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NEWS
March 23, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 60 year old pizzeria owner from Telford who was beaten to death in February 2009 was murdered by an illegal immigrant who fled to his native Guatemala and later died in a construction site accident, Montgomery County district attorney Risa Vetri Ferman announced Wednesday. Antonino Lombardo, owner of Lisa's Pizza was killed by Jose Antonio Pais, 35, who had worked at a pizza shop owned by Lombardo's daughter and son-in-law. Pais had been fired and was no longer working for the family at the time of the murder.
NEWS
April 9, 1986 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just about one year ago, Nick Blake, a free-lance journalist originally from Philadelphia, strapped on a knapsack and hiked into the lush highlands of Guatemala. He and another American were searching for a story that had eluded other journalists, a story about a reclusive guerrilla army. The two never hiked out. They were reported missing on April 8, 1985. The U.S. Embassy undertook an investigation, which was inconclusive. Guatemalan officials said they knew nothing. To Blake's affluent family in Chestnut Hill, the official response appeared to be a hasty dismissal.
NEWS
June 9, 2011
An illegal immigrant wanted in a triple homicide in Guatemala was arrested Wednesday in Bensalem Township. Bensalem police said officers and an FBI task force apprehended Neftaci De Jesus Ortega, 26, without incident on homicide charges at 2:45 p.m. Wednesday. The FBI Bucks County Violent Gang Task Force had been following up leads to find Ortega, who is accused in Guatemala of having gunned down a father, a mother, and a child in March, police said. A second child was injured but survived by pretending to be dead, authorities said.
NEWS
August 26, 1986 | By Stephen F. Gold
In recent months, congressional attention and public debate have focused almost exclusively on two Central American countries, Nicaragua and El Salvador. Guatemala has rarely been mentioned, even though nearly $100 million in foreign aid will be sent there this year with congressional blessings. Recent events in Guatemala would indicate that closer scrutiny is needed to determine for what ends our money will be used. Since 1954, when the United States overthrew the democratically elected government of President Jacobo Arbenz, Guatemala has been ruled by despotic military juntas.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Curt Anderson, Associated Press
MIAMI - Antivirus software founder John McAfee arrived in the United States on Wednesday night after being deported from Guatemala, where he had sought to evade police questioning in the killing of a man in neighboring Belize. The American Airlines commercial jet carrying McAfee landed in Miami shortly before 7 p.m. Wednesday, said Miami International Airport spokesman Greg Chin. A short time later, a posting on McAfee's website announced that he was at a hotel in Miami's upscale South Beach neighborhood.
NEWS
April 8, 1995 | By Jonathan Power
Back in 1981 on assignment in Guatemala - the country that, according to Amnesty International, had the worst human rights record in torture-riddled Latin America - I wrote a column that began "Guatemala is not a banana republic. The days when the United Fruit Company, furious at being deprived of its banana estates by a reform-minded government in the 1950s, could expect the CIA to help overthrow the president, are long gone. " How wrong I was. We now learn the CIA had been there all along, and President Clinton has opened an investigation to find out why, and on whose authority.
NEWS
October 13, 1987 | BY PAUL MULSHINE
The guerillas promised the mountain villagers of Guatemala cars, salaries without jobs and even airplanes. I heard this from Mariano Cano, who lives in this 10,000-foot-high village with his wife and six children. He laughed as he told the story, as if picturing in his mind a brand-new Mercedes trying to negotiate the three-foot- wide mudslide that constitutes the main highway into the valley. In the early '80s, the guerillas stopped talking and made their big push. The villagers didn't stick around to wait for the car keys.
NEWS
January 13, 2009 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 20-year-old Dickinson College student from Philadelphia apparently drowned Saturday afternoon while on a school trip to Guatemala to help repair hurricane-ravaged adobe classrooms, college officials said. Nathaniel "Nate" Kirkland, a second-year English major who held leadership roles at the Carlisle, Pa., college, was on a "Serve the World" trip sponsored by the United Methodist Church and overseen by Dickinson staff. Kirkland, along with other students and staff on the trip, had gone to swim at a beach overseen by lifeguards on Saturday afternoon after their work was done, school officials said.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
As he sat behind the desk in his antiseptic office in Voorhees, Jeffrey Kimelman recalled the not-so-sterile conditions in which he had worked a month before: "It was one of the nurses' jobs just to swat flies off the patient and the operating table. " Kimelman, an oral surgeon from Cherry Hill, spent 10 days last month operating on facially disfigured children in the village of Jutiapa, which is in the southeastern region of Guatemala, five miles from El Salvador. In the United States, he said, "most people hate to go to the dentist.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | BY STEPHEN F. GOLD
President Bush recently announced that the United States could not have normal relations with China until Beijing's authorities "recognize the validity" of a peoples' pro-democracy movement. At the same time, the President said that the "United States must stand, in whatever country, universally for human rights. " These policies recognize the United States' commitment to countries abiding by a rule of law and the basic tenets of the United Nations' Declaration of Human Rights.
