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Gross Clinic

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December 13, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
It rises 16 feet in the air, stretching toward the skylighted ceiling of the studio in Old Tarble Hall on the Swarthmore College campus. It is black and creepy. Skeletal fingers reach out toward anyone passing by. Beheaded bodies rise from the top and disembodied arms float near the center. A foot-long scalpel thrusts out, arming a confident Dr. Samuel Gross, the same Samuel Gross memorialized in Thomas Eakins' great 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic . But in this Swarthmore rendering, Dr. Gross has heft and weight.
NEWS
December 1, 2006 | By E. Daniel Larkin
Philadelphians have been eloquent in their anguished anger at Thomas Jefferson University's sale of Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic to the National Gallery and a proposed museum in Bentonville, Ark., backed by Wal-Mart heirs. I sympathize with efforts to raise $68 million to keep the painting here. But the city's and region's patrons are already pressed to support our wonderful artistic and cultural organizations. I suggest a use of funds that will better serve our cultural institutions and present the city to the world.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A vacationing Belgian radiologist stood rigid and transfixed in front of the newly restored Thomas Eakins 1875 master painting, The Gross Clinic , on Saturday, the first day of an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Perelman Building. It looked as though the doctor, Francis Cuigniez of Gant, saw himself as one of the Jefferson Medical College students in the painting, humbled by the man once called the "Emperor of American Surgery," the formidable Dr. Samuel Gross.
NEWS
November 23, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
A local medical institution and an art museum have offered collegial and financial support for efforts to keep Thomas Eakins' masterpiece The Gross Clinic in Philadelphia. The board of trustees of the James A. Michener Art Museum in Bucks County has agreed to contribute to the fund-raising campaign launched by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the head of the Michener Museum said. The College of Physicians of Philadelphia issued a statement of support for the campaign yesterday, noting the college "will help in any way. " In the statement, the college's board of trustees said the painting "represents an irreplaceable treasure of both medicine and art in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
French philosopher Simone Weil observed that "the past, once destroyed, never returns. Its destruction is perhaps the greatest of all crimes. " That snippet of insight might apply to moving the Barnes Foundation, but fortunately not to Thomas Eakins' masterpiece, The Gross Clinic. Since it was exhibited in the Centennial exposition of 1876 (not in the art section but in a mock-up of an Army hospital), the painting has undergone five major conservation interventions. Given that several of these effaced history, one hesitates to describe them all as "restorations.
NEWS
November 14, 2006 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The Gross Clinic is not only a majestic allegory that celebrates the triumph of scientific rationalism, it is generally recognized as the greatest work by the city's most famous and talented artist. Any list of the top 10 American paintings must include Thomas Eakins' painting, notable both for its multiple levels of meaning and for its compositional power and technical brilliance. Completed in 1876, the work is most obviously a magnetic portrait of a celebrated local surgeon, Samuel D. Gross - Eakins' best, most incisive character study.
NEWS
December 12, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
"It's amazing," said Jonathan Meade, standing in the lobby of Two Penn Center watching Thomas Eakins' painting The Gross Clinic materialize right before his eyes. There it was: Commanding figure of the thoughtful doctor, fingers closed about a scalpel; patient, thigh slit open, chloroform-drenched cloth over his face, lying next to the doctor; cringing mother, gnarled fingers contorted, turning away; students arrayed up the sides of the clinical amphitheater in the background. "It catches your eye," said Meade, who was visiting his hometown from Baltimore and was just plain intrigued by the canvas.
NEWS
April 24, 2008 | By Edward J. Sozanski FOR THE INQUIRER
The emotionally charged saga of Thomas Eakins' iconic painting The Gross Clinic ended on a positive note yesterday when the Philadelphia Museum of Art announced that it had raised the last chunk of money needed to keep the 19th-century masterpiece in Philadelphia. The museum disclosed that it had sold an Eakins painting from its collection, Cowboy Singing, to the Denver Art Museum and the private Anschutz Collection, also in Denver, which will own it jointly. The sale also included two oil sketches for another western scene by Eakins, Cowboys in the Badlands.
NEWS
January 21, 2007 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gail Ferretti, a local artist, had seen The Gross Clinic only in art books, newspapers and magazines. So she was excited as she stood in a line last night waiting to enter gallery 151 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. There, in its gold frame, hung the 19th-century painting by Thomas Eakins, which has become the cause of much angst and joy in Eakins' home city. "I have seen it in print, and the colors always look different," Ferretti said. "I want to see what the real colors look like.
NEWS
August 11, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Incoming freshmen to the University of Pennsylvania, as at many schools across the country, typically start their college careers reading a common book and then discussing it - an orientation activity meant to unify the class. This fall, the 19-year-old project takes a new twist at Penn: Students will study and discuss a painting, Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic. Penn officials said they think they are the first to use a painting for the orientation project, and national officials knew of no other school.
