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LIVING
September 4, 1998 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's not hip to admit it, but the Dishwalla concert on Tuesday at the Theater of Living Arts wasn't half bad. Much as new wavers once delivered their palatable derivation of punk to the suburban masses, Dishwalla takes the venom out of grunge's dirty bite and offers it up to rebellious but not disenfranchised youth (and a few critics enjoying a guilty pleasure). The group's overblown songs might seem strange to more mature ears, but they successfully address the self-importance of teenagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If Wednesday night's sold out show at the Trocadero had been the final exam in a high school course, Pearl Jam 101, Silverchair would have earned a perfect score. Daniel Johns, the 16-year-old leader of the Australian grunge trio, has that angst-ridden, stentorian bellow down. He gives good Eddie. Plus, the stringy-haired blond "looks just like Kurt," as one typically enraptured teen enthused. Indeed, Johns and his 15-year-old buddies, bassist Chris Joannou and drummer Ben Gillies, have studied hard at the school of Seattle grunge.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1996 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Stabbing squalls of grunge guitar attended the opening number, "Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black)" at the Waterfront Entertertainment Centre in Camden Friday night. It was an exquisite gesture from the "godfather of grunge," Neil Young, reunited with his longtime collaborators in Crazy Horse for this tour. Exquisite, because it both mocked the overblown, uninspired nature of much current grunge and simultaneously transcended it. It also served as paean to the work of Kurt Cobain, whose suicide note contained a line from the song: "It's better to burn out, than to fade away.
NEWS
September 4, 1994 | By Sofia Yank Bassman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Even on a good day - with faces scrubbed, stickup hair tamed, and Sunday- go-to-church clothes on - we four in the Bassman family would never be mistaken for one of those windswept, blond, nuclear groupings who live in the Polo ads. No, at best, individually and collectively, we get by. Barely. What can we say about a father who regularly wears jeans and old T-shirts to work? A mother allergic to skirts and stockings? Two sons, ages 9 and 6, who follow in the family tradition where blazers and rep ties are saved for special occasions when their father has to see clients or go to a funeral?
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The informative documentary "Hype" explains that grunge music, to paraphrase Mark Twain, isn't as bad as it sounds. That's an achievement, given the current state of grunge music, where atonal moping has become the dominant form of expression. Songs include "I'm Only Happy When It Rains," "Blow Up the Outside World," and the one where the guy sings "Do You Wanna Die?" over and over. What kind of question is that? And whatever happened to "Do You Wanna Dance?" The answer lies in "Hype," which traces grunge back to its early 1980s roots in Seattle, where, we are shocked to discover, the people playing it and the people listening to it were actually having fun. The Seattle area was teeming with spunky garage bands, all contributing to a vibrant and organic regional music scene.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Few artists within the pop idiom toy with expectations like Erin McKeown. Since 1999, the lesbian singer, composer and guitarist has kept her audiences guessing. She moved first from quirky melodic folk with Beat-inspired lyrics to hard pop. No sooner were audiences accustomed to her confessional lyrics and punky guitar jolts, than did she commence, earlier this year, with a set of Tin Pan Alley covers done as surf, jazz and ambient electronica. So why not follow up Lafayette - a richly appointed big band live record released two weeks ago - with a sold out World Cafe Live show on Friday featuring a tiny power trio that reconfigured her renowned jazzy lullaby into the stuff of chunky funky grunge?
NEWS
December 28, 2012
KWANZAA IS A time for unity, when communities come together and reflect on their common heritage. This weekend, the African American Museum in Philadelphia will do just that with a full schedule of Kwanzaa-related events. The holiday is usually celebrated over a week - Wednesday through Jan. 1 this year - with each day representing one of the seven principles of African heritage. Saturday is Ujamaa, the day of cooperative economics, and Sunday is Nia, the day of purpose. Among the events Saturday is a session on the African diaspora and black genealogy with the African-American Genealogy Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1993 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
From the very first line of Nirvana's third album, In Utero, which arrives in stores today, the message is clear: Kurt Cobain's circumstances have changed. "Teenage angst has paid off well, now I'm bored and old," Cobain sings on the embittered "Serve the Servants," his disinterested tone miles from the usual paint-peeling shriek. Could he be offering a report to shareholders on the success of his band's once-humble endeavor? Or is he commenting, derisively, on the way the astonishing Nevermind, the 1991 album that brought grunge to the mainstream and went on to sell more than 9 million copies, was analyzed to excess and held up as an all-purpose explanation of the twentysomething generation?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1997 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Wow! If you weren't thunderstruck and thoroughly spent on Saturday night, you probably weren't at the Theatre of Living Arts. Portland-based grunge survivors Everclear tore through 20 songs in 80 minutes and didn't hint at a dull moment - hint being the operative word - until the 13th, "I Will Buy You a New Life. For all of its post-punk aesthetic, the band seemed eager to please. Frontman Art Alexakis promised - and delivered - plenty of Sparkle & Fade: That 1995 breakthrough album made up half of the show.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | by Sara Sherr For the Daily News
