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Grip

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NEWS
April 3, 2008
AS A 42-YEAR-OLD male whose belly is fattening while his hair is thinning, I wanted to tell you that your article purporting to show a link between middle-age weight gain and dementia is a load of bunk. And if you don't believe me, just ask my cat Abraham Lincoln, who read the article to me while we played No Limit Hold-'em with the Martians from next door. Mike Ginsberg, Philadelphia
TRAVEL
July 31, 2011
Wouldn't it be nice if golf clubs knew how to hit the ball just right for a long, powerful drive down the fairway? Dream on, but for now, you might get a hand with a new golf glove with a built-in LED digital monitor that warns you if your grip on the club is too tight for a good shot. The monitor, attached to the adjustable glove closure on the back, works with little sensors imbedded in the glove's fingers, providing continuous audio and visual feedback on grip pressure, even indicating which fingers are gripping too tightly - or if your grip is just right, based on your preset ideal pressure.
TRAVEL
September 25, 2011
Such a simple concept, so not-yet-available when I needed it so many times in the past. Hurray for Handle "It. " Two adjustable 8-foot straps and a heavy-duty plastic handle work together so you can carry big boxes or bundles at the airport, to the train or car, or from a gift shop, without juggling the load in your arms. The straps, which can be used either parallel or perpendicular to each other around a bundle, extend to hold packages of varying shapes and sizes. Keep a set in the car or suitcase just to be ready.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Lessen tenure's grip Tenure for teachers was created when a career in education was highly esteemed but poorly compensated ("Playing politics with teachers' seniority," May 24). Once considered an asset, it has become a millstone. Tenure has made it almost impossible to ferret out those no longer relevant to their profession. No business could succeed with an underperforming workforce. Seniority does not top efficiency. Deficient tenured teachers work to the detriment of their students.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
On the title track of Aerosmith's new Get a Grip (Geffen), sage vocalist Steven Tyler offers this deep thought: Same old same old every day, if things don't change you're just gonna rot Cause if you do what you've always done, you'll always get what you always got. This is interesting because, on most of Get a Grip, Aerosmith does exactly what it's always done: make rollicking rock and roll with a vicious blues edge. Yet the desire for creative growth the band displayed on Pump's "Janie's Got a Gun" is there.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1989 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Four teen-age arms with spray-paint cans vent their emotions by defacing a neighborhood wall with graffiti. Then the wall comes alive and expresses its emotions - the angry, romantic, frivolous feelings of youth - in an absorbing dialogue with the teens. That's what happens in "Get a Grip," Freedom Theater's youth production. It opens tomorrow and runs for three weekends in the 125-seat North Philadelphia theater. In addition to the four teens appearing as members of the Desperateers spray-paint gang, nine young actors play the different emotions of the wall.
SPORTS
October 31, 2006 | By David Aldridge INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The defending two-time most valuable player in the NBA shows you his blistered hands. "It tears my fingers apart," Steve Nash said last week. "Like, every day. I just lotioned twice since practice. I just grip it, and the friction that comes from it, it tears my fingers apart. " Nash's fingers are getting cracked by the league's new basketball, rolled out with great fanfare in June during the Finals and set to make its official debut tonight when the NBA regular season begins.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Molly Eichel, Daily News Staff Writer
QUOTH THE RAVEN, "Nevermore. " So says Edgar Allan Poe anyway. But what does "Nevermore" sound like with a Philly accent? Because the raven — yes, that raven — that inspired Poe's most famous work and the title of the new John Cusack-starring thriller — resides right here in town. At the Rare Book Department in the Central branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia, to be exact. Despite being an English bird by birth, the raven has resided at the library since 1971, when Col. Richard Gimbel, of the famed department-store dynasty, bequeathed the raven to the library.
LIVING
June 13, 1993 | By Mike Capuzzo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once upon a rhyme, 152 years ago to be exact, a rambunctious raven named Grip - beloved pet of Charles Dickens, the bird that inspired Edgar Allan Poe to write The Raven - cried, "Halloa, old girl!" (his favorite expression), keeled over and expired. Yes, this was a terribly sad day in the Dickens household. "You will be greatly shocked and grieved to hear that the Raven is no more," Dickens wrote a friend on March 12, 1841, closing, "In profound sorrow, I am ever your bereaved friend . . . " After that, like a Dickens foundling with a secret benefactor, Grip went on to become perhaps the most famous dead bird in literary history - featured in Dickens' novel Barnaby Rudge, star of Poe's The Raven, remembered by generations of schoolchildren who can quote, "Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore.
