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FOOD
November 16, 1988 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
If you've ever nuked a casserole or roasted a Thanksgiving turkey with plastic-bagged giblets inside, take heart from the tale Michael Mayfield tells on himself. Mayfield, the boss with the Dijon sauce at Fireworks in the Reading Terminal, once hosted a party for 53 people at his Lansdowne apartment - and couldn't get the charcoal grill started. "People were looking at me, like, 'You do what for a living?"' Mayfield recalled humbly. See, it happens to everybody. The grill eventually did start, and Mayfield dished up the same chicken and Brie sandwiches, Italian sausage and thick sirloin burgers that Fireworks serves to as many as 175 customers every day. The ever-cheerful Mayfield, 29, grills at home only when he's entertaining.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008
Q: I would like to try to grill fish whole. I've heard it is pretty easy, but I have never done it before and I'm a little nervous. Do you have a foolproof method or recipe for cooking whole fish? Regards. - Harry S. A: The good news for you, Harry, is that when you grill fish you are in control, and it truly is very easy. Some people may wonder, why bother to cook a whole fish? We do it for the same reason that we cook a whole chicken or any other piece of meat on the bone; the final product is much juicier and more flavorful.
FOOD
September 28, 1988 | By Sam Gugino, Daily News Restaurant Critic
What would we have done in this summer of our discontent without the outdoor grill? And because we've expanded our barbecuing horizons in recent years, we can cook with enough variety on the grill to keep us out of the oven until at least World Series time. The Express Check-Out Diner bought his usual 10 items (actually a few less). I used sesame seeds, soy sauce and sherry from my pantry and whizzed through the local Super Fresh in a mere 17 minutes. Two large chicken breasts ($5.08)
FOOD
May 26, 2011 | By Joyce Gemperlein, For The Inquirer
Once upon a time, most food was thrown on the grill naked and served unadorned. Unbelievable, I know, but true. Now, of course, "building" or "layering" flavor with marinades, rubs, brines, smoke, sauces, chutneys, and more is where it's at, even for home cooks. But how much is too much? Are there rules that will decrease the number of times this grilling season that you will have to order pizza because of the misapplication of enhancements to expensive cuts of beef? With Memorial Day and grilling season upon us, there's nobody better to answer such pressing questions than two Philadelphia-area food professionals, Andrew Schloss and David Joachim.
FOOD
July 27, 1988 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
From the authors of Fish on the Grill (Contemporary Books), a popular cookbook of two summers ago, comes this season's logical sequel: Shellfish on the Grill (Contemporary Books, $7.95). For this sea adventure, food writers Phyllis Magida and Barbara Grunes again have joined in preparing a straightforward, sensible and easy-to-follow guide to preparing everything from barnacles (a growing West Coast trend) to squid. Magida and Grunes have included recipes for the imitation crab and lobster products that are becoming increasingly available in supermarkets.
FOOD
February 21, 1988 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I have this great idea for a TV sitcom. There's this handsome ex-mayor of a big old East Coast city, and he fancies he'd like to own an old-fashioned bar and grill. He finds one in a section of town that's rapidly moving from shabby to chic, and he spruces it up. One night a local restaurant critic slips in, unnoticed. Hizzoner smiles at her, and she thinks she's been spotted. But no, he's a politician, remember, and these guys smile at everything that moves. So she relaxes, eats her dinner, pays the check and gets ready to leave when someone tells the manager that she's The Critic, and suddenly the place is buzzing.
FOOD
August 22, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
One of summer's greatest culinary pleasures is food cooked on a grill, with backyard flames enhancing flavors like nothing else. But fire and hot coals can transform so much more than just burgers and dogs. Almost all the produce bursting from local farms and gardens can be cooked outside - creating flavorful fare from appetizers through desserts. Grilled whole, sliced, layered or wrapped, almost every vegetable and many fruits can be converted into tasty fare on a barbecue grill.
FOOD
July 12, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Food writers Phyllis Magida and Barbara Grunes - with two successful fish cookbooks of summers past already to their credit - have teamed up once again to write Gourmet Fish on the Grill (Contemporary Books, $8.95). This summer's paperback, which features more than 90 recipes designed for entertaining, is an extension of their two earlier efforts, Fish on the Grill and Shellfish on the Grill (both also published by Contemporary Books). As were the others, this is a practical approach to grilling fish.
