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Grip

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NEWS
April 3, 2008
AS A 42-YEAR-OLD male whose belly is fattening while his hair is thinning, I wanted to tell you that your article purporting to show a link between middle-age weight gain and dementia is a load of bunk. And if you don't believe me, just ask my cat Abraham Lincoln, who read the article to me while we played No Limit Hold-'em with the Martians from next door. Mike Ginsberg, Philadelphia
TRAVEL
July 31, 2011
Wouldn't it be nice if golf clubs knew how to hit the ball just right for a long, powerful drive down the fairway? Dream on, but for now, you might get a hand with a new golf glove with a built-in LED digital monitor that warns you if your grip on the club is too tight for a good shot. The monitor, attached to the adjustable glove closure on the back, works with little sensors imbedded in the glove's fingers, providing continuous audio and visual feedback on grip pressure, even indicating which fingers are gripping too tightly - or if your grip is just right, based on your preset ideal pressure.
TRAVEL
September 25, 2011
Such a simple concept, so not-yet-available when I needed it so many times in the past. Hurray for Handle "It. " Two adjustable 8-foot straps and a heavy-duty plastic handle work together so you can carry big boxes or bundles at the airport, to the train or car, or from a gift shop, without juggling the load in your arms. The straps, which can be used either parallel or perpendicular to each other around a bundle, extend to hold packages of varying shapes and sizes. Keep a set in the car or suitcase just to be ready.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
On the title track of Aerosmith's new Get a Grip (Geffen), sage vocalist Steven Tyler offers this deep thought: Same old same old every day, if things don't change you're just gonna rot Cause if you do what you've always done, you'll always get what you always got. This is interesting because, on most of Get a Grip, Aerosmith does exactly what it's always done: make rollicking rock and roll with a vicious blues edge. Yet the desire for creative growth the band displayed on Pump's "Janie's Got a Gun" is there.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Four teen-age arms with spray-paint cans vent their emotions by defacing a neighborhood wall with graffiti. Then the wall comes alive and expresses its emotions - the angry, romantic, frivolous feelings of youth - in an absorbing dialogue with the teens. That's what happens in "Get a Grip," Freedom Theater's youth production. It opens tomorrow and runs for three weekends in the 125-seat North Philadelphia theater. In addition to the four teens appearing as members of the Desperateers spray-paint gang, nine young actors play the different emotions of the wall.
SPORTS
October 31, 2006 | By David Aldridge INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The defending two-time most valuable player in the NBA shows you his blistered hands. "It tears my fingers apart," Steve Nash said last week. "Like, every day. I just lotioned twice since practice. I just grip it, and the friction that comes from it, it tears my fingers apart. " Nash's fingers are getting cracked by the league's new basketball, rolled out with great fanfare in June during the Finals and set to make its official debut tonight when the NBA regular season begins.
LIVING
June 13, 1993 | By Mike Capuzzo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a rhyme, 152 years ago to be exact, a rambunctious raven named Grip - beloved pet of Charles Dickens, the bird that inspired Edgar Allan Poe to write The Raven - cried, "Halloa, old girl!" (his favorite expression), keeled over and expired. Yes, this was a terribly sad day in the Dickens household. "You will be greatly shocked and grieved to hear that the Raven is no more," Dickens wrote a friend on March 12, 1841, closing, "In profound sorrow, I am ever your bereaved friend . . . " After that, like a Dickens foundling with a secret benefactor, Grip went on to become perhaps the most famous dead bird in literary history - featured in Dickens' novel Barnaby Rudge, star of Poe's The Raven, remembered by generations of schoolchildren who can quote, "Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Molly Eichel, Daily News Staff Writer
QUOTH THE RAVEN, "Nevermore. " So says Edgar Allan Poe anyway. But what does "Nevermore" sound like with a Philly accent? Because the raven — yes, that raven — that inspired Poe's most famous work and the title of the new John Cusack-starring thriller — resides right here in town. At the Rare Book Department in the Central branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia, to be exact. Despite being an English bird by birth, the raven has resided at the library since 1971, when Col. Richard Gimbel, of the famed department-store dynasty, bequeathed the raven to the library.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
Tugboats ease the 45,000-ton battleship Wisconsin from its berth at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on its way to be refitted. The mothballed World War II ship, which is being reactivated, was torn from the grip of the Delaware River mud last week after a 28-year rest.
