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Grocery

NEWS
January 8, 1996 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After 20 years on State Street, the Thriftway market will close this month - leaving the borough without a full-service grocery store. Ed Chantigian, who knows many of his customers by name, said that business had been declining and that his father, Robert, 80, was ready to retire. The family plans to lease the building at 30 E. State St. to Thrift Drug, which could open a store as early as April, he said. The Chantigians have been selling and delivering groceries in Media since Robert Chantigian opened a mom-and-pop grocery store, Media Terminal Market, in 1951.
NEWS
March 29, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Main Line's newest grocery store boasts how its products won't have preservatives, artificial colors and refined sugars. The store also may lack parking spaces. The construction of Fresh Fields in Wynnewood Square, at 339 E. Lancaster Ave., has neighboring businesses and their customers abuzz with talk of the popular "healthy" food market's official opening April 28. And though all agree that the store will undoubtedly lure more business - already interest in empty space at the neighboring Wynnewood West shopping center has had a boost since Fresh Fields started construction - almost all the neighboring merchants express concern about the squeeze the grocer could place on parking at both shopping centers.
NEWS
March 30, 1987 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Thomas Ritter shook his head earlier this month and talked about being caught between his two worlds. For some time, he had struggled with a problem that pitted his business knowledge against the feelings in his heart. His business sense won out March 17 when Mr. Ritter, a minister at Second Macedonia Baptist Church in West Oak Lane as well as an active developer of civic projects in depressed communities, ordered the eviction of the employee-owned O&O supermarket from the $3.15 million Strawberry Square Mall at 29th and Dauphin Streets in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Grocery shopping was always dead last on Maria Solorzano's list of household chores, especially on those days when she had to take her three small children with her. That sparked an idea, but it remained just an idea for more than 20 years, while Solorzano reared her three daughters and worked as a manager for Kmart in Florida and then Burlington County. Having groceries delivered to a customer's home isn't anything new, but ordering groceries from a warehouse that would only sell groceries for home delivery was different, Solorzano thought.
NEWS
October 1, 2008 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a boutique grocery that specialized in quality meats and produce, and that anchored the Chestnut Hill shopping strip for nearly a century. Last month, Caruso's Market, 8418-24 Germantown Ave., closed abruptly, leaving many residents recalling bygone days of personal service and a family-friendly atmosphere, and wondering what will become of the property. Fran O'Donnell, head of the Chestnut Hill Business Association, lamented the loss. "I think the closing brought great concern to the community as far as being a fixture there, but also as a necessity," O'Donnell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2009 | By BETH D'ADDONO For the Daily News
ALTHOUGH she's never claimed to be clairvoyant, Sandra Lee had a hunch 17 months ago that the economy was going to go south. While she's the first to say the only economics she speaks is the home variety, Lee had a feeling that economic forces were going to put most Americans on a budget. She figured busy working people were going to need help feeding their families for less. Which is why Lee, cookbook author and star of the series "Semi-Homemade Cooking With Sandra Lee" on the Food Network, came up with an idea for a new show in late 2007.
NEWS
December 11, 1996 | By Deborah Kong, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It takes Jane Crowley seven minutes to walk to the Talk of the Town grocery store at Kings Highway and Chapel Avenue from her apartment at Towers of Windsor Park. In the 11 years she has shopped there, Crowley has made these small trips almost daily, buying as much as she can carry each time. Yesterday, she looped bags filled with frozen orange juice, bread, a dozen eggs and soup over her arms as she headed home. Soon, such trips will end for Crowley and her neighbors in the 550-unit Towers of Windsor Park apartments, and for those who live in the nearby Jewish Federation Apartments - most of them elderly and without cars.
NEWS
September 4, 2002 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pena family switched from running a store in Kensington to running one in Kingsessing earlier this year because of a business opportunity and what they saw as a move to a relatively safe neighborhood. Yesterday, Lina Pena, 53, was fatally shot at the new store, Brian Groceries, which she and her husband opened in March at 52d and Beaumont Streets, far from their old store across town at Jasper and Albert Streets. Police said a bullet hit her in the head during a struggle that involved two assailants.
NEWS
June 1, 2003 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shopping-cart gridlock hit the new Supremo Food Market in the Nicetown-Tioga neighborhood yesterday, 45 minutes into its grand opening. Throughout the produce section, some patrons stuffed plastic bags with plantains and collard greens while other customers stood six-deep at the deli counter. As the back aisle of the store became impassable with carts, mothers sent children darting through the crowds to retrieve packages of ground beef and bags of turkey necks. At the front of the store, as the harried cashiers frantically tried to reduce the lines snaking through the aisles, the Rev. James S. Hall of Triumph Baptist Church watched the chaos unfold and smiled.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fold it with cheese and you have a quesadilla; fry it flat, add refried beans, and you have a tostada; cut it into triangles, fry them, and you have tortilla chips. The baked corn-flour flatbreads called tortillas are the multifunctional dining fare at the heart of a booming international industry. In the Philadelphia region, though, only two Chester County grocers make and sell fresh tortillas. "If I don't have fresh tortillas, I just don't feel comfortable," said Humberto Rocha of El Sombrero grocery store and tortilla bakery - called a tortilleria - in Avondale.
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