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FOOD
November 16, 1988 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
If you've ever nuked a casserole or roasted a Thanksgiving turkey with plastic-bagged giblets inside, take heart from the tale Michael Mayfield tells on himself. Mayfield, the boss with the Dijon sauce at Fireworks in the Reading Terminal, once hosted a party for 53 people at his Lansdowne apartment - and couldn't get the charcoal grill started. "People were looking at me, like, 'You do what for a living?"' Mayfield recalled humbly. See, it happens to everybody. The grill eventually did start, and Mayfield dished up the same chicken and Brie sandwiches, Italian sausage and thick sirloin burgers that Fireworks serves to as many as 175 customers every day. The ever-cheerful Mayfield, 29, grills at home only when he's entertaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008
Q: I would like to try to grill fish whole. I've heard it is pretty easy, but I have never done it before and I'm a little nervous. Do you have a foolproof method or recipe for cooking whole fish? Regards. - Harry S. A: The good news for you, Harry, is that when you grill fish you are in control, and it truly is very easy. Some people may wonder, why bother to cook a whole fish? We do it for the same reason that we cook a whole chicken or any other piece of meat on the bone; the final product is much juicier and more flavorful.
FOOD
September 28, 1988 | By Sam Gugino, Daily News Restaurant Critic
What would we have done in this summer of our discontent without the outdoor grill? And because we've expanded our barbecuing horizons in recent years, we can cook with enough variety on the grill to keep us out of the oven until at least World Series time. The Express Check-Out Diner bought his usual 10 items (actually a few less). I used sesame seeds, soy sauce and sherry from my pantry and whizzed through the local Super Fresh in a mere 17 minutes. Two large chicken breasts ($5.08)
FOOD
May 26, 2011 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
Once upon a time, most food was thrown on the grill naked and served unadorned. Unbelievable, I know, but true. Now, of course, "building" or "layering" flavor with marinades, rubs, brines, smoke, sauces, chutneys, and more is where it's at, even for home cooks. But how much is too much? Are there rules that will decrease the number of times this grilling season that you will have to order pizza because of the misapplication of enhancements to expensive cuts of beef? With Memorial Day and grilling season upon us, there's nobody better to answer such pressing questions than two Philadelphia-area food professionals, Andrew Schloss and David Joachim.
FOOD
July 27, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
From the authors of Fish on the Grill (Contemporary Books), a popular cookbook of two summers ago, comes this season's logical sequel: Shellfish on the Grill (Contemporary Books, $7.95). For this sea adventure, food writers Phyllis Magida and Barbara Grunes again have joined in preparing a straightforward, sensible and easy-to-follow guide to preparing everything from barnacles (a growing West Coast trend) to squid. Magida and Grunes have included recipes for the imitation crab and lobster products that are becoming increasingly available in supermarkets.
FOOD
February 21, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I have this great idea for a TV sitcom. There's this handsome ex-mayor of a big old East Coast city, and he fancies he'd like to own an old-fashioned bar and grill. He finds one in a section of town that's rapidly moving from shabby to chic, and he spruces it up. One night a local restaurant critic slips in, unnoticed. Hizzoner smiles at her, and she thinks she's been spotted. But no, he's a politician, remember, and these guys smile at everything that moves. So she relaxes, eats her dinner, pays the check and gets ready to leave when someone tells the manager that she's The Critic, and suddenly the place is buzzing.
FOOD
August 22, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
One of summer's greatest culinary pleasures is food cooked on a grill, with backyard flames enhancing flavors like nothing else. But fire and hot coals can transform so much more than just burgers and dogs. Almost all the produce bursting from local farms and gardens can be cooked outside - creating flavorful fare from appetizers through desserts. Grilled whole, sliced, layered or wrapped, almost every vegetable and many fruits can be converted into tasty fare on a barbecue grill.
FOOD
July 12, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Food writers Phyllis Magida and Barbara Grunes - with two successful fish cookbooks of summers past already to their credit - have teamed up once again to write Gourmet Fish on the Grill (Contemporary Books, $8.95). This summer's paperback, which features more than 90 recipes designed for entertaining, is an extension of their two earlier efforts, Fish on the Grill and Shellfish on the Grill (both also published by Contemporary Books). As were the others, this is a practical approach to grilling fish.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
An excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " I have long wished for a good marinade for chicken on the grill. My requirements: that it be not too sweet, not too gloppy, not too complicated, not too expensive. I wanted a flavor profile that would appeal to adults and children, that could easily be expanded to feed a crowd, and would be an easy go-to, that could be thrown together with little effort, with ingredients already in the pantry. With this recipe, from Nina Simonds new cookbook, Simple Asian Meals , I have found the winner.
