty and justice. " In his first state visit here since American troops landed in October 1983 and toppled a Marxist government, Reagan laid a wreath for the 19 Americans killed in the invasion, talked up the virtues of free enterprise, and criticized Nicaragua and Cuba as governments of tyranny.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
George Brizan, 69, a former prime minister who was a founder of Grenada's ruling party, has died in his Caribbean homeland. Prime Minister Tillman Thomas said Mr. Brizan died Saturday at a hospital in the capital of St. George's after a long battle with diabetes. Mr. Brizan became prime minister in February 1995 after Prime Minister Nicholas Braithwaite resigned. But his National Democratic Congress party was swept from power four months later. The party, which was elected on a no-tax platform in 1990, had angered voters by bringing back personal income taxes and imposing tight economic measures to offset huge foreign debts, cuts in U.S. aid, and reduced agriculture income.
NEWS
February 23, 1986 | By George C. Wilson and Michael Weisskoph, Washington Post
The invasion of Grenada 27 months ago achieved its objectives of freeing American students with little loss of life or damage to the island but exposed shortcomings in the U.S. military that must be corrected if the United States is to operate successfully in "low-intensity" third-world conflicts. This is a widely held view among professional military officers familiar with the Grenada foulups and among lawmakers who are drafting legislation designed to centralize military responsibility and clear away some of the underbrush standing between Washington and the commander on the scene in remote military operations.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Say this for Steven Dietz's Halcyon Days, the political comedy that runs through Nov. 1 at the Wilma Theater: It may be as neatly packaged and free of irrelevance as your typical appropriations bill, but it's often on the mark about the ways of power and influence in the citadel of democracy called Washington, D.C. It understands, for instance, the city's penchant for casting the most cynical and self-serving behavior as if it were part of...
SPORTS
July 5, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The United States returned home from the FIFA Confederations Cup and routed Grenada, 4-0, with a young lineup last night in Seattle as it opened its title defense in the CONCACAF Gold Cup, the regional championship of North and Central America and the Caribbean. Freddy Adu scored the first goal in the seventh minute, and Stuart Holden doubled the lead in the 31st, both on feeds from Robbie Rogers. Earlier, Carlo Costly headed in a free kick by Walter Martinez in the 76th minute, helping Honduras open group play with a 1-0 win over Haiti.
NEWS
August 10, 1998 | By Morris Thompson
Calvin Trillin once cautioned his fellow journalists not to inquire too deeply into certain tales: The way you hear them first is best. He cited a patently untrue rumor that Nancy Reagan was once known as "Bubbles" and was a regular at what became Chicago's Playboy Mansion. Cuban President Fidel Castro's recent visit to Grenada, that tiny Caribbean island-nation we "rescued" in 1983, reminded me of that instance of U.S. presidents counting on Americans remembering things the way they heard them the first time and not inquiring too deeply.
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NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
MORE GOD in the lives of urban American families may be the answer to their struggles to attain a better life, a Philadelphia-based pastor told a small audience at the World Meeting of Families yesterday. "If we get people praying again, our society will become better," said the Rev. Terrence Griffith, the pastor of the 205-year-old First African Baptist Church, the oldest African-American Baptist Church in the state. "If we want to heal our urban society, God must return. If we invite God to come and sit with us, then the place will become better," Griffith told an audience of about 100. Griffith, a native of Grenada who has lived in Philadelphia for 27 years, spoke at the workshop "Concerns of the Urban Family" where he addressed the effect and impact of an array of issues urban families face.
TRAVEL
April 14, 2014 | By Sean Carney, For The Inquirer
It was December 2013 when my plane dropped from the sky. We collectively clenched, wondering if our seat cushions really floated, and slammed down onto what I hoped was the runway. The pilot's voice filled the cabin. "We made it!" The woman next to me squeezed my hand and I thought, "Were we not supposed to?" When we passed several goats penned alongside the runway, I realized this was just how one landed on the tiny island of Grenada. Grenada is in the southeastern Caribbean Sea, about 90 miles off the coast of Venezuela.
