CollectionsGrindhouse
IN THE NEWS

Grindhouse

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The National Association of Theatre Owners would beg to differ, but it's still possible in a few multiplexes across the land to "enjoy" the grindhouse experience. You know, a theater with floors glazed in Coke and rotten Raisinets, upholstered seats you don't want to see with the lights up, a couple of drunks down in front providing running commentary, and maybe a guy in military camouflage with a bulging duffel bag, grunting to himself one aisle over. "Admittedly, that was never the best part of it," says director Quentin Tarantino, waxing nostalgic about the days decades back when he'd venture into some grungy one-screen in downtown L.A. to see a cheapo vigilante flick or a babes-behind-bars thriller.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
When Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez set out to make "Grindhouse," the double feature that honors the exploitation movies of the 1960s and 1970s, they had no idea which of their films would go first when the final three-hour project hit theaters. "Early on we said let's just go alphabetical and have the theater owners decide," Rodriguez said, with the understanding that his film, "Planet Terror," would lead the bill in Texas and Tarantino's "Death Proof" would topline in his home base of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In "Grindhouse," there are many violent crescendos, but one stands out: a one-legged woman with a machine-gun prosthesis mowing down a horde of men. If you like moviegoing, you're going to like this scene. Unless you're Paul McCartney, for whom this is probably some kind of recurring nightmare. Note, however, the emphasis on "moviegoing. " "Grindhouse" isn't for the Netflix cineaste, eager to watch "Babel" on Blu-ray disc in hi-def with surround sound. It's about being there.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
By all rights, even gore hounds should be perturbed by the sheer level of gut-churning mayhem, sexual depravity, tasteless slapstick humor - and gallons of blood - hurled at the screen in Robert Rodriguez's post-cheez-ee retro grindhouse spectacle, Machete . Any college sophomore would find its less-than-subtle political message about the plight of Mexican immigrants in today's America so naive that it borders on the inane. But Machete , which stars Danny Trejo as Machete, a machete-wielding former Mexican cop who wreaks havoc on the men who killed his family, is, simply put, lovely.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The National Association of Theatre Owners would beg to differ, but it's still possible in a few multiplexes across the land to "enjoy" the grindhouse experience. You know, a theater with floors glazed in Coke and rotten Raisinets, upholstered seats you don't want to see with the lights up, a couple of drunks down in front providing running commentary, and maybe a guy in military camouflage with a bulging duffel bag, grunting to himself one aisle over. "Admittedly, that was never the best part of it," says director Quentin Tarantino, waxing nostalgic about the days decades back when he'd venture into some grungy one-screen in downtown L.A. to see a cheapo vigilante flick or a babes-behind-bars thriller.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Grindhouse is the generic name for exploitation flicks and the disreputable theaters that showed them.Some called them degraded films in degraded environments. Others called them a blast. These omnipotent fantasies for the powerless provided a junk-food high in the junkiest imaginable of settings. America's most gifted filmmakers got their starts with such zombie mashups, death races and soft-core porn. David Cronenberg's They Came From Within . Steven Spielberg's Duel . Jonathan Demme's Caged Heat . Martin Scorsese's Boxcar Bertha was that unusual grindhouse hybrid, a soft-core/religio/protest pic. It's two, two, two flicks in one, with a running time of over three hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2010
"Machete" was the most memorable, really fun and super-violent trailer that ran between the "Grindhouse" double feature. Now - because you demanded it - filmmaker Robert Rodriguez has turned those 90 seconds of quick cuts and best-of moments into a full-length movie. And by "you," I mean everyone who goes to Comic-Con every year; the same niche crowd of 20,000 who heralded the cinematic success of "Snakes on a Plane" and "Scott Pilgrim. " People who make our movies (and that includes the movie stars, like Robert De Niro, who sign on for cameos)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
YOU CAN LOOK at the average languid, nonlinear twenty-something mumblecore relationship movie and think: It's missing something. Flamethrowers? That's the added spicy ingredient in "Bellflower," a low-low-budget indie about a couple of guys (Evan Glodell, Tyler Dawson) who, in their spare time (which seems like all they have), build a homemade flamethrower and try to hook up with girls. This mixture becomes combustible when one of the guys gets a serious girlfriend (Jesse Wiseman)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
If you think there's nothing new to add to the immigration debate, you have not seen "Machete. " I don't think Robert Rodriguez's movie advances the dialogue very much (in fact, it probably moves it back a peg or two), but it does have something to add - the naked bodies of Jessica Alba and Lindsay Lohan, and the virtually nude figure of Michelle Rodriguez. And it does raise some interesting questions. None connected with immigration, but interesting nonetheless. Where does a naked woman keep her cell phone?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
