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Grocery

NEWS
September 1, 1988 | By Pete Schnatz, Special to The Inquirer
For Marlynn Rutenberg of the Far Northeast, grocery shopping is usually a solo chore, a pleasant excursion that takes her away from the daily routine of picking up after a family of seven. So why was Rutenberg, along with baby sitter Jeanne Jagodzinski, toting four children - ages 2 through 8 - to the Carrefour hypermarket complex on Tuesday? The answer is Olympiad '88, a series of sports exhibitions featuring everything from area youth displaying their double-dutch jump-rope skills to the dazzling performances of professional high divers, hot-dog skiers, acrobats and gymnasts, all brought together in the parking lot of Carrefour at Knights and Woodhaven Roads.
FOOD
September 16, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
One block east of the Bomb Bomb Bar-be-que Grill in deep South Philly (four blocks before Oregon), you encounter what is ostensibly a Mexican corner grocery, necklaced in car-lot pennants, the exterior, in this case, a brash habanero-orange. It is not immediately apparent here at Los Gallos, 10th and Wolf, but behind the stacked tortillas and bottles of pickled corn smut (the prized Mexican fungus called huitlacoche) , there resides a tiny taqueria, itching to make its move.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1987 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Frankford-Quaker Grocery Co., a supermarket wholesaler that has been a fixture in Northeast Philadelphia since 1888, may leave the city for the suburbs, company officials said yesterday. If the move takes place, it would cost the city 444 jobs. Most likely, the new location would be in Oaks, near King of Prussia, where Frankford-Quaker's parent company has its regional office and warehouse. Richard D. Harrison, chairman of Fleming Cos., which acquired Frankford- Quaker last year, said that merging the two facilities would cut costs considerably.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Steve Conrad's The Promotion isn't exactly the sort of high-concept comedy that's all about, oh, I don't know, an Israeli commando-turned-coiffeur. But that's actually one of this low-key, oddball indie's strengths: It's totally down-to-earth, as real as a trip to the supermarket. Which, in fact, is where a good deal of the Chicago-set comedy takes place: in the aisles, checkout lanes and parking lot of Donaldson's, a grocery that prides itself on customer satisfaction, and which is in the process of opening a new store.
NEWS
June 7, 2008 | By Jeff Gammage INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the $500 million stadium complex for the region's new pro soccer team gets built, it's supposed to include an amenity that vanished from Chester nearly a decade ago: A supermarket. So, people must be pretty excited, right? "I'll believe it when I see it," snapped Joan Broadfield, a longtime city resident. In downtrodden Chester, the absence of so elemental an enterprise as a supermarket rankles. People want a well-stocked store not only because of the convenience but also because supermarkets can help transform the health and welfare of entire communities - offering nutritious vegetables, fruits and meats; increasing the tax base; and, not least, providing jobs for young people.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | By Lauren Mayk, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A new online company plans to bring to the region 400 jobs and the convenience of getting bananas - overripe if you prefer - and extra-green peppers without a trip to the grocery store. Shoplink.com, a Massachusetts-based company that provides groceries, household products, and dry cleaning and other services to customers who order them online, announced this week that it will open its third and largest distribution facility in Westampton by late fall. The 127,000-square-foot facility is expected to serve about 20,000 customers in 85 Pennsylvania and New Jersey municipalities.
NEWS
October 7, 2000 | By John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man using a grocery clerk as a human shield was shot in the chest yesterday by a police officer outside a Camden store. Armed with a stolen handgun, Jimmy Vargas, 32, alternately trained the weapon on hostage Dionisio Marte and his own head, authorities said, as he faced off with police in front of the Jose Luis Food Market, 454 Royden Street. "If you don't shoot me, I'm going to shoot him [Marte]," the gunman shouted during the mid-morning standoff, authorities said. About five minutes into the confrontation, Marte was able to shift his body away from Vargas.
NEWS
June 24, 2000 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Saba Bireda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
An argument between a clerk and a customer inside a North Philadelphia grocery yesterday over nonpayment of a bill turned deadly when the clerk pulled a handgun and shot the patron, police said. Troy Leslie, 34, died after earlier taking some lunch meat, a soda, and a bag of potato chips from the Torres Mini-Market, 23d and Huntingdon Streets, irking the clerk, a man known only by the nickname "Papo," investigators said. Papo fled the store with the murder weapon, a handgun, and was being sought last night, police said.
NEWS
July 31, 2002 | By Gaiutra Bahadur INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The afternoon that robbers shot to death John Young Hong in his Norristown grocery, a "For Sale" sign already was tacked onto the brick storefront. He and his wife were planning their escape from the shop that had anchored their American dream for almost three decades. Hong, hobbled by arthritis, was eager to travel and spend more time with his grandchildren. But he never got to see his granddaughter Taylor, born a month after he was buried. Eight days shy of Hong's 60th birthday, just hours before the new year, police found him lying on his back behind his store counter, a leather holster, his silver revolver, and two black knit caps cast aside on the floor beside him. That image - as described by police - lodged stubbornly in the mind of Hong's wife, Sook.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | By Jeff McGaw, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Riddick Bowe. Dave Winfield. Michael Jordan. Wayne Gretzky. Great athletes. Champions who have soared to the heights of physical endeavor. But not one of them can pack groceries like Jennifer Williams. Williams, 21, of Sellersville, was crowned Pennsylvania's "Best Bagger" by the Pennsylvania Food Merchants Association in a competition held Sept. 20 at the Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort in Atlantic City. Williams, an employee of Genuardi Super Markets in the Kulpsville store, took 50 seconds to pack 38 grocery items into two evenly weighted grocery bags without crushing any bread or breaking any eggs.
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