NEWS
October 31, 2013
Don lab coats By visiting a University of Pennsylvania research facility last week, Sen. Bob Casey (D., Pa.) underscored his commitment to making research and innovation an immutable national priority ("Scientists reeling from budget cuts," Oct. 24). Adequately supported, research will allow us to overcome major health threats and drive the economy. Americans have taken notice that research support is waning and, in addition, say they are concerned that officials in Washington are not paying enough attention to deadly diseases, polling done for our nonprofit advocacy alliance, Research!
NEWS
July 17, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN OLIVER NORTH needed funds ostensibly for a Nicaraguan church during the infamous Iran-Contra scandal of the mid-'80s, he enlisted the help of a Philadelphia stockbroker. The stockbroker, Jonathan J. Hirtle, contacted two Philadelphia-area business executives, Donald E. Meads, former chairman of CertainTeed Corp., and James Macaleer, CEO of Shared Medical Systems of Malvern, to meet with North. As a result of that meeting in Washington, D.C., in August 1985, one of the executives donated $60,000 for North's activities.
NEWS
February 20, 2012
George Brizan, 69, a former prime minister who was a founder of Grenada's ruling party, has died in his Caribbean homeland. Prime Minister Tillman Thomas said Mr. Brizan died Saturday at a hospital in the capital of St. George's after a long battle with diabetes. Mr. Brizan became prime minister in February 1995 after Prime Minister Nicholas Braithwaite resigned. But his National Democratic Congress party was swept from power four months later. The party, which was elected on a no-tax platform in 1990, had angered voters by bringing back personal income taxes and imposing tight economic measures to offset huge foreign debts, cuts in U.S. aid, and reduced agriculture income.
NEWS
October 14, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
TALK ABOUT love deferred. Eugene George met a lovely girl named Muriel Daly while attending school in Grenada in the West Indies. Romance bloomed. But fate intervened. Eugene and his brother, Andrew, went off to spend a couple of years in Trinidad, and then Eugene, a native Philadelphian, was drafted into the Army in World War II. After his discharge in 1947, he returned to Philadelphia. He settled in with his parents, but he didn't forget Muriel. In 1949, he sent for her, and they were married within a year.
SPORTS
July 5, 2009 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The United States returned home from the FIFA Confederations Cup and routed Grenada, 4-0, with a young lineup last night in Seattle as it opened its title defense in the CONCACAF Gold Cup, the regional championship of North and Central America and the Caribbean. Freddy Adu scored the first goal in the seventh minute, and Stuart Holden doubled the lead in the 31st, both on feeds from Robbie Rogers. Earlier, Carlo Costly headed in a free kick by Walter Martinez in the 76th minute, helping Honduras open group play with a 1-0 win over Haiti.
NEWS
November 14, 2004 | By Theresa Gawlas Medoff FOR THE INQUIRER
When I heard the news on the radio, I pulled over to the side of the road and sobbed. Hurricane Ivan had ripped across the lush, mountainous Caribbean island of Grenada, destroying homes, schools, the parliament building, and the nation's only hospital. I tried to imagine the devastation: 90 percent of buildings damaged or destroyed, the people homeless, the economy in tatters. At home later, I compared my vacation photos of the island's colorful harbor with the harbor I saw in news photos - strewn with a jumble of wrecked boats, twisted metal and splintered wood torn from waterfront buildings.
SPORTS
July 8, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The United States advanced to an all-time high No. 7 in FIFA's rankings yesterday while Greece jumped 21 spots to No. 14 after its dazzling run to the European Championship title. Brazil remained No. 1 for the 25th straight month, and France and Spain stayed at second and third. The United States twice had climbed as high as eighth - in September 2002 and again in May. The Americans beat Grenada in a home-and-home series in June to reach the semifinals of World Cup qualifying in its region.
SPORTS
April 1, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
The United States tuned up for World Cup qualifying by beating Poland, 1-0, in an exhibition game yesterday in Plock, Poland. DaMarcus Beasley's goal ended the hosts' seven-game winning streak. Goalkeeper Brad Friedel had a shutout in his first national team game in nearly 2 years for the United States, which lost to Poland, 3-1, in the first round of the 2002 World Cup. The Americans went on to reach the quarterfinals of that tournament. Coach Bruce Arena started seven European-based players, including Friedel, who plays for Blackburn in the English Premier League.
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