NEWS
February 9, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL MALLY
Tugboats ease the 45,000-ton battleship Wisconsin from its berth at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard on its way to be refitted. The mothballed World War II ship, which is being reactivated, was torn from the grip of the Delaware River mud last week after a 28-year rest.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The word went out loudly when the votes were cast: Philadelphia's tax on sweetened drinks made history as the first of its kind enacted by a major U.S. city. But the vote also was extraordinary in a quieter way - a rare example of City Council navigating a contentious issue without Council President Darrell L. Clarke squarely behind the wheel. Instead, new Council members formed their own allegiances. Old members strengthened their bonds with outsiders and with Mayor Kenney. And Clarke, it seemed to many in City Hall, wound up in the backseat, voting for a tax he has always professed to hate after seeing it could pass without his support.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Lessen tenure's grip Tenure for teachers was created when a career in education was highly esteemed but poorly compensated ("Playing politics with teachers' seniority," May 24). Once considered an asset, it has become a millstone. Tenure has made it almost impossible to ferret out those no longer relevant to their profession. No business could succeed with an underperforming workforce. Seniority does not top efficiency. Deficient tenured teachers work to the detriment of their students.
NEWS
May 24, 2016 | BY JASON NARK, STAFF WRITER
On a cold March morning in Columbus, N.C., Sean Harrington sat shackled in an antebellum courthouse and saw through the window a mountain stretched out like a vast wall. The wind rattled bare trees there on White Oak Mountain and whipped up the falls on Horse Creek as it flowed south toward town. The sky above the Polk County Courthouse had been swept clean of clouds and Harrington's family filed past an American flag that thrashed atop a pole. The tallest thing Harrington, 26, had ever seen on Hancock Street, 600 miles away in South Philadelphia, was a telephone pole, and depending how his day in court went, he knew he might be an old man before he saw that skinny block by I-95 again.
SPORTS
April 26, 2016 | By Les Bowen, Staff Writer
I'VE BEEN PORING over the Eagles stories from early March, trying to find the place where Howie Roseman and Doug Pederson promised Sam Bradford he would be their quarterback forever, after signing him to a two-year, $35 million contract that everyone pointed out could really be a one-year contract, if 2016 didn't go well. Still haven't found those quotes. In fact, I'm pretty sure all of us who cover the team noted prominently that the structure and term of the deal in no way precluded the Eagles from drafting a franchise QB this coming Thursday.
SPORTS
February 23, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Between winter throwing sessions at his alma mater, Aaron Nola held a baseball in his right hand. He tinkered with different grips for his changeup as he paced the training facilities at Louisiana State University. The Phillies told Nola, their presumptive 22-year-old No. 1 pitcher, that if he were to do anything this winter, it was improve his change. "I played with several grips," Nola said. "One kind of fit me the best. One that I felt comfortable throwing. " This spring offers something of a luxury for Nola, a veteran of all of 13 major league starts.
SPORTS
November 22, 2015 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three weeks ago, Leonard Fournette had the Heisman Trophy in his grasp. The Louisiana State sophomore was a lock to win college football's most prestigious award, as much a certainty as Donald Trump saying something outrageous at his next campaign stop. But then, the season continued. After a first half that saw him rush for more than 200 yards in three consecutive games, Fournette has been unable to find the holes. He gained just 31 yards on 19 carries in the marquee Nov. 7 matchup against Alabama - a 30-14 loss - and managed 91 yards in last week's loss to Arkansas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
What is reality? For Ma and Jack, the mother and just-turned-5 son played with breathtaking might and magic by Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay, reality is a 10-by-10-foot shed, locked from the outside, a small roof window letting in a square of sky. In Room - written by Emma Donoghue, adapting her bestseller of the same name, and directed by Lenny Abrahamson - this is the place where parent and child live. She has been imprisoned for seven years. He has lived there since birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
It was a funny thing to watch Margaret Atwood's classic (since 1985) novel The Handmaid's Tale , as adapted by Joseph Stollenwerk, on Curio Theatre's stage last week. After all, Texas just announced it would end Medicaid contracts to Planned Parenthood, then followed up by raiding the state's clinics. It was the same week a congressional panel of mostly white men grilled Hillary Clinton in a manner reminiscent of its previous interruptathon aimed at Planned Parenthood CEO Cecile Richards.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Gypsy turns 60 in a few years, but the Media Theatre's current electrifying production proves that the old girl hasn't aged a bit. Arthur Laurents based his 1959 book for the musical on the memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee, a world-famous mid-20th-century burlesque dancer, who grew up as Louise (Anna Giordano), the neglected older sister of June (Taylor Elise Rector), a child actor on the vaudeville circuit. Their domineering mother, Rose (Kristine Fraelich), sacrificed both girls' childhoods in pursuit of stardom, driving them and her agent/fiance Herbie (Kelly Briggs)
NEWS
September 15, 2015
Heeding the pope's plea on aiding the poor Kudos to The Inquirer for reminding everyone that Pope Francis' visit must not become a public spectacle ("Pope wants to help the poor," Aug. 31). Indeed, this pope has made it his personal mission to alleviate the suffering of the poor, the hungry, the homeless and the marginalized. Given that Philadelphia has the highest poverty rate of any major city in the nation, this is an opportunity to highlight that unfortunate reality. For the last 30 years, my students at Germantown Academy have made it a priority to reach out to make a difference in the lives of those who are hungry and homeless in our city.
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