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TRAVEL
March 20, 2016
La Lancha is a boutique hotel near Guatemala's second-largest lake, Peten Itza, and a 90-minute drive from the Mayan ruins at Tikal. Rates: $149-$445. Cost includes free WiFi and a continental breakfast. Information: 800-746-3743, 011-502-7928-8331, thefamilycoppolaresorts.com.
NEWS
January 1, 2016
HAWAII Executive action on guns expected President Obama is expected to take executive action next week to expand background checks on gun sales, according to an individual whose gun-control advocacy group has been briefed by administration officials about the timing. The person was not authorized to discuss details before the announcement and spoke on condition of anonymity. White House officials would not confirm the timing. Spokesman Eric Schultz said the president would prefer that Congress act, but he knows that prospect is unlikely.
SPORTS
November 6, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Growing up in Monrovia, Liberia, Phedel Saye played soccer in the streets of his country's capital. His parents, Wilfred and Helena, encouraged him to play as often as he could, so much so that the forward joked that they "forced him" outside sometimes. When he was 12 years old, Saye and his family left Liberia. But before that, for seven years, he learned how to play the game in much different conditions than those of a grassy yard. After he moved to Philadelphia, he took his talents to Northeast.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT MIGHT not sound like much, but Christopher Jones was proud of having deciphered the Mayan words for "mother" and "father. " To nonexperts, hieroglyphs might look like a lot of childish doodling, but to archaeologists, like Christopher Jones, they tell stories, recount history and maybe make a grocery list. So, being able to transcribe a couple of words is considered a feat among those who dig in the dirt around ancient temples and monuments where people lived and thrived in the centuries before the birth of Christ.
REAL_ESTATE
May 31, 2015 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
Artsy. Edgy. Transitional. Distinctive tags describing Old City. But Ted Newbold, who owns a rowhouse here with wife Helen Cunningham, called the area home back when descriptions such as warehouse and fashionable weren't commingled. Newbold, 84, an urban pioneer, is a descendant of Nathan Trotter, founder of Nathan Trotter & Co. Inc., a metal-products company established on Front Street in 1789. In the 1950s, he worked for the firm and lived in Society Hill and on Elfreth's Alley.
NEWS
November 11, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THREE YEARS AGO, Brennan O'Donnell, now 17, wanted to see the world and make a difference. So O'Donnell, who lives in Flourtown but has family roots in the city's Chestnut Hill neighborhood, joined Teenagers Inc., an organization based there that allows teens to get involved with community service - both in the city's Northwest neighborhoods and abroad, with an annual 10-day service trip to Guatemala. O'Donnell, a senior at LaSalle High School, is now gearing up for his fourth service trip to Guatemala.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Curt Anderson, Associated Press
MIAMI - Antivirus software founder John McAfee arrived in the United States on Wednesday night after being deported from Guatemala, where he had sought to evade police questioning in the killing of a man in neighboring Belize. The American Airlines commercial jet carrying McAfee landed in Miami shortly before 7 p.m. Wednesday, said Miami International Airport spokesman Greg Chin. A short time later, a posting on McAfee's website announced that he was at a hotel in Miami's upscale South Beach neighborhood.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
Guatemala quake kills at least 48 SAN MARCOS, Guatemala - A 7.4-magnitude earthquake rocked Guatemala on Wednesday, killing at least 48 people as it toppled thick adobe walls, shook huge landslides down onto highways, and sent terrified villagers streaming into the streets of this idyllic mountain town near the border with Mexico. One hundred people were missing, and hundreds were injured. The quake, which hit at 10:35 a.m., caused terror over an unusually wide area, with damage reported in all but one of Guatemala's 22 states.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Romina Ruiz-Goiriena and Alberto Arce, Associated Press
ESCUINTLA, Guatemala - A long-simmering volcano exploded into a series of powerful eruptions outside one of Guatemala's most famous tourist areas Thursday, hurling thick clouds of ash nearly two miles high, spewing rivers of lava down its flanks, and prompting evacuation orders for more than 33,000 people from surrounding communities. Guatemala's head of emergency evacuations, Sergio Cabanas, said the evacuees were ordered to leave some 17 villages around the Volcan del Fuego, which sits about six miles southwest from the colonial city of Antigua, a popular tourist area and home to 45,000 people.
SPORTS
September 13, 2012 | Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio - The United States rebounded from a loss at Jamaica in World Cup qualifying, beating the Reggae Boyz, 1-0, Tuesday night as Herculez Gomez curled a free kick in the 55th minute. The U.S. scored after Clint Dempsey was fouled by Rodolph Austin. The U.S. is tied with Guatemala (2-1-1) at seven points in Group A of the North and Central American and Caribbean semifinals. Jamaica (2-1-1) also has seven points but trails on goal difference.
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