Pretend for a minute you live in Seattle, circa 1992. Imagine that a camera stuck in your face or a journalist asking you to explain "grunge" and your slacker lifestyle are as commonplace as rain and latte. Now imagine you are the guy behind the camera, "Hype!" director Doug Pray. Pray admits that initially media-weary Seattlelites were resistant to him and his camera. Nirvana was exploding, and groups like Soundgarden, Pearl Jam and Alice in Chains were following suit. The lifestyle that surrounded the music had become bigger than the music itself: Flannel was on the fashion runways and irony was commonplace in automobile ad campaigns.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
L7's tenure ended just as the Internet began to dominate culture. But it was the Internet that ended up reviving L7. The L.A. punk-metal band's run lasted from 1985 to 2001, influencing the riot grrrl bands of the early 1990s without reaching the same heights as their grunge (and often male) contemporaries. The reunited L7 plays the Trocadero Theatre on Friday night. Around 2013, when L7 singer and guitarist Donita Sparks started to post videos and pictures on L7's official Facebook page in an effort to digitize her archives, she wasn't thinking about a reunion.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Amid Soundgarden reunions, TV appearances by Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder, and the constant hype around Nirvana - and, by extension, everything Dave Grohl does via the Foo Fighters, documentary filmmaking, and comic bits on the coming FX series Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll - you could miss another classic band out of Seattle: Mudhoney. Formed in 1988, singer/instrumentalist Mark Arm's Mudhoney lighted the way for the aforementioned acts, with a primordial garage-punk feel and sludgy heavy-metal sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
As November draws to a close, the pop music schedule is getting busy in Atlantic City casino showrooms. This weekend, there's a red-headed Rock and Roll Hall of Fame slide guitarist at Caesars and a formidable blues and gospel double bill at Harrah's. On Thanksgiving weekend, the action includes a veteran grunge front man teamed with an intriguing, fresh-faced folkie, a smooth R&B triple bill, and one of the all-time great interpreters of the American songbook. Here's the lineup: Robert Cray and Mavis Staples.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
KWANZAA IS A time for unity, when communities come together and reflect on their common heritage. This weekend, the African American Museum in Philadelphia will do just that with a full schedule of Kwanzaa-related events. The holiday is usually celebrated over a week - Wednesday through Jan. 1 this year - with each day representing one of the seven principles of African heritage. Saturday is Ujamaa, the day of cooperative economics, and Sunday is Nia, the day of purpose. Among the events Saturday is a session on the African diaspora and black genealogy with the African-American Genealogy Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012
Mark Lanegan "If tears were liquor, I'd have drunk myself sick," Mark Lanegan sings on "St. Louis Elegy," one of several chillingly effective downers on the enveloping Blues Funeral, the first solo album since 2004 from the Pacific Northwest grunge tough guy. The Screaming Trees and Queens of the Stone Age veteran has done excellent work with collaborators Isobel Campbell and Greg Dulli in recent years, and he maintains his minor-key winning...
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | BY GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
IN ITS GLORY DAYS as a burlesque house, the Trocadero Theatre in Chinatown ran ads describing performers like Shanda Lear ("lights up our stage"), Lynn Oleum ("she'll floor you"), Jerri Toll ("for men with tired blood") and Della K. Tessen ("a delicious platter"). Yesterday, the Troc, on Arch Street near 10th, a former strip joint that started as an opera house and is now a venue for grunge bands, described itself as bankrupt and specifically asked for protection from Ticketmaster. Its operators, Joon Associates Inc., and president Joanna Pang filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in federal court in Philadelphia, seeking a "breathing spell" from creditors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The Good Dog Bar is one tough pub to follow. There is that legendary blue-cheese-stuffed burger, of course, so good that it inspired me to haiku and song. But there is also such an elusive aura of perfected grunge in its cozy rowhouse bones, patinaed by generations of drinkers, that it could never be duplicated. It's "that ancient falling-down character," says co-owner Dave Garry wistfully. He even speaks of the Good Dog's perpetually vandalized toilets with measured fondness. (Well, sort of)
NEWS
July 13, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Nickelback, the critically despised, audience-adored quartet that packed Camden's Susquehanna Center on Saturday, has found a way to mash the soft rock and hair metal of the '80s and the grunge and emo of the '90s into something that's sold more than 30 million albums. Seems the cash-outs have gotten better for these post-grunge Canadian dudes who named their band after cheap tippers from one member's first job at Starbucks. With his shouted-out, sullen lyrical platitudes and his hair in full flipping mode, Chad Kroeger made for an odd front man. He scuffed up his clarion-clear vocals as though mangling silk with Brillo pads.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
My favorite contemporary acronym is CWOT (Complete Waste of Time). Would that reviews could be four letters long. But since they can't, here's the story on Whiskey Neat by Bruce Walsh, presented by Azuka Theatre, which has, frequently and formerly, done strong, interesting work under the talented direction of Kevin Glaccum: A manipulative guy called Handsome (Luigi Sottile, who is) applies for a job as a valet parker and lands the coveted big-tip Saturday night slot. The repulsive boss, a violent brute named Tommy (Nathan Emmons, who doesn't quite fit the description of a man who could throw a Cadillac over a roof)
NEWS
October 28, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Throughout the '80s and '90s, if you were a glammy metalhead or a pretty punk who didn't purchase your wear at Warrior, the clothing and piercing boutique on Bustleton Avenue, you didn't rock. Billy Idol, Michael Jackson and Cyndi Lauper all wore owner Carl Werbock's edgiest designs - from fringed suede to studded leather and beyond. Local metal bands from Heaven's Edge to Cinderella often hit him up for custom-made gear, to wear on-stage and off. In the last decade, the store expanded to locations in Levittown and South Street, becoming a haven for those seeking safe, sterile piercings.
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