FOOD
July 8, 2010 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
This light dish, from Williams-Sonoma's Cooking From the Farmers' Market , is a perfect summer supper on the grill. It's quick and easy enough for a weeknight, yet elegant enough for company.   Grilled Black Cod With Cucumbers and Ginger 1. Prepare a grill for direct grilling over high heat, or use a stovetop grill pan. Oil the grill rack. 2. In a bowl, combine the cucumbers and onion and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt. Let stand for 15 mintues. Stir in the ginger, vinegar, and 2 tablespoons of the canola oil. Set aside.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 17, 2016
1. Set up the grill with both high- and low-heat areas. That allows you to move food away from flare-ups; sear thicker meats over high heat, then finish them over low heat without burning; and cook different types of foods at once, such as steaks over high heat and asparagus over low heat. 2. For instant flavor, use a spice rub instead of a marinade or brine. You eat all of the seasonings in a rub, but throw most of them away in a marinade or brine. 3. For smoke flavor, add wood chunks or chips to the coolest part of the fire, but skip soaking them in water - wood doesn't absorb much, and the water has to evaporate before the wood starts to smoke.
FOOD
June 17, 2016 | By Beth D'Addono, For The Inquirer
Like so many dads, Dave Joachim loves to play with fire. "I'm a pyro at heart," said the Emmaus resident, who also happens to be a wizard at the grill. Joachim, who has written, edited, or collaborated on more than 40 cookbooks, specializes in the science of grilling, a talent that's evident in Williams-Sonoma Grill School (Weldon Owen, $18.60), the new primer he cowrote with Elkins Park food writer Andrew Schloss. "This is our third book together," said Joachim, who is a drummer in the band Tavern Tan when he's not firing up the barbie.
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 4 servings 12 slices bacon 24 large sea scallops, tendons removed 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 2 lemons, halved 1/4 cup chopped fresh chives 1. Place 4 layers of paper towels on large plate, and arrange 6 slices of bacon over towels in single layer. Top with 4 more paper towels and remaining 6 slices bacon. Cover with 2 layers of paper towels; place second large plate on top and press gently to flatten.
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 4 servings For the tenderloin: 1/3 cup soy sauce (or lower-sodium soy sauce) 1/3 cup packed light brown sugar 2 tablespoons sesame oil 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1 tablespoon dry mustard 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper 2 whole pork tenderloins (1 to 2 pounds total) For watermelon salad: 4 cups watermelon, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoons red wine vinegar 1/2 medium sweet onion, diced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint leaves Sea salt 1. To prepare the tenderloins, place all the marinade ingredients in a bowl, and whisk until the sugar is dissolved.
FOOD
June 16, 2016
Makes 6-8 servings 1 tablespoon butter, melted 5 peaches, cut in half and pitted 3 cups water 1/8 teaspoon salt 2 cups sugar, divided 1 cup self-rising flour 3/4 cup milk 1. Set up a grill for indirect heat to cook at 350. Lightly butter the cut side of the peaches, then place them, cut side down, on the hot side of the grill. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, until the peaches begin to soften and have nice grill marks. Remove the peaches, cool for a minute, then peel, and cut into 1-inch cubes.
FOOD
June 9, 2016
Makes 2 servings 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus extra as needed 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus extra as needed 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon each: fresh chives, fresh mint leaves, chopped 8 small to medium asparagus spears (see Notes), trimmed 2 teaspoons vegetable oil 2 large eggs 2 teaspoons unsalted butter 4 slices (1/2 inch each)
FOOD
April 8, 2016
Makes 2 servings as an appetizer 6 very thin slices of excellent-quality country ham (3 slices per person) 4 1/2-inch slices of ripe melon (2 slices per person), whichever variety is of the best quality at the time Handful of mint leaves Very good-quality extra virgin olive oil Freshly ground pepper 1. Preheat your grill for 10 minutes at the highest temperature. 2. Coat the melon slices with a small amount of the olive oil and grill briefly on both sides.
FOOD
April 1, 2016
4 servings 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided 11/3 cup pearl couscous (also known as Israeli or Middle Eastern couscous) 13/4 cup water 1 large lemon, zest and juice 1 clove garlic, finely chopped Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 lamb Merguez or other lamb sausage links 2 yellow bell peppers, seeded and quartered 2 red bell peppers, seeded and quartered 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat.
FOOD
February 26, 2016
Serves 6 to 8 1/2 cup fine bulgur 1 cup shelled pistachios 1 bunch scallions, thinly sliced 2 small sweet onions, one finely diced, the other sliced thinly 6 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 bunch parsley, chopped 1/2 bunch spearmint, chopped 2 tablespoons Baharat 2 tablespoons paprika 2 teaspoons hot red pepper flakes 2 pounds finely ground lamb Sea salt, pepper to taste Olive oil, for brushing ...
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | Drew Lazor, Daily News Staff Writer
DAMON Menapace, of Kensington Quarters, offers two recipes for "quick and simple sandwiches that I am often snacking on at the restaurant and at home. " OPEN-FACE HEAD CHEESE SANDWICH 1 slice sourdough bread Mayonnaise Coleslaw (recipe below) 3 slices head cheese Grill or toast bread, spread with mayo. Add headcheese and top with coleslaw (recipe below). Serves one. COLESLAW 1 cup thin sliced green cabbage 1/4 cup shredded carrot 1 tablespoon minced onion 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 2 teaspoons sugar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon salt Mix all ingredients together.
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