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NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Term limits and taxes, pension reform and development projects, school funding and "low-wage workers" - these are the issues of interest to a new political nonprofit that hopes to shape Philadelphia City Council in this year's election and for years to come. The group wants answers from Council candidates. Just don't ask where the money is coming from. Philadelphia 3.0 went live Wednesday with a website featuring a questionnaire for candidates seeking support. Alison Perelman, the nonprofit's executive director, said the group will not disclose the names of donors seeking to influence the election.
REAL_ESTATE
March 2, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nora Lichtash has lived in Germantown for more than 40 years. Now she is pitching a development project there for affordable housing that would allow renters to convert their units into equity and home ownership. Lichtash's vehicle is a nonprofit known as the Women's Community Revitalization Project (WCRP). WCRP has operated in Philadelphia since 1987, and Lichtash has been director since 1990. In that time, the nonprofit has developed 250 affordable townhouses and apartments in all five counties of the region, investing about $4 million to date.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years after agreeing to submit to federal court monitoring of its controversial stop-and-frisk program, the Philadelphia Police Department has made little progress toward curbing unwarranted stops that disproportionately target minorities, according to an analysis filed Tuesday by a group of civil rights lawyers. The report found that 37 percent of the more than 200,000 pedestrian stops made by police in 2014 were done without reasonable suspicion of criminal activity - down from 47 percent from in 2012.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By John Moritz, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local public-access cable TV might be falling out of favor elsewhere in the country, but four months after the station serving Lower Merion Township and Narberth went dark, three groups are vying to revive it. George Strimel, who runs the public station in neighboring Radnor Township, has offered to take over Lower Merion's operation, not to be confused with the channels that carry public meetings. The Lower Merion Historical Society also is making a pitch, as is a King of Prussia group.
SPORTS
February 17, 2015 | By Nick Carroll, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Joe Fabrizio heard about it as soon as he transferred from Timber Creek to Delsea before last season. The curse. Delsea came into Sunday with five straight sectional titles and seven in eight years, but did not have a state championship to show for it. In his first year at Delsea, he remembered that coach Greg Sawyer simply told his wrestlers they had to be the ones to break through. This year that evolved into "no more. " Words were one thing, but when the 220-pound Fabrizio lifted Paramus' Michael Daniele over his head, slammed him to the mat at the floor of the Sun National Bank Center, and landed on top of him for the pin, that curse was on its way to being history.
SPORTS
February 11, 2015 | By Dwayne C. Nelson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rory Bushby won by pin in 1 minute, 22 seconds at 160 pounds to help host No. 3 seed Kingsway past No. 6 Moorestown, 59-12, Monday in the first round of the South Jersey Group 4 wrestling tournament. Atlee Cullison (113), Stanley Atkinson (145), Joe Massing (182), and Sean Calhoun (195) also added pins for Kingsway. Tyreek Smith had a pin at 220 for Moorestown. S.J. Group 1 First Round. Chad Watt's pin in 3:22 at 182 pounds gave Woodstown a lead, and the host No. 4 Wolverines held on to knock off No. 5 Schalick, 34-30.
TRAVEL
February 8, 2015 | By Chris Isaac, For The Inquirer
On my recent study abroad trip to Syracuse, Sicily, there were many incredible sights to see: the sparkling blue ocean that extended to the horizon, the picturesque Italian streets, and then there was me dancing shirtless with a belly dancer while my classmates cheered me on. It was our last night in Italy. We had bonded quite a bit throughout the week, and now we were forced to say goodbye to our tours of temples of Athena, puppet theaters, and the mime who cursed us out for being tourists.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Philadelphia School District says it would cost as much as $500 million to enroll 15,000 more students in new charter schools - about 20 times more than the amount offered by a private group. The Philadelphia School Partnership this week announced a gift of $25 million to the beleaguered school system to "take the cost issue off the table" and encourage the district to consider 39 charter applications on their merits alone. But were the SRC to add those charter seats, the price over six years would be much higher - if a fixed cost claimed by the district but disputed by PSP is used to do the math.
NEWS
February 7, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - A watchdog group led by a Democratic operative on Thursday asked the New Jersey State Ethics Commission to investigate whether Gov. Christie broke the law by allegedly accepting "gifts of foreign travel and lavish lodgings and entertainment" on his 2012 trip to Israel. The complaint comes after the New York Times reported Monday that Christie and his family flew to Israel on a private jet provided by the billionaire Sheldon Adelson while the Las Vegas casino magnate was lobbying against legislation that would ultimately legalize online gambling in New Jersey.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AN EDUCATION-advocacy group has pledged $35 million to help offset the cost of new charter schools in Philadelphia, the group announced yesterday. Philadelphia School Partnership said it hopes the money will allow the School Reform Commission to consider the 39 applications for new charters "purely on the merits" and eliminate concerns about the financial impact on the cash-strapped district. "There's no question that the way charters get funded in Pennsylvania is a flawed system, and there is somewhat of a negative financial impact for the district," PSP executive director Mark Gleason told the Daily News . PSP said the highest-performing charter operators have proposed 11,000 new seats over the next three years, which it estimates would cost the district an extra $22 million.
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