CollectionsGuest Worker Program
IN THE NEWS

Guest Worker Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 19, 2005 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Bush administration urged Congress yesterday to enact a three-point immigration plan that includes tougher border security, aggressive interior enforcement, and an immigrant guest-worker program much like the one the President proposed early last year. Under the updated guest-worker program, immigrants living in the United States illegally could step "out of the shadows" to work in this country for up to six years before being required to return to their home countries. They would first have to pay "substantial" fines and would not be put on paths toward permanent residency or U.S. citizenship.
NEWS
April 25, 2006 | By Ron Hutcheson and Dana Hull INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
President Bush delivered a forceful rebuttal yesterday to immigration hard-liners, telling a Southern California audience that illegal immigrants were here to stay. "Massive deportation of the people here is unrealistic," he told the Orange County Business Council, as anti-immigration demonstrators chanted outside. "You can hear people out there hollering it's going to work. It's not going to work. " Bush came to Orange County, a flash point for tensions in the national debate on the issue, as Congress geared up for another effort to overhaul immigration laws.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Alex Nowrasteh
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and AFL-CIO reached a tentative agreement to support increasing lawful migration through a guest-worker program for lower-skilled migrants. The details are obscure, but this agreement is an essential first step for successful immigration reform - a step so far ignored by the Obama administration. Without a guest-worker program, quite simply, immigration reform will fail. Overwhelmingly, immigrants come to the United States because they want jobs, and American businesses have jobs to give.
NEWS
May 17, 2006 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Senate gave a bipartisan show of support yesterday for the kind of comprehensive approach to immigration law that President Bush endorsed Monday night, rejecting attempts to limit the legislation to border enforcement only and to kill a proposed guest-worker program. The Senate voted overwhelmingly - 69-28 - to preserve the proposed guest-worker program. It would bring up to 325,000 more low-skilled foreign workers into the country each year. The Senate also voted 55-40 to reject an amendment sponsored by Sen. Johnny Isakson (R., Ga.)
NEWS
April 26, 2006 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Facing pressure from constituents, Senate leaders emerged from a meeting with President Bush yesterday to say that chances were good that the Senate will pass a compromise immigration bill in the coming weeks. Republican and Democratic Senate leaders - who engaged in finger-pointing after a previous compromise collapsed April 8, said that the meeting was productive and that there appeared to be ample ground to move forward. "I think we made good progress today," said Sen. Harry Reid (D., Nev.)
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By David Nakamura, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Labor and business leaders announced Thursday that they have agreed in principle to terms that would establish a new guest-worker program for foreigners, but they cautioned that details of the program are still being negotiated. In a joint statement, AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka and U.S. Chamber of Commerce president Thomas Donohue expressed optimism over talks on how to make it easier for companies to hire foreign nationals when Americans are not available. "We have found common ground in several important areas and have committed to continue to work together," the two leaders said.
NEWS
January 12, 2007 | By Nancy Petersen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Agriculture is Pennsylvania's number-one industry and it is headed for trouble unless Congress moves quickly to enact a practical guest worker program for the nation's farmers. That was the consensus of a panel of experts at the Pennsylvania Farm Show yesterday. Failure to act could mean crops rotting in fields and orchards, higher prices for food, and a multimillion-dollar hit to the state's economy, they said. "Immigration is the source of labor for all of our harvesting," said Sam Kieffer, a lobbyist for the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Erica Werner and Julie Pace, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Unlikely allies, business and labor leaders joined in support of the White House's immigration overhaul efforts Tuesday while also launching high-stakes negotiations to overcome an issue that has split them before - creating a guest-worker program to ensure that future immigrants come to the United States legally. The broad agreement on a need for immigration changes and a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million illegal immigrants already here is driven largely by self-interest.
NEWS
May 25, 2006 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
With a decisive Senate vote yesterday to limit debate, the stage is set for a vote today on comprehensive immigration legislation. Few bills have stirred as much passion as the effort to deal with border security, more than 11 million illegal immigrants, and a proposed guest-worker program. Through amendments, the Senate bill crafted mainly by Republican John McCain of Arizona and Democrat Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts has taken a more conservative bent. Senators have voted for triple-layer fencing along 370 miles of the 2,000-mile border with Mexico and to cap the number of people eligible for new guest-worker programs at 200,000 a year.
NEWS
April 1, 2006 | By William Douglas INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush and the leaders of Mexico and Canada concluded a two-day summit at this vacation resort yesterday without making visible progress on immigration or the economic issues that have strained relations among the three countries. At a news conference, Bush and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper politely disagreed over an immigration issue that has gotten little attention: a U.S. law that will go into effect in January 2008 requiring people entering the United States through Mexico and Canada to carry passports or similar secure documents.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 31, 2013
WITH the government shutdown finally concluded, the threat of a strike on Syria on the back burner and no serious chance that the U.S. will default on its debts for at least the next three months, perhaps Congress can pull itself together and get back to work on stalled legislation. It should begin by tackling comprehensive immigration reform. After all, much of the heavy lifting on this complicated and controversial issue has been done. Earlier this year, the Senate passed a sweeping bipartisan bill that calls for allowing more high-skilled and low-skilled workers into the U.S. while also establishing a new guest-worker program that includes additional protections for farm workers.
