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SPORTS
March 4, 2014 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Staff Writer
SAINT JOSEPH'S has played its way into the NCAA Tournament. If the selections had been yesterday, the Hawks would have been well into the field, perhaps as a 10 or 11 seed. After winning 83-74 at St. Bonaventure Saturday, its 17th win in 20 games, SJU (21-7, 11-3 Atlantic 10) also was very close to clinching a bye to the A-10 Tournament quarterfinals. Given that the at-large field is constantly evolving, SJU could get passed and be back out of the field, but the Hawks are in a great spot as the regular season enters its final week.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN Edwin Huntingdon Parker's Philadelphia apartment was robbed, he shrugged and said, "They probably needed it more than me. " That sounded like Parker. He was generous and forgiving almost to a fault. "He was honest even when it was to his detriment," said longtime friend Robert Kahn, AIDS activist and supervisor in the city's Anti-Bias Agency. "He was one of the most honest, positive and generous people I have ever known. " Edwin Huntingdon Parker, well-known in the theater world as a costume designer who worked with local theater and opera companies and toured the world with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, died Feb. 9 of metastatic lung cancer.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Port Richmond, residents are exposed to air pollution from oceangoing vessels, factories, and heavy traffic along I-95. In Overbrook, toxic chemicals in area waterways and water quality overall are issues. Many in Philadelphia's Hispanic neighborhoods don't realize the danger of lead contamination from older, deteriorating buildings. All three are the target of environmental-justice funding from the U.S. Department of Environmental Protection, whose deputy administrator, Bob Perciasepe, traveled to Philadelphia on Wednesday to highlight the grants.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients with eczema tend to start itching before they see a rash, rather than the other way around, leading some to call it "the itch that rashes. " So what is this invisible agent that causes the itch? Herbert B. Allen has been scratching his head over that one for years, but recently the Drexel University dermatologist achieved a measure of intellectual relief. He and a team of colleagues at Drexel's College of Medicine report that the culprit is a slime-like substance called biofilm, produced by Staphylococcus bacteria on the skin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Quatuor Ebene had its share of winter-travel snafus traveling from Paris to its Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert on Wednesday - encountering a connecting flight with no pilot to fly the plane. But no special sympathy was needed to embrace the kind of music-making exemplified by the group's Kimmel Center concert. This young French group has long exhibited an enterprising intelligence and personality that delivers a detailed, interior view of the music. In contrast to the Promethean Marlboro manner of the 1970s, Quatour Ebene has a reined-in sound envelope that doesn't translate into emotional reserve or suaveness but creates a cleaner landscape for the music's expressive events, more than groups who "play out" emphatically.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scan the book reviews and you'd think The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America was the latest manifesto from the Klu Klux Klan. A follow-up to her best-selling 2011 memoir Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother , Amy Chua's new book is a sociological study - complete with plenty of statistics, academic references and endnotes - that tries to pinpoint why certain cultural and ethnic groups have had more economic and social success in America than others.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group led by former Philadelphia Managing Director Joe Certaine has called on the city to suspend imminent renovations to Weccacoe Playground because of potential threats to the historic Mother Bethel burial ground beneath the Queen Village site. "Because the [burial ground] is public property, the executive, the mayor's office, is the one that has control of this right now," Certaine said. "The goal here is to stabilize" the site. "That shouldn't be a problem. " Concerned about documented sinkholes and cave-ins, as well as the presence of a 180-year-old water main that runs beneath Queen Street past the cemetery at Lawrence Street, the group met with Mayor Nutter's chief of staff, Everett Gillison, on Tuesday and asked that construction preparations be halted.
NEWS
February 20, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Education funding should be the Philadelphia business community's main priority if it wants to have a competitive workforce in the next decade, Mayor Nutter told the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday during his annual address. Nutter used a quarter of his time to argue for state school funding. "Quality education remains the greatest challenge Philadelphia faces in the 21st century," he said. Nutter called for a state funding formula based on the number of students in each district and their needs, such as learning disabilities and poverty.
SPORTS
February 18, 2014 | By Nick Carroll, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clearview wrestling won its first state championship in school history Sunday, beating Brick Memorial, 34-25, in the Group 3 final at Pine Belt Arena in Toms River, N.J. Zack Firestone (2 minutes, 36 seconds at 113 pounds), Mike VanBrill (2:21 at 132), and Kyle McMahon (0:18 at 170) each earned a pin en route to the championship. Mike's brother, John, improved to 29-0 this season with a 12-4 major decision at 145 pounds. Combined, the VanBrills are 57-0 this season. Firestone is also unbeaten at 29-0, and 152-pound Edward Lenkowski improved to 26-0 with a 4-0 win in the final.
NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Army 307th Military Police Company pulled up to a police station in the Shinwar district of Afghanistan in October 2011, a little white-and-brown spotted dog appeared. The soldiers, especially Sgt. T.J. Homan, began caring for the stray. The soldiers named her "Lil B," short for Little Beethoven because she looked like a Saint Bernard. Lil B eventually bonded with the 27-year-old Homan. The pup slept in his cot, snuggling with Homan and sometimes stealing a boot during the night.
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