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NEWS
October 5, 1994 | By Maureen Graham and Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
This past summer, Gloucester County Roads Superintendent Joseph LaPorta looked the county freeholders in the eye and told them that even though his personal records had been subpoenaed by the FBI, he was not a target of a federal investigation. On Monday, LaPorta and two others were named in a 19-count indictment charging LaPorta with bribery and money-laundering in connection with a scheme involving GTECH, a Rhode Island firm that manages the state lottery. LaPorta said in an interview yesterday that he had told the truth and that he was "shocked" on hearing of his indictment.
NEWS
January 31, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
What is probably Gloucester County's longest-running personnel dispute became longer yesterday when Gloucester County Superior Court Judge Samuel DeSimone ruled that county freeholders should hold a hearing on whether to reinstate suspended highways director Joe LaPorta. LaPorta, who sued the county for his reinstatement earlier this month, had hoped DeSimone would order the freeholders to give him his job back. In 1994, LaPorta was suspended without pay from his roughly $66,000-a-year job following his indictment on 20 federal counts in a case involving the GTech lottery company.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | By Maureen Graham and Mary Beth Warner, FOR THE INQUIRER
Fresh from his acquittal in the Gtech fraud case, suspended Gloucester County highways director Joseph LaPorta said yesterday that he wanted to return to his job. "I'm going to fight to get my old job back," LaPorta, 57, of Monroe Township, said in an interview. "I was innocent . . . when the Board of Freeholders denied me due process. Now I've been proven innocent. " LaPorta was exonerated Oct. 4 of all charges in the lottery scandal. A federal jury convicted LaPorta's business partner, Steven Dandrea, and J. David Smith, the former national sales manager of Gtech Holdings Corp.
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With less than two weeks until their much-anticipated hearing on whether to fire suspended highway director Joe LaPorta, the Gloucester County freeholders voted last night to name former Camden County Superior Court Judge Barry M. Weinberg as the hearing officer. Earlier this month, attorneys for the freeholder board filed a list of what they believe are 19 grounds for LaPorta's dismissal, ranging from using county time to do personal politicking to whether he misinformed the FBI during his trial on federal corruption charges.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joe LaPorta won't know if he'll get his old job back until after Christmas. For the second time in two weeks, the Gloucester County Board of Freeholders met last night to decide the fate of the suspended county highway director, but no decision was made as to his reinstatement. "The board is very anxious to resolve this," said Gloucester County counsel Bruce Hasbrouck, adding that the freeholders used the closed-door session "to talk and look at it in terms of legal matters.
NEWS
October 6, 1994 | By Maureen Graham and Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer correspondent Karla Hawarth contributed to this article
A federal investigation into kickbacks surrounding a proposed state lottery contract has widened to include a consultant to a pay phone company with contracts throughout the state, according to law enforcement sources familiar with the probe. The FBI is examining whether Steven Dandrea, who was indicted Monday in the lottery investigation, may have engineered kickbacks in connection with contracts he helped arrange for Public Phones of Pleasantville, the sources said. Dandrea said yesterday that, in his capacity as a consultant to Public Phones, he introduced the company to numerous governments and businesses throughout the state, including Camden County but was unaware of any investigation.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After four months, Joe LaPorta said he was tired of waiting. So yesterday he filed a motion in Gloucester County Superior Court, asking that the county show cause as to why he should not be reinstated to his job as county roads supervisor. LaPorta was suspended without pay by the county Board of Freeholders in 1994 following his indictment on 20 federal counts of bribery, money laundering, fraud and conspiracy in the GTech scandal. Last October, he was acquitted of all charges.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer correspondent Natalie Pompilio contributed to this article
After months of hemming and hawing on both sides, a decision in the case of Joe LaPorta is nearing. Maybe. Last week, LaPorta decided to take Gloucester County to court - for the second time since his 1994 suspension as the county's roads supervisor. This week, with his court date rapidly approaching, the Gloucester County freeholders have called a special meeting tomorrow. And yesterday, at the behest of county officials, LaPorta's court date was pushed back a week, to Jan. 30. The goal of tomorrow's meeting - which will be a closed session - is to go over material that will be presented by Steve Trimboli, a special counsel from Livingston, who was hired by the county to investigate the transcript of LaPorta's trial, other new materials on LaPorta's work in the county, and his lawsuit.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On the seventh day of his reinstatement hearing, Joseph L. LaPorta yesterday wrapped up his defense against charges of misconduct during 15 years as the Gloucester County roads supervisor. LaPorta, 59, of Monroe, who was suspended from his $66,000-a-year job and wants it back, testified that the 19 counts set forth by the county as reasons for his dismissal were bogus. Among other charges, he stands accused of neglecting his Highway Department duties, using county equipment and employees to perform personal tasks, fabricating financial-disclosure statements, and improperly engaging in land transactions with vendors who did business with county offices.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | By Karla Haworth, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph LaPorta, the Gloucester County roads director suspended without pay last fall after being indicted on federal charges of bribery, conspiracy and fraud, has filed suit against the county and county freeholders, demanding to be reinstated to his $66,000-a-year job. The lawsuit, filed Monday in Gloucester County Superior Court in Woodbury, also seeks compensation for lost pay since Oct. 19, legal fees, and "other relief. " Based on the 14th Amendment, which prohibits states from depriving a person of life, liberty or property without due process, the suit was filed only six weeks after federal indictments similar to LaPorta's were dismissed by a U.S. District Judge in Kentucky.
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