NEWS
March 6, 2013 | By Alex Nowrasteh
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and AFL-CIO reached a tentative agreement to support increasing lawful migration through a guest-worker program for lower-skilled migrants. The details are obscure, but this agreement is an essential first step for successful immigration reform - a step so far ignored by the Obama administration. Without a guest-worker program, quite simply, immigration reform will fail. Overwhelmingly, immigrants come to the United States because they want jobs, and American businesses have jobs to give.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By David Nakamura, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Labor and business leaders announced Thursday that they have agreed in principle to terms that would establish a new guest-worker program for foreigners, but they cautioned that details of the program are still being negotiated. In a joint statement, AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka and U.S. Chamber of Commerce president Thomas Donohue expressed optimism over talks on how to make it easier for companies to hire foreign nationals when Americans are not available. "We have found common ground in several important areas and have committed to continue to work together," the two leaders said.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Erica Werner and Julie Pace, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Unlikely allies, business and labor leaders joined in support of the White House's immigration overhaul efforts Tuesday while also launching high-stakes negotiations to overcome an issue that has split them before - creating a guest-worker program to ensure that future immigrants come to the United States legally. The broad agreement on a need for immigration changes and a pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11 million illegal immigrants already here is driven largely by self-interest.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
By Ken Herman DALLAS - Five years after his own party killed his immigration reform plan - and a month after a crushing election defeat that has some in that party rethinking the issue - former President George W. Bush delicately but definitely reentered the fray. He's hoping it goes better this time. So should everyone who realizes the status quo on immigration is not viable. There seems to be growing consensus on that, but the jury's out on exactly what should be done. That's why the George W. Bush Institute convened this week's conference on immigration and economic growth.
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Moving decisively, the U.S. State Department has banned a nonprofit group that supplied 400 foreign students as laborers to a Hershey Co. candy-packaging plant last year from participating in a popular cultural-exchange program for two years. The California-based organization, CETUSA, brought the foreign students to the United States on J-1 visas. Once here, the students were to have practiced English and learned about America while also earning money in summer jobs. The students, many from Ukraine and Turkey, protested in August on Chocolate Avenue in Hershey saying they were forced to work long hours for low pay in the Palmyra packaging plant, and had little time or funds to travel and interact with Americans.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
One week ago today, I arose before dawn and went to buy coffee and a newspaper at a southwest Florida 7-Eleven. I was the lone white guy in a convenience store jammed with Latinos wearing T-shirts emblazoned with the names of lawn services whose trucks packed the parking lot. This was Black Friday, but none of these guys was going shopping. They were soon to manicure the lawns of one of the most prosperous, politically conservative communities in a swing state. The local paper brought news of a campaign appearance by Newt Gingrich, the GOP presidential front-runner, just three days after a debate in which he'd proposed a "humane" approach to illegal immigration.
NEWS
November 7, 2011
"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. " - Matthew 9:37 Good news: The jobs crisis is over. You read that correctly. There is plenty work available for downsized, furloughed, and involuntarily separated laborers whose inability to land jobs in a rugged economy has driven the unemployment rate past 9 percent. You probably didn't hear about it in the "lamestream" media, but the problem has indeed been solved - and it didn't take some fancy-pants economic stimulus package to get 'er done, either.
NEWS
September 19, 2008 | CHRISTINE M. FLOWERS
HE'S AT it again. First, Barack Obama insulted rural Pennsylvanians, among others, by calling them bitter, clinging to their guns and religion. He said it at a private fund-raiser in San Francisco wine and cheese country, where the sky is as blue as the voters, and apparently thought the rubes would remain blissfully ignorant of his disdain. But the guy is big on bilingualism. And now he's trying the same thing again - this time in Spanish. The Obama campaign has just come out with new TV and radio ads trying to link John McCain with racism.
NEWS
April 10, 2007 | Daily News wire services
Bush pushes guest-worker plan; Congress gets high marks, but . . . YUMA, Ariz. - President Bush visited the U.S.-Mexico border yesterday to tout a guest worker program for immigrants, pursuing a key domestic policy goal despite chilly relations with Congress. The trip, a bookend to the visit Bush made to the same southwestern desert city last May, comes as tension rises over an immigration proposal tied to the White House. Bush's team is privately trying to rally votes for what Bush calls comprehensive reform - a mix of get-tough security with promises of fair treatment for undocumented residents.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|