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Guidelines

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NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Marlene A. Prost, Special to The Inquirer
After a year of preparation, formal guidelines for accommodating students or employees with AIDS or AIDS-related infections have gone to the Marple Newton school board for its approval. A two-page document was received with little comment from the board at its public executive session Tuesday night. A vote is scheduled at a public board meeting Sept. 25. "We tried to make it very general and nonspecific. Each individual has to be dealt with on an individual basis," said Robert Plotkin, the district's physician, who assisted in developing the guidelines.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
The Haverford Township school board, in an attempt to "neither advance nor inhibit religion," has drafted guidelines to aid its teachers and administrators on religious issues, including Christmastime activities. A key proposed guideline presented at a work session of the school board on Tuesday night states, "Any dramatic or musical displays and activities in art, music, dance or other form of artistic expression, regardless of the season, must be determined by their educational function and value and must avoid the atmosphere of a religious ceremony or observance.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township school board Tuesday was presented with a detailed report proposing that class sizes in the high school be pegged within a flexible range of 10 to 27 students. The 38-page final report was submitted by Superintendent John A. DeFlaminis after nearly 18 months of discussions, research and public hearings with the administrative staff, teachers and parents. The report, DeFlaminis emphasized, is a guideline subject to periodic review of conditions that would influence class sizes, such as complexity of courses, extent of student needs, instructional needs, scheduling and enrollment.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Four former Synthes Inc. executives who pleaded guilty to charges stemming from an illegal clinical trial of bone cement in which three people died are now awaiting word from U.S. District Judge Legrome D. Davis about the guidelines he will use to sentence them and the date for sentencing. The defendants are Michael Huggins of West Chester, Thomas Higgins of Berwyn, Richard Bohner of Malvern, and John Walsh of Coatesville. The four men were in court earlier this week as their lawyers argued for guidelines that might lessen the potential prison and probation time.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A week after rescinding an ordinance permitting planned residential developments, the Uwchlan Board of Supervisors has formed a six-member committee to prepare new guidelines for large residential developments. Supervisor Chairwoman Mary Powell said at Tuesday's joint meeting of the supervisors and Planning Commission that the committee would try to complete a replacement ordinance by the end of the year. She said the committee would consider density, parking, open space, screening and traffic in proposing new guidelines.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the opinion of some Haverford School District parents, Scrooge - not Santa - is dominating their children's holidays this year. Parents Thursday night complained that the way the new religious guidelines have been implemented in the schools, the holidays are being ignored. "It is a tomb for this time of year," Frank Werner told the board. "Tell me why Ronald Reagan can light a tree at the White House and my child can't have decorations?" Last month, the board adopted a set of religious guidelines designed to show sensitivity toward all students and their beliefs.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Caroline Crosson, Special to The Inquirer
Members of the Octorara Area school board have reviewed proposed guidelines for the busing of students to their baby sitters' homes after school each day. The district transports students without extra cost to their babysitters' homes, instead of the students' homes, as a service to working parents and others who are not home after school hours. The board members reviewed the new guidelines at a work session Monday night.. The guidelines are expected to be on the board's agenda at its meeting tomorrow.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
The Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections has issued guidelines to comply with legislation passed by the General Assembly extending deadlines for commercial and residential construction permits and approvals until July 1, 2016. The Assembly approved an amendment to an act passed in 2010 extending for three more years all permits and approvals of building projects received between Jan. 1, 2009, and July 1, 2013. The amendment was passed in part to provide additional time for projects throughout Pennsylvania affected by the economic downturn.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | By James J. Kilpatrick
One trouble with federal judges is that they spend most of their lives in a warm milk bath of adulation. Accountable to no one, protected by life tenure, they take on the trappings of hereditary monarchs. We are seeing the phenomenon all over the country in the judges' revolt against federal guidelines for sentencing criminals. The guidelines are tough. Some of the protesting judges are woefully soft. Consider the U.S. district judge. His public day begins when the bailiff cries "All rise!"
