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BUSINESS
October 6, 2000 | By Henry J. Holcomb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Captain Kirk is getting out of the grocery and gasoline business. William Shatner, who played Star Trek's Captain Kirk, has been promising in national television commercials that consumers can cut grocery bills in half using Priceline.com, but the Internet marketer said yesterday it was dropping food and gasoline from its name-your-own-price services. Priceline.com will continue to sell airline tickets, hotel rooms, rental cars, and other services online. WebHouse Club, the company's gas-and-groceries licensee, said it could not raise sufficient capital over the next year to expand enough to become profitable.
NEWS
July 11, 2000 | By Sufiya Abdur-Rahman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Customer support for a Saturdays-only sidewalk market at Head House Square has convinced Councilman Frank DiCicco to drop his opposition. Because of "overwhelming support from the community and patrons, I am now reversing my decision and asking that L&I [Department of Licenses and Inspections] issue the proper permits to allow the sidewalk market to reopen and continue," DiCicco said yesterday. DiCicco had ordered the closing last week because of opposition from owners of Chef's Market, a grocery store in the 200 block of South Street.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As soon as Janet Bergen pulled her car to the door of the Food Zone, employee Jen Waite came out to take her food order. "Somebody told me you were here, and I didn't believe it," Bergen said from her car. "This is wonderful. " With chilly temperatures and an ice storm still in evidence, Bergen, of Newtown Township, said she was happy to be able to pick up a few items without getting her two young children out of the car. She ordered a gallon of 2 percent milk, a half-gallon of whole milk and a quart of skim milk.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Peggy Powell spent two hours in a supermarket last week, not food shopping, but scrutinizing the labels. What she found was an eye-opener. "I was overwhelmed by the fact that so many manufacturers use so much fat in foods," said Powell of Newtown Square, whose diabetic husband is recuperating from extensive heart surgery. Powell was one of nearly two dozen people who took the EatRight Supermarket Tour at Genuardi's Tuesday morning. It was one of two tours organized that day by Main Line Health Inc., an umbrella group for Bryn Mawr, Lankenau, Paoli and Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospitals.
NEWS
April 29, 2003 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a robber shot him in his family's grocery store last month, Miguel Espinal, 60, helped his wife struggle with the gunman. He probably saved her life, relatives said. Espinal, a well-known member of North Camden's Dominican community, died Friday after 26 days in a hospital. "It's been a shock for us," said his 22-year-old son, Joel. "We didn't expect anyone from North Camden would kill my dad. " Espinal had managed his brother's grocery, La Dominicana, in the 900 block of North Seventh Street since immigrating here about 15 years ago. He raised his four children in an apartment above the store.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2002 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A months-long program to change the name of Philadelphia-area Fresh Fields stores to Whole Foods Market was scheduled to be completed yesterday, officials of the upscale natural-foods chain said. Banners stamped with Fresh Fields, which have covered new signs bearing the Whole Foods Market name, the name of its parent company, were coming down at stores on Callowhill Street and South Street in Philadelphia, and at stores in Jenkintown, Marlton, North Wales, Wayne and Wynnewood, said Sarah Kenney, marketing director for Whole Foods' Mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
May 17, 2009 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Patrick Gibbons, whose job hours were recently cut, the items he stocked up on during a food auction at a Bucks County fire hall yesterday meant the difference between surviving another month and not making it. That's how much the margin has narrowed, he said, for folks like him who are watching every dollar while in the grip of economic uncertainty. "It's been rough," said Gibbons, 37, a fabricator for the cryogenic industry in Plumsteadville, who is losing two days' work every other week as his employer trims costs.
LIVING
March 2, 2000 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The fridge is nearly empty, and the supermarket beckons. But, I figure, there might be an easier and cheaper way: Grocery shopping online. Will I really save up to 50 percent on my favorite brand of o.j. at Priceline's WebHouse Club? Is it really worth my while to haggle over Brawny or Bounty paper towels, three rolls to a pack? I start clicking. At the Web site (http://www.priceline.com), I click on groceries, and a list pops up with 38 categories covering more than 200 items.
FOOD
June 2, 1993 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a typical shopping trip at the Warminster Giant. You're walking down the pasta aisle, looking for inspiration, when it comes. From another shopper? The lyrics of the song playing over the PA system? A coupon somebody dropped? No. From your shopping cart. "Francesco Rinaldi Pasta Sauce, 30 oz. assorted varieties, on sale for 99 cents," the cart informs you. One problem solved. Now, how about a snack for the kids? In the snack aisle come displayed suggestions, a la cart, so to speak: "Orville Redenbacher's Popcorn, $1.79 for 10.5 oz.; Santitas Corn Chips, normally $1.39, 79 cents for 10 oz., Tortilla or Cantina.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Kitty Dumas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe Carcione, 73, "the Green Grocer" to thousands of television viewers, died yesterday at a hospital outside San Francisco after a bout with cancer. Mr. Carcione, whose syndicated television segment aired locally on WPVI-TV (Channel 6) during the noon and 5 p.m. news, died at 4:15 p.m., said a spokeswoman at Peninsula Hospital in Burlingame, Calif. David Prohaska, senior producer at the station, said Mr. Carcione had been hospitalized several times in his battle against cancer.
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