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NEWS
June 29, 1990 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Wiretaps on a North Philadelphia grocer's phone led yesterday to the convictions of two brothers from New York on heroin-trafficking charges. Following an eight-day trial and about four hours of deliberations, a federal jury in Philadelphia convicted Antonio Collado, 34, of Queens, and his brother, Policai Collado, 30, of Brooklyn, of conspiracy and other related charges. Three other defendants were found guilty of all charges. Assistant U.S. Attorney Frank R. Costello Jr., the case prosecutor, said evidence from the wiretaps showed that two defendants, Miriam Sanchez, 26, of 2nd Street near Cumberland, Philadelphia, and Victoria Frias, 27, of the Bronx, worked as couriers for the heroin ring, carrying money to New York and heroin back to Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mother of a grocer was shot and critically wounded yesterday, apparently by a man who had purchased a hoagie a few minutes earlier at the store in the Parkside section. The woman, whom Camden police identified as Kunson Silverstein, 62, of Browns Mills, was shot once in the chest with a handgun. She was listed in critical condition last night in the intensive care unit at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center, according to a hospital spokeswoman. Investigators said David Silverstein, who operates the Corner Store, a small grocery in the 1500 block of Kenwood Avenue, had left his mother to tend the store briefly while he went to the post office.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | By Karen Rouse, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joann Sheets was in the deli, halfway into her cheesesteak sandwich, when the bell on the door of the adjacent grocery store jingled, indicating that a customer had entered. She noticed the manager was absent and the grocery store cashier was busy serving customers in the deli. Sheets, a regular, put down her cheesesteak, headed up the two steps connecting the deli to the grocery, positioned herself behind the cash register, rang up the customer's items, bade her farewell and returned to finish her sandwich.
NEWS
March 22, 1996 | By Analisa Nazareno, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Returning to rob the same small grocery store he robbed a month earlier might not have been a smart thing to do. But that didn't stop Matthew E. Rosiana, according to Sgt. Brian Prior of Delanco police. Police said that Rosiana, 20, of the 300 block of Middleton Street in Riverside, and Steven A. Skillings, 20, of the 200 block of Whittaker Street in Riverside, threatened two cashiers in the Liberty Mart, at 700 Burlington Avenue at about 2:45 p.m. on Wednesday. Skillings pulled out a knife when the cashiers did not cooperate, and a struggle ensued, Prior said.
NEWS
October 1, 1992 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
He certainly wasn't rude. In fact, he was downright pleasant, even if he did have a gun. "How are you doing?" the man in the black silk jacket asked the customer at the Pathmark courtesy counter in Bensalem last Thursday afternoon. What the customer didn't realize was that the man was in the process of robbing the clerk behind the counter. "The witness standing next to him didn't know what was going on (until) she saw him take the money and run," said Township Police Capt.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | By Mara Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township police have found no evidence of food tampering in the Shop 'N' Bag in the Dutton Mill Shopping Center on Pennell Road. About 9:45 p.m. Saturday, police said, they received a call from the grocery reporting that several leaflets were found on the shelves. The leaflets said food had been tampered with by "angry animal rights activists," who wished to close the Aston Pet Center, also in the shopping center. The Aston Pet Center has been the target of protests since last December, resulting from allegations that the store kept animals in unfit conditions.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | BY JOSEPH INABINET
You're in the grocery store doing your shopping. Because the store doesn't put prices on the items, you feel like you're shopping blind. To find out how much something costs, you have to search for the shelf tag. If you can't find it or it didn't have one, there's no way to know how much it will cost - or to compare it to other items to see which is the best buy. All you can do is guess and hope it won't cost too much. Later you start to worry whether you have enough money.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Joyce Steele dreams of financial success and independence for her son Torre, which she hopes he'll find among carefully arranged displays of canned goods, breakfast cereals, baked beans, toilet paper, ketchup and other grocery items for sale at Lenape High School. Until this year Room D107 at the high school in Medford was a classroom that looked like dozens of others at the school. The chalkboard is still there, but now D107 has a new name and a new look that includes a cash register, aisle shelves, a conveyor belt and a refrigerator.
NEWS
September 5, 1998 | by Maureen Tkacik, Daily News Staff Writer
So what were officials at Super Fresh thinking when they tried to close the 30-year-old store in North Philadelphia's Progress Plaza with only four days' notice two weeks ago? "I don't know how that decision was made," company spokesman Andy Currano said yesterday. Fortunately for the supermarket's 58 employees - only half of whom were guaranteed transfers to other Super Fresh stores following the supermarket's' close - a city ordinance prevents businesses employing more than 20 people from shutting down without giving 60 days' notice to employees.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Butts Jr., 64, whose neighborhood grocery store at 23d and Cambria Streets in Swampoodle was the end of the rainbow for the throngs of candy-loving kids from Peirce Elementary School just across the street, died Friday, a week after being shot in the stomach by a robber. Mr. Butts died at Allegheny University Hospitals/MCP. The grocer, who lived in an apartment above the store, died just two months before he was going to retire and finally take that vacation he had been waiting for during the 27 years he dispensed candy, bread, milk and advice at George's Variety Store, so often crammed with youngsters.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
August 26, 2016 | By Casey A. Gilman, Staff Writer
"We're living in this time when if you ask people if they're happy with what they're eating, almost everyone says no," said Christina Bognet, founder of PlateJoy, a personalized, online nutrition service. PlateJoy is just one of the many companies cashing in on Americans' hunger for fresh, fast, at-home food, and the movement toward "a healthy lifestyle" and away from "diets. " Some companies, like PlateJoy, provide meal-planning with healthful recipes and shopping lists ( Relish!