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NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Confronted repeatedly by his own laughter and voice discussing trial strategy with his girlfriend on recorded prison phone calls, Bucks County exterminator Jason Smith struggled Tuesday to rebut a prosecutor's claim that he killed pediatrician Melissa Ketunuti and burned her body. Smith, 39, of Levittown, shifted uneasily on the witness stand as Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Selber played a recording of his March 20, 2013, telephone call with Shannon Mooney, the mother of his then-4-year-old daughter.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams jokingly promised extended recess and summer break. Nelson A. Diaz name-checked notable Philadelphia School District grad Questlove - though he called him Love Quest. And James F. Kenney told those in the audience he loved them very much. Five of the six Democratic mayoral candidates took the stage for a very different type of forum Monday: The questioners were fourth and fifth graders from district schools around the city. The event was sponsored by the Rendell Center for Civics and Civic Engagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2015 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
No professionals are forced to bear witness to more mind-numbingly bad dates than bartenders, making them uniquely qualified to comment on the singles scene. Now that it's put-yourself-out-there, spring-fling season, online dating tools like Tinder, Match.com, and OkCupid will be flooded with activity from new users and from dating vets returning after a long, cold hiatus. Bartenders see everything that happens - even if they don't want to. "It's like watching a movie, and there's that awkward moment where you're like, 'I don't want to watch!
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homicide detectives on Friday were pursuing leads in the stabbing death a Bronx man who worked for Nicki Minaj and was killed outside an East Germantown bar early Wednesday morning. De'Von Pickett, 29, succumbed to multiple stab wounds after an altercation that sources said he had attempted to defuse outside the Che Bar and Grill, 6364 Stenton Ave. Police were looking for three men who they said started at fight outside the bar with Pickett and several companions. One of Pickett's companions, a 27-year-old coworker, was seriously wounded in the fight, and was recovering at Einstein Medical Center.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - When he started working on defense issues, Ashton Carter said Wednesday, there was just one big worry: the Cold War and its threat of nuclear disaster. "Those were the good old days," said Sen. James M. Inhofe (R., Okla.). Now, as Carter stands poised to become the civilian head of the U.S. military, the Abington High School graduate faces a much more complex tangle. "We are in a time where the number and severity of risks is not something I've seen before in my life," Carter said during the first hearing on his nomination to become secretary of defense.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he was fired from his $240,000-a-year job at Fox29, Don Tollefson was living off his wife's income and disability payments related to a car crash. But two infusions of cash soon came his way. The first was a $333,000 out-of-court settlement in the car accident. When that dried up, he cracked open his $400,000 pension from Fox, Tollefson testified Friday. All the money was gone in less than four years. "I'm proud to say I spent it on the kids," Tollefson told jurors on the ninth day of his fraud trial.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
DON TOLLEFSON took a bruising under cross-examination yesterday from the district attorney who had been champing at the bit to get to him. On the eighth day of his charity-fraud trial, the former Philly TV sportscaster underwent a stinging inquisition by Bucks County Chief Prosecutor Matt Weintraub, who got Tollefson to admit that money was transferred from his Winning Ways charity Bank of America account to his personal PNC bank account on many...
FOOD
November 27, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'So why aren't we making real grilled cheese?" said chef Marc Vetri, who was visiting our after-school cooking class. "Well, we're going for something healthier," I said. Baked whole-wheat pitas stuffed with cheese and homemade tomato soup - a reinvention of the classic pairing. "You think these are healthy?" he said, grabbing the pitas and reading off the offensive ingredients: preservatives, enzymes, gluten. "So, what kind of bread should I buy in a grocery store?
REAL_ESTATE
October 19, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cara Schneider Bongiorno and her husband, Charles Bongiorno, a physician, are true Philadelphians: They've made the most of their 20-by-12-foot concrete back yard by converting it into a graceful garden and May-through-November party space with seating. Many city residents rely on a concrete pad behind their homes to serve as their "outdoors. " The Bongiornos were determined to bring true green to their space and to decorate it in a way that would be inviting for a barbecue with friends, a glass of wine in the evenings after work, or just a quiet refuge.
FOOD
August 22, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
One of summer's greatest culinary pleasures is food cooked on a grill, with backyard flames enhancing flavors like nothing else. But fire and hot coals can transform so much more than just burgers and dogs. Almost all the produce bursting from local farms and gardens can be cooked outside - creating flavorful fare from appetizers through desserts. Grilled whole, sliced, layered or wrapped, almost every vegetable and many fruits can be converted into tasty fare on a barbecue grill.
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