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NEWS
February 6, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Leaders of Iran's reformist parliament conceded defeat yesterday in their effort to overturn a ban on reformist candidates in the Feb. 20 parliamentary election. The leaders said the Guardian Council - an unelected oversight body dominated by religious hard-liners - had reneged on an agreement worked out in talks led by Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on Wednesday to reinstate a list of 600 candidates. The council insists the more than 2,000 barred candidates were unfit for office.
NEWS
February 21, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iran's ruling clerics used nationalist sentiment and anti-American propaganda yesterday to woo voters to the polls for controversial parliamentary elections. Who won will not be known for several days, but the odds favor religious rulers seeking to crush a popular move to secularize Iran. The slate of candidates was heavily weighted toward the conservatives after the powerful Guardian Council, whose members are unelected religious clerics, banned more than 2,300 mostly reformist candidates from running.
NEWS
February 4, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, refused yesterday to delay this month's parliamentary elections, fueling reports that reformist President Mohammad Khatami will quit. Khatami's cabinet will discuss the expected resignation at a regularly scheduled meeting today, after which the president probably will deliver a statement, supporters said. Another top-ranked politician, Parliament Speaker Mehdi Karrubi, who made an impassioned public plea to Khamenei on Sunday to postpone the election, is expected to announce that he won't seek reelection.
NEWS
February 2, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Reformist lawmakers castigated Iran's most powerful council of clerics in a legislative session carried live yesterday on state-run radio, then quit en masse to protest the religious rulers' sweeping ban of liberal parliamentary candidates in this month's elections. "They turned our Islam into the Islam of the Taliban," resigning lawmaker Rajab Ali Mazrouie contended during the unprecedented rebuke of the hard-line Islamic Council of Guardians. "Elections whose results are predetermined violate the rights and ideals of the nation.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a Rutgers University professor win over voters in his homeland and be elected the next president of Iran? Hooshang Amirahmadi, of Rutgers' Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy in New Brunswick, says his candidacy is a serious attempt to build bridges between the Islamic republic and the United States, where he has spent four decades. But experts call him a long shot at best. "Who can they find better than me as a peacemaker - someone who understands American language, Iranian language, American culture, Iranian culture, and can go back and forth?"
NEWS
January 31, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iran's conservative ruling clerics yesterday refused to reinstate more than two-thirds of the candidates they had banned from running for parliament and vetoed a government recommendation that next month's elections be postponed. The final ruling by the Islamic Council of Guardians was announced on state-run television. It leaves President Mohammed Khatami's pro-reform government with a difficult choice: Follow through with threats of mass resignations and an election boycott or lose credibility with the Iranian public.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran began registering potential candidates Saturday for March 2 parliamentary elections, a vote that will be especially hard fought between supporters and opponents of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad within the conservative camp. Iran's major reformist groups are staying out of the race, contending that basic requirements for free and fair elections have not been met. In their absence, the poll for the 290-seat assembly is likely to pit hard-line candidates who remain staunchly loyal to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei against conservatives who back Ahmadinejad.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Ken Moritsugu INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iranian President Mohammad Khatami yesterday disputed President Bush's assertion that his tough stance against terrorism drove Iran to agree to U.N. inspections of its nuclear sites. Bush, in his State of the Union address Tuesday night, cited agreements by Iran and Libya to give up their nuclear-weapons efforts as evidence of the success of his foreign policy. "I do not accept what he said," Khatami said at a news conference. "All the noise and fanfare of the United States didn't have any impact on our decision.
NEWS
February 20, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Pro-democracy leaders in Iran face huge - but possibly not insurmountable - obstacles to maintaining their majority in today's parliamentary elections. A sizable turnout in this city near the Caspian Sea, and in two dozen other small cities that escaped a ban on liberal candidates, could allow the reformers to keep their majority in the 290-seat parliament. The odds, nonetheless, are against the reformers after the unelected clerics who make up the powerful Guardian Council banned more than 2,300 mostly reformist candidates from running.
NEWS
February 5, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iran's president and its most powerful cleric reached a deal yesterday that would reinstate many reform candidates who were blacklisted from this month's parliamentary elections. The deal promises to defuse a growing political crisis in Iran, in which more than a third of the parliament resigned and threatened to boycott the Feb. 20 vote. Provincial governors appointed by the reform-minded president were threatening to halt the elections in defiance of the ruling clerics. Many candidates would still be barred from the ballot under the deal, and it was unclear whether the elections would appear credible enough to win acceptance from a public that has grown disillusioned with Iran's political system, in which unelected clerics hold supreme power and can overrule the president and parliament.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Can a Rutgers University professor win over voters in his homeland and be elected the next president of Iran? Hooshang Amirahmadi, of Rutgers' Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy in New Brunswick, says his candidacy is a serious attempt to build bridges between the Islamic republic and the United States, where he has spent four decades. But experts call him a long shot at best. "Who can they find better than me as a peacemaker - someone who understands American language, Iranian language, American culture, Iranian culture, and can go back and forth?"