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Colt Shaw, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Changes in how Pennsylvania sells wine will go into effect next month. However, consumers might not see wine in the likes of Wegmans and Acmes until Thanksgiving - if then. The sheer logistics of getting a new system up is going to be a challenge, according to those involved in both the licensing and retail sides. That process has been complicated by how quickly the measure moved through the legislature. Changes to how alcohol is sold have long been controversial in Pennsylvania, where liquor laws date to the end of the Prohibition and the state Liquor Control Board has held an iron monopoly over the sale of wine and spirits.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - For the first time since before Prohibition, Pennsylvanians will be able to buy wine at grocery stores. Barely a day after it sped through the House and unexpectedly landed on his desk, Gov. Wolf on Wednesday signed a law to let hundreds of restaurants, hotels, and grocery stores sell wine. The bill takes effect in 60 days, though it might take months for consumers to see the impact. Besides granting by-the-bottle wine licenses for stores that already sell beer, the measure takes steps to loosen the state's oft-criticized control of the alcohol market.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
German supermarket giant Lidl is building up a real estate team in Philadelphia, establishing the city and environs as a beachhead in its aggressive U.S. expansion, the company's first foray outside Europe. The discount chain, a unit of the Schwarz Group grocery conglomerate, is seeking an acquisition manager and three other real estate staffers in the city, according to its U.S. website. Another acquisition manager is being sought in Pittsburgh, while more than a hundred additional slots are open - for jobs ranging from store managers to human-resources personnel - in a strip of East Coast states between Virginia, where Lidl U.S. is headquartered in Arlington, and Georgia.
NEWS
April 19, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Not a grocery levy Soda is not, nor should it be, a staple of the family grocery budget. As I have been telling my pediatric patients and their parents for years, a soda is a candy bar in a can. It is a treat to be enjoyed on special occasions. The beverage industry lobbyists are wrong when they say the proposed 3-cents-an-ounce tax on sugary drinks will drastically impact families and shoppers, claiming there would be a large spike in grocery prices. It's just not true.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Clark DeLeon
I walked into a bar-restaurant on Broad Street on New Year's Day looking for an old friend and instead I found our new mayor sitting by himself, surrounded by people who didn't recognize him and had never heard his name. Jim Kenney looked perfectly at ease in his anonymity at a place called Bliss. He sat at the elbow on the far end of the bar that faced the floor-to-ceiling windows along Broad Street and framed the passing string bands and fancy brigades like a huge-TV/video-screen tuned to the Mummers Channel.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2015
Before, you could count on burning a few calories walking from your car to the grocery store, or roaming the aisles to load up on what you needed. But that notion has gone out the car window, as major supermarket chains and big-box retailers, such as Walmart, are investing heavily in online grocery and curbside pickup. And with good reason. Online-retail analysts estimate that U.S. consumers spent about $24 billion buying groceries online last year, or about 4 percent of their total grocery spending of $591.6 billion on grocery shopping, according to the U.S. Commerce Department.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plans to build a new ShopRite supermarket on the Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden, a project that had been announced for completion next year, seem to have stalled. The 75,000-square-foot store, which would be the city's second full-service supermarket, was announced in 2013 by local officials, who said it would be the anchor tenant of a shopping center near South 17th Street. At that time, developer Ken Goldenberg of the Goldenberg Group said he expected the site to be completed in 2015.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust, owner of Exton Square Mall in Chester County, plans to demolish the site's Kmart building and replace it with a large-format organic grocery store. PREIT chief executive Joseph Coradino told analysts in a conference call Wednesday that the grocer would be named in the coming days. A lease for 55,000 square feet has been executed, he said. Philadelphia-based PREIT also has identified a dine-in movie theater and a bowling-and-entertainment center as prospective tenants for the former site of a 118,000-square-foot J.C. Penney Co. store at Exton Square, Coradino said.
FOOD
July 10, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When NetCost Market opened its second Philadelphia location this summer, management instituted a new rule: Staff must speak English. The goal, said Andre Malkin, a partner and vice president of operations, was to reframe the store as a supermarket for everyone - not just the Russian and Eastern European immigrants that are the company's core demographic. "We have to have more English presence to make people comfortable and not to feel intimidated," said Malkin, who had heard from customers that staff in the past would address them only in Russian.
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