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BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
iPipeline, an insurance-software maker based in Exton, is the latest suburban tech firm to add a Center City office in hopes of luring young engineers, programmers, and information-technology salespeople. The firm, which employs 390 in the Philadelphia area and its U.S. and foreign offices, and hopes to add 50 more this year, has leased a suite on the 33d floor at 1818 Market St., a 40-story building soon to be known as Beneficial Place, the new headquarters for the city's largest remaining bank.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Raghunandan Yandamuri said he never intended to kill or harm anyone. The Montgomery County man told detectives that he simply wanted to kidnap 10-month-old Saanvi Venna for ransom. What happened next, he said, was "unexpected. " First Assistant District Attorney Kevin Steele, however, said Yandamuri acted quite deliberately. Motivated by gambling debts, he was carrying a four-inch kitchen knife to kill the child's grandmother and a note that demanded $50,000 and threatened to have the baby "cut into pieces.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
What makes a company valuable? In the stock markets, where software writers, oil refiners, toy-makers and bomb builders compete for the same investor dollars, it doesn't matter what you make, or even how much you sell; it's how much profit investors expect you're going to keep that determines share prices. Thirteen Philadelphia-area companies rank on the Standard & Poor's list of 500 big publicly traded corporations. The most valuable is Comcast Corp. , the Philadelphia-based cable TV, Internet and phone company, which earned $2.5 billion on gross sales of $25 billion last year, and was worth $64 billion - based on the price Wall Street assigns to its shares - on the Nasdaq Stock Market at the start of November.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2011 | By Mike Armstrong, Inquirer Columnist
Breakup fees have been on my mind lately, and I'm not referring to what it may cost the Governator to end his marriage to Maria Shriver . Breakup fees, which in legalese are termination fees, are a part of many corporate acquisitions. They're the price for walking away from a deal. You can see why buyers and sellers want them. Who wants to spend all that time evaluating and negotiating a deal if the buyer can't close it or the seller opts for a better offer from someone else?
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raghunandan Yandamuri said he never intended to kill or harm anyone. The Montgomery County man told detectives that he simply wanted to kidnap 10-month-old Saanvi Venna for ransom. What happened next, he said, was "unexpected. " First Assistant District Attorney Kevin Steele, however, said Yandamuri acted quite deliberately. Motivated by gambling debts, he was carrying a four-inch kitchen knife to kill the child's grandmother and a note that demanded $50,000 and threatened to have the baby "cut into pieces.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2006 | By Rebecca Carroll and Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
When Nicole St. Julien-Thomas hears her alarm buzzing each morning, she doesn't have to worry about her work outfit, traffic jams or office politics. She just picks up the phone, logs on to her computer at home in Gloucester County, and starts fielding customer service calls. St. Julien-Thomas is homeshoring, a new and expanding practice that allows customer service agents to work from home instead of in centralized call centers. Some large American companies are even bringing some of their customer-service operations back from India, the Philippines, and other offshore locations to take advantage of homeshoring.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Who are these guys? The new 76ers owners, who purchased the team from Comcast-Spectacor , include overlapping circles of University of Pennsylvania grads, Philly natives, and Wall Street moguls who got rich during (and after) the long economic boom that crashed in 2008. Plus Hollywood people. A couple of veteran sports businessmen. And the Indonesians. As a group they are led by Wharton School grads Joshua Harris, a founder of Apollo Global Management L.L.C.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not surprising when firms that sell investments issue bullish reports early in the year, urging investors to buy more stocks. But it's still interesting to see just what the pros who follow companies, prices, and markets are peddling, and how the list mutated since last time. Janney Capital Markets , the investment and research arm of Philadelphia's Janney Montgomery Scott L.L.C. , the largest locally based brokerage, is pitching 24 "Best Idea" stocks for 2011, some of which fall into a category we might call "post-recessionary.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2013
FMC Corp. , Philadelphia, named Thomas Schneberger vice president, global business director of Alkali Chemicals. He had been global sustainability director. Linda Froelich has been named director of global sustainability. She had been global stewardship manager, overseeing Agricultural Solutions' product stewardship programs. James C. Krieg has joined the Rothman Institute at Jefferson as chief of orthopedic trauma and fracture care and professor of orthopedic surgery at Jefferson Medical College.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2010
Securities trades recently reported to the Securities and Exchange Commission by officers, directors, and principal shareholders of corporations based or having sizable employment in the Philadelphia area. Titles are as reported to the SEC. A.C. Moore Arts & Crafts Inc. Joseph A. Jeffries , chief operating officer, bought 4,500 shares at $2.80 May 14 and now directly holds 153,542 shares. David Ross Stern , chief financial officer, bought 5,374 shares at $2.79 May 24 and now directly holds 109,220 shares.
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