There's a fine line between a movie that's so bad it's good, and one that's patently ridiculous but undeniably entertaining. The Man With the Iron Fists , the grindhouse exploitation filmed-in-China chop-socky directorial debut of the RZA, the producer and guiding guru of the martial arts-inspired hip-hop crew the Wu Tang Clan, falls into the latter category. It's a period-piece kung-fu flick concerning rival clans spilling blood in pursuit of a big pile of gold that's being transported to a charmingly sinful Chinese hamlet known as Jungle Village.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011 | BY GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
YOU CAN LOOK at the average languid, nonlinear twenty-something mumblecore relationship movie and think: It's missing something. Flamethrowers? That's the added spicy ingredient in "Bellflower," a low-low-budget indie about a couple of guys (Evan Glodell, Tyler Dawson) who, in their spare time (which seems like all they have), build a homemade flamethrower and try to hook up with girls. This mixture becomes combustible when one of the guys gets a serious girlfriend (Jesse Wiseman)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
If you think there's nothing new to add to the immigration debate, you have not seen "Machete. " I don't think Robert Rodriguez's movie advances the dialogue very much (in fact, it probably moves it back a peg or two), but it does have something to add - the naked bodies of Jessica Alba and Lindsay Lohan, and the virtually nude figure of Michelle Rodriguez. And it does raise some interesting questions. None connected with immigration, but interesting nonetheless. Where does a naked woman keep her cell phone?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
By all rights, even gore hounds should be perturbed by the sheer level of gut-churning mayhem, sexual depravity, tasteless slapstick humor - and gallons of blood - hurled at the screen in Robert Rodriguez's post-cheez-ee retro grindhouse spectacle, Machete . Any college sophomore would find its less-than-subtle political message about the plight of Mexican immigrants in today's America so naive that it borders on the inane. But Machete , which stars Danny Trejo as Machete, a machete-wielding former Mexican cop who wreaks havoc on the men who killed his family, is, simply put, lovely.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2010
"Machete" was the most memorable, really fun and super-violent trailer that ran between the "Grindhouse" double feature. Now - because you demanded it - filmmaker Robert Rodriguez has turned those 90 seconds of quick cuts and best-of moments into a full-length movie. And by "you," I mean everyone who goes to Comic-Con every year; the same niche crowd of 20,000 who heralded the cinematic success of "Snakes on a Plane" and "Scott Pilgrim. " People who make our movies (and that includes the movie stars, like Robert De Niro, who sign on for cameos)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
If the dismal receipts for "Smokin' Aces" and "Grindhouse" are an indicator, public appetite for lurid hyper-violence may be waning. Tough luck, perhaps, for "Shoot 'Em Up," which offers more of the same, but is elevated slightly by Clive Owen's darkly funny performance as a film-noir knight-errant who strives to protect an infant from successive waves of armed gunmen. Owen established himself in "Croupier" as that rare actor (sometimes Michael Caine, always George Sanders) who can make cynicism and a general contempt for everything around him seem somehow appealing.
NEWS
June 26, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Bruce Willis shoots into the hotel suite like a blue-eyed bullet, head shaved, T white, jeans pale as his orbs. The wiry actor is trim, more like a spokesmodel for the imaginary health supplement Diet Hard than an aging action hero flogging a movie franchise last seen during Clinton's first term. After an absence of 12 years, Willis' alter ego John McClane returns to theaters Wednesday in Live Free or Die Hard - or Die Hard 4.0, as it's called in Europe. Willis, 52, reprises the role of the battle-scarred NYPD detective who shoots from the hip and the lip, this time taking aim at cyberterrorists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
When Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez set out to make "Grindhouse," the double feature that honors the exploitation movies of the 1960s and 1970s, they had no idea which of their films would go first when the final three-hour project hit theaters. "Early on we said let's just go alphabetical and have the theater owners decide," Rodriguez said, with the understanding that his film, "Planet Terror," would lead the bill in Texas and Tarantino's "Death Proof" would topline in his home base of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Grindhouse is the generic name for exploitation flicks and the disreputable theaters that showed them. Some called them degraded films in degraded environments. Others called them a blast. These omnipotent fantasies for the powerless provided a junk-food high in the junkiest imaginable of settings. America's most gifted filmmakers got their starts with such zombie mashups, death races and soft-core porn. David Cronenberg's They Came From Within. Steven Spielberg's Duel. Jonathan Demme's Caged Heat.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|