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NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Gross Clinic , Thomas Eakins' 1875 masterpiece, is back at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where it hangs when it is not at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The back-and-forth travels of this monumental painting, owned jointly by the two institutions since a dramatic public fund-raising campaign ended in its acquisition in 2006, have almost always been marked by something special: a complete cleaning and restoration of the picture, for instance; or its installation in an unusual setting, such as a 2011 exhibition focusing on the human body at PAFA, where Eakins taught and was famously fired for showing too much of the male anatomy to female art students.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone visiting the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts hoping to see both of its Edward Hopper paintings will be disappointed. The academy sold Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken (1934) in December for $40.5 million to raise funds for other art. Only his Apartment Houses (1923) remains. A trip to St. Charles Borromeo Seminary on City Avenue to view its six Thomas Eakins oils will also disappoint. In March, the seminary announced the portraits will be sold to fund renovations.
NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Edward Hopper's Depression-era painting East Wind Over Weehawken , a bleak New Jersey streetscape owned by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts for more than 60 years, was sold to an anonymous private buyer Thursday for $40.5 million at Christie's sale of American art. The price, which includes the auction house cut, represents a record for a Hopper painting and far exceeds Christie's pre-auction estimates of $22 million to...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
EVERY horror movie I've seen has led me to this fateful night, to this dim alcove filled with strangers and stained wood, and to one unavoidable, terrifying fact. In the movie "Sleepover at the Mutter Museum," I would play the journalist, the skeptic who thinks he's seen it all, cynical until the very moment I'm heading off to the bathroom, alone, and I'm decapitated by some undead skeleton swinging a scythe. My character wouldn't make it. My wife, Niki, is by my side and that's reassuring for the moment, but she's more open to the unknown than I am. In the movie, she might try to befriend some malevolent force and become possessed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
It rises 16 feet in the air, stretching toward the skylighted ceiling of the studio in Old Tarble Hall on the Swarthmore College campus. It is black and creepy. Skeletal fingers reach out toward anyone passing by. Beheaded bodies rise from the top and disembodied arms float near the center. A foot-long scalpel thrusts out, arming a confident Dr. Samuel Gross, the same Samuel Gross memorialized in Thomas Eakins' great 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic . But in this Swarthmore rendering, Dr. Gross has heft and weight.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
French philosopher Simone Weil observed that "the past, once destroyed, never returns. Its destruction is perhaps the greatest of all crimes. " That snippet of insight might apply to moving the Barnes Foundation, but fortunately not to Thomas Eakins' masterpiece, The Gross Clinic. Since it was exhibited in the Centennial exposition of 1876 (not in the art section but in a mock-up of an Army hospital), the painting has undergone five major conservation interventions. Given that several of these effaced history, one hesitates to describe them all as "restorations.
NEWS
July 25, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A vacationing Belgian radiologist stood rigid and transfixed in front of the newly restored Thomas Eakins 1875 master painting, The Gross Clinic , on Saturday, the first day of an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Perelman Building. It looked as though the doctor, Francis Cuigniez of Gant, saw himself as one of the Jefferson Medical College students in the painting, humbled by the man once called the "Emperor of American Surgery," the formidable Dr. Samuel Gross.
NEWS
July 20, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
As a young conservator, fresh from graduate school, Mark S. Tucker found himself facing a humbling task. In 1980, he joined the conservation department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and was thrown into preparations for the large retrospective of Thomas Eakins' work the museum would be mounting in 1982. That's when he first encountered Eakins' 1875 masterpiece, The Gross Clinic , owned at the time by Jefferson Medical College. "I did a very, very minor treatment on it," Tucker said the other day. "It had surface grime on it and I removed that.
NEWS
May 2, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Tucked away on the third floor of the art deco Perelman Building, in a corner nook hidden by a towering black screen, hangs what is widely considered the greatest American painting of the 19th century. Thomas Eakins' masterpiece, The Gross Clinic (1875), is resting comfortably in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's conservation laboratory. The 8-by-6-foot canvas has a semiprivate room these days, sharing space only with a small Rembrandt head of Christ. Seeing the painting here is almost like barging unannounced into a convalescent's room.
NEWS
August 11, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Incoming freshmen to the University of Pennsylvania, as at many schools across the country, typically start their college careers reading a common book and then discussing it - an orientation activity meant to unify the class. This fall, the 19-year-old project takes a new twist at Penn: Students will study and discuss a painting, Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic. Penn officials said they think they are the first to use a painting for the orientation project, and national officials knew of no other school.
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