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SPORTS
August 16, 2014 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
As one of eight seniors on the roster, running back Kenneth Harper knows the day is coming when the uniform he'll wear won't be Temple football's, but something more appropriate for the workforce. To get ready for that, Harper, a finance major from Gainesville, Fla., who last season led the Owls in rushing yards (613) and touchdowns (11), interned over the summer here with PNC Bank. "I worked on high-net-worth accounts," Harper said. "Asset management and portfolio management, stocks, bonds, and mutual funds, and things like that.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A study that said more money has not helped city schools is flawed and presents a skewed picture of the Philadelphia School District's reality, a local nonprofit says. The conservative Commonwealth Foundation said in an analysis released earlier this month that while the system's budget had grown over the past decade, its students were still struggling, and that "serious reform" was needed to fix the city's schools. But Research for Action, a Philadelphia-based organization whose mission is to strengthen public schools, found the Commonwealth Foundation brief "misleading, inaccurate, and devoid of context needed for an informed understanding of what is happening in the city's schools.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
HUMAN NATURE is a vocal quartet consisting of four white young men from suburban Sydney, Australia, whose stock-in-trade is the Motown Records canon of the 1960s and '70s. As such, it's easy to dismiss the unit, which tonight begins a two-weekend run at Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa. After all, how could these guys do justice to music made by African-Americans before, in some cases, they were even born? If you agree with those sentiments, we suggest you take it up with Smokey Robinson - yes, that Smokey Robinson, the one who wrote and sang some of the most enduring songs in pop-music history.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do individuals have a responsibility to help shape America's image in a deeply troubled world? Mostly definitely, says Nancy Gilboy, president of Citizen Diplomacy International of Philadelphia. Founded amid the Cold War in 1954, the organization, which serves as a bridge among companies, governments, foreign groups, and individuals, is celebrating its 60th year with a new name - and an increasingly urgent mission to spur citizen participation. In the 1950s, when people abroad thought of America, they might conjure "the U.S. soldier who liberated [Europe]
NEWS
August 5, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite its failure to acquire the Lumberton property where it hoped to create a homeless shelter, the president of Citizens Serving the Homeless Inc. says her organization is still looking to create a large homeless facility in Burlington County. "Oh, definitely," Madelyn Mears-Sheldon said last week, adding that in February the county counted 1,660 homeless persons, the third-highest number in all the state's counties. "We've looked at three sites and found two that are definite possibilities" since the Lumberton deal fell through in June, she said.
REAL_ESTATE
August 4, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia needs more low-income housing for veterans, particularly those who served in recent conflicts such as the Gulf War, says Walter Kubiak of Mission First Housing Group. Kubiak, a Vietnam veteran, knows that vets often have mental-health issues that don't manifest themselves for years, and that they may then have trouble finding housing. "We have a lot of young people in Philadelphia who've spent years in combat under incredible stress," he said. "They come back with head injuries that would have killed them in previous wars.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
PhillyNORML says it has started an e-mail campaign that is flooding Mayor Nutter's inbox with messages supporting a City Council-passed marijuana bill. The campaign aims to ratchet up the pressure on Nutter to sign into law a measure that would make possessing a small amount of pot punishable by only a $25 fine, with no arrest. And it's happening as increasing rhetoric over the bill flies at the mayor: Earlier this week, City Councilman James F. Kenney sent a letter to Nutter saying 264 citizens had reportedly been arrested since Council approved the bill on June 19, and arguing that "every day Mayor Nutter fails to act, more young people will be ... jailed for a minimal offense.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The party's over - the local tea party is, anyway. One of the Philadelphia region's most prominent branches of the tea party movement is removing from its title all allegiances to the political splinter group, its leaders announced Friday in front of Independence Hall. Expressing confidence in Republicans' chances in congressional races this fall, what had been the Independence Hall Tea Party Association - now the Independence Hall Foundation - said it would replace campaigning and political fund-raising with a more educational and outreach-based approach to its policy goals.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't just "hundreds of dollars," City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson now acknowledges. It was just over $10,000. But he still says that all the money donated to his Peace Not Guns group was handled honestly, if somewhat sloppily, and that critics of its unauthorized use of a federal charity designation are missing the point. "The mission of Peace Not Guns is pure," the Philadelphia councilman said during a recent interview. To make his case about the antiviolence organization, which he often trumpets as the cornerstone of 15 years of community service, he invited a reporter to sift through a color-coded chart and 70 pages of documents spread across a conference table in his lawyer's office.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
As Gov. Christie prepares to head to Iowa later this week, a conservative group opposed to his judicial record is targeting voters there with an online ad campaign saying that the New Jersey governor "broke his promise" to reshape the state Supreme Court. A 90-second spot from the Judicial Crisis Network describes New Jersey's high court as "one of the most activist courts in the nation," issuing rulings that have "wreaked havoc on state finances, driven away business, and jeopardized jobs.
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