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Ali Akbar Dareini, Associated Press
TEHRAN, Iran - Iran began registering potential candidates Saturday for March 2 parliamentary elections, a vote that will be especially hard fought between supporters and opponents of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad within the conservative camp. Iran's major reformist groups are staying out of the race, contending that basic requirements for free and fair elections have not been met. In their absence, the poll for the 290-seat assembly is likely to pit hard-line candidates who remain staunchly loyal to Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei against conservatives who back Ahmadinejad.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | By Gwynne Dyer
It doesn't make sense. In the previous two presidential elections, in 1997 and 2001, Iranians voted more than two-to-one for the reformist candidate, Mohammed Khatami. It did them little good, of course, because the Islamist clerics who have veto power over the elected parts of the Iranian government blocked his attempts to liberalize the system. But it seemed clear that younger Iranians in particular were fed up with clerical domination of politics and the corruption, incompetence and oppression it fostered.
NEWS
June 8, 2005 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
The people of this sleepy town near the Iraqi border flocked to the Grand Mosque on Saturday to hear would-be reformer Mostafa Moin make his case for why he should be the next president of Iran. Children shouted and waved, and drivers honked in greeting as Moin's orange bus, plastered with posters promising an "Iran for all Iranians," rumbled past. But as impressed as the residents of Susangerd were to see Moin - the only one of Iran's eight presidential candidates to campaign here - many said they saw no point in voting for him. That despite the fact that the town overwhelmingly supported another reformer, Mohammad Khatami, during his two successful runs for the presidency.
NEWS
February 21, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iran's ruling clerics used nationalist sentiment and anti-American propaganda yesterday to woo voters to the polls for controversial parliamentary elections. Who won will not be known for several days, but the odds favor religious rulers seeking to crush a popular move to secularize Iran. The slate of candidates was heavily weighted toward the conservatives after the powerful Guardian Council, whose members are unelected religious clerics, banned more than 2,300 mostly reformist candidates from running.
NEWS
February 20, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Pro-democracy leaders in Iran face huge - but possibly not insurmountable - obstacles to maintaining their majority in today's parliamentary elections. A sizable turnout in this city near the Caspian Sea, and in two dozen other small cities that escaped a ban on liberal candidates, could allow the reformers to keep their majority in the 290-seat parliament. The odds, nonetheless, are against the reformers after the unelected clerics who make up the powerful Guardian Council banned more than 2,300 mostly reformist candidates from running.
NEWS
February 6, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Leaders of Iran's reformist parliament conceded defeat yesterday in their effort to overturn a ban on reformist candidates in the Feb. 20 parliamentary election. The leaders said the Guardian Council - an unelected oversight body dominated by religious hard-liners - had reneged on an agreement worked out in talks led by Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, on Wednesday to reinstate a list of 600 candidates. The council insists the more than 2,000 barred candidates were unfit for office.
NEWS
February 5, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Abduction suspect jailed; 11-year-old still missing The nationwide search for a tattooed thug who was videotaped kidnapping 11-year-old Carlie Brucia ended last night when Florida cops found him - in the Sarasota County jail. But the sixth-grader Joseph Smith allegedly abducted on Sunday was still missing. The FBI was scouring Smith's battered 1992 Buick station wagon for clues to Carlie's whereabouts. Smith, 37, a father of three and former Brooklyn resident, was arrested Tuesday on cocaine possession charges.
NEWS
February 5, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iran's president and its most powerful cleric reached a deal yesterday that would reinstate many reform candidates who were blacklisted from this month's parliamentary elections. The deal promises to defuse a growing political crisis in Iran, in which more than a third of the parliament resigned and threatened to boycott the Feb. 20 vote. Provincial governors appointed by the reform-minded president were threatening to halt the elections in defiance of the ruling clerics. Many candidates would still be barred from the ballot under the deal, and it was unclear whether the elections would appear credible enough to win acceptance from a public that has grown disillusioned with Iran's political system, in which unelected clerics hold supreme power and can overrule the president and parliament.
NEWS
February 4, 2004 | By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, refused yesterday to delay this month's parliamentary elections, fueling reports that reformist President Mohammad Khatami will quit. Khatami's cabinet will discuss the expected resignation at a regularly scheduled meeting today, after which the president probably will deliver a statement, supporters said. Another top-ranked politician, Parliament Speaker Mehdi Karrubi, who made an impassioned public plea to Khamenei on Sunday to postpone the election, is expected to announce that he won't seek reelection.
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