NEWS
January 12, 1998 | For The Inquirer / MARK STEIN
Safety starts young. That was the idea behind yesterday's self-defense workshop for 40 Camden County Junior Girl Scouts at Agatsu Dojos headquarters in Stratford. The session instructed the fourth to sixth graders in aikido, in which the goal is to redirect the force of the attack to the attacker's disadvantage. In the top photograph, 8-year-old Jessica Ritchie escapes the grip of instructor Gary Smith. In the bottom photo, the girls limber up before hitting the mat.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2015 | By Brion Shreffler, For The Inquirer
Much like its music, Death Grips' show at sold-out Union Transfer on Friday night felt like many things. Was this a punk or scream-o show in a West Philly basement? The high point of a metal fest? We were as jammed together as the genres that the band ably melds, with front man MC Ride, a.k.a. Stefan Burnett, overtaking seemingly every last soul from go, his presence up there with the fugue-state transcendence Matt Berninger delivers at shows for the National. Alternating between a lithe, swaying lilt and an explosive two-handed elbows-up hold on the microphone, MC Ride was the embodiment of the lines from "Takyon" (off the Exmilitary mix tape)
SPORTS
May 28, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Aaron Harang's long and winding career made a pit stop in Flushing in September 2013. The 6-foot-7 righthander spent that season's final few weeks starting for the New York Mets. The next month he was granted free agency. Considering the 362 starts and 1,780 strikeouts on his resumé, 23 innings of a third-place season in New York should serve as little more than a footnote to Harang's established major-league career. But even now, with the 37-year-old off to an incredible start to the season for the Phillies, he can thank the Mets - one coach in particular - for assisting his career renaissance.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than most, Ted Ruger understands legal complexity. And a good thing, too. The former Supreme Court law clerk is set to take over as dean of the University of Pennsylvania law school July 1. Penn, along with a handful of other elite U.S. law schools, brands itself as a training ground for top students who learn to grapple with the most difficult legal problems. That's why so many of the highest-paying law firms want to hire them, even in a job market that still is struggling.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun will set at 7 p.m. Sunday, and astronomers are calling for a 100 percent chance of an equinox in a little over two weeks. So why is the atmosphere stuck in January? After the second ice-shellacking in two days Tuesday, the National Weather Service was warning of the possibility of several inches of snow from Wednesday night into Thursday. "I'm very confident Thursday is going to be a difficult day," said Walter Drag, a lead forecaster at the National Weather Service office in Mount Holly.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty, For The Inquirer
STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. - For the last few years, ski resorts in cowboy country - and the skiers who love them - have been riding a bucking bronc. Huge dumps of snow blanketed slopes in the up years; in down years, late snow and warmer days cast a pall over the industry. At Steamboat Resort, in western Colorado, hard-core skiers were over the moon in 2008 when monster storms dropped 433 inches of snow on the slopes. But disbelief followed when the next winter brought fewer, weaker storms and half as much snow.
SPORTS
November 3, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
TWO DAYS after the first costly blunder of his young NFL career, Josh Huff approached Cedric Thornton with a request. "Try to get the ball from me," the rookie receiver said. This was just before the Eagles took the NovaCare Complex practice fields Tuesday for their first practice of the week. Thornton, a starting defensive end, relayed Huff's message to the rest of the defensive linemen, and for the rest of this past week they hounded No. 11 in green whenever he touched the ball.
SPORTS
September 16, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
ALL WE HAVE to go off is photo and video evidence and the claims of those involved, but Jonathan Papelbon staunchly maintained that what second-base umpire Joe West professed he saw - and what many others felt they saw - during yesterday's ninth inning was misinterpreted. After blowing a three-run lead against the Marlins, Papelbon walked toward the dugout as boos rained down from the Citizens Bank Park crowd. As he neared the steps to the dugout, the Phillies closer slowed his stride and reached for his crotch while looking straight ahead in the direction of fans along the first-base line.
SPORTS
August 18, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. - It's a new world, one that increasingly marginalizes defensive players. But if certain Eagles don't adjust to restrictions on contact downfield and use of the hands on the line, they will become refugees of the offense-friendly NFL. And there's nothing Chip Kelly or any NFL coach can do to save them. "You don't have to agree with the speed limit, but if the cop's out there with a speed gun, you better take your foot off the gas or he's going to pull you over," Kelly said after the Eagles fell to the New England Patriots, 42-35, in the preseason.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHAT YOU SAW was what you got with Emma Irene Horton. No pretense, no airs, just the honest, straightforward personality that charmed the people who knew her. Others, those who might have taken offense to her directness, just didn't know what they were missing. "Those who understood her loved her," said her daughter, Vivian H. Butler. "You took her as she was. " Irene Horton, stalwart churchgoer, devoted family matriarch and an outstanding cook in the Southern style, died April 27. She was 95 and living in Ambler but had lived most of her life in West Philadelphia.
SPORTS
February 21, 2014 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
INDIANAPOLIS - Asked where he sees the strongest array of talent in an NFL draft pool that's drawing raves for its overall depth, Howie Roseman talked about wide receiver. That assessment could have implications for the Eagles' 22nd overall first-round draft pick, and for pending free agents Jeremy Maclin and Riley Cooper. "I think it goes without saying that the wide-receiver class is unique," the Eagles' general manager said yesterday as the NFL Scouting Combine kicked off at Lucas Oil Stadium.
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