LIVING
August 7, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One document comes up frequently whenever doctors and insurers debate how soon new mothers and their babies should be sent home from the hospital: the guidelines for perinatal care written jointly by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. U.S. Rep. Bernie Sanders (Ind., Vt.) uses the policy paper to justify his House resolution requiring hospitals and insurance companies to allow new mothers and their babies to stay in the hospital for two days.
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NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A glitch in the Obamacare window-shopping tool that incorrectly responded "not eligible" to queries about financial help from households just above the poverty line was fixed hours after the administration learned of the issue, officials said Friday. For 35 days, Healthcare.gov used the wrong year's federal poverty-level guidelines for informal assessments of eligibility. And, while that website has been the only one empowered to make final decisions in most states, similar mistakes uncovered at independent sites raise the possibility that wrong information is still being disseminated less than 10 days before open enrollment ends for the year.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the hospice nurse called police in the assisted-suicide case of Barbara Mancini, David Casarett knew he had work to do. He feared that the actions of one hospice nurse could discourage Americans from using that model of palliative care for the terminally ill, or inhibit dying people in pain from taking morphine. So Casarett, a University of Pennsylvania physician and chief medical officer of Penn-Wissahickon Hospice, teamed with law professor Thaddeus Pope, formerly of Widener University and an expert in end-of-life law, to develop ethical guidelines for hospice workers nationwide on when to report suspicions of assisted suicide.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Philadelphia developer Nolen Properties has plowed millions of dollars into restoring two historic but long-neglected properties in Mount Airy. Today the firm is almost done converting one, the historic Nugent Home, built for retired Baptist ministers, into affordable housing for senior citizens - a project budgeted at $17 million. The company had hoped to take advantage of a new state historic preservation tax credit to get a small measure of financial relief, maybe as much as $500,000.
NEWS
December 2, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON One woman testified that her husband, dying of brain cancer, couldn't persuade a court to let him stop paying alimony to an ex-wife who had a job. Another said her husband went to jail because he was out of work and couldn't afford to pay his alimony. Alimony payers and spouses, claiming an unfair system had forced them into financial distress - and given former spouses incentive not to support themselves - told story after story last week before a panel of Assembly lawmakers at the Statehouse.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Medical guidelines are meant to unify doctors and standardize care for patients around treatments supported by the best available science. But the latest guidelines on the use of statins, a class of drugs used to reduce cholesterol, are already generating significant pushback from doctors. The controversy is likely to confuse patients. The new rules released this week by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology would expand the number of people getting statins to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, or stroke while eliminating specific numeric goals for LDL, or bad cholesterol.
NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Zachary A. Goldfarb and Kimberly Kindy, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - In early 2010, an Internal Revenue Service team in Cincinnati began noticing a stream of applications from groups with political-sounding names, setting in motion a dragnet aimed at separating legitimate tax-exempt groups from those working to get candidates elected. The IRS officials decided to single out one type of political group for particular scrutiny. "These cases involve various local organizations in the tea party movement," read one internal IRS e-mail sent at the time.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Ashley Halsey III, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The federal government wants automakers to put limits on the electronic devices they install in new cars and is recommending that most Internet-linked applications and video equipment be disabled unless a vehicle is standing still. "These guidelines recognize that today's drivers appreciate technology, while providing automakers with a way to balance the innovation consumers want with the safety we all need," said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. "Combined with good laws, good enforcement, and good education, these guidelines can save lives.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Rebecca Boone, Associated Press
BOISE, Idaho - Idaho has become the first state to have its so-called fetal-pain law banning abortions after 20 weeks struck down by the federal courts. The decision from U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill was handed down Wednesday as part of a ruling that also overturns other abortion restrictions in Idaho. Also on Wednesday, Arkansas adopted a law banning abortion at 12 weeks of pregnancy, around the time that a fetal heartbeat can be detected by abdominal ultrasound. The Idaho ruling is binding not only in that state but could have a persuasive effect in lawsuits challenging similar bans in other states - such as Arizona, where a suit is pending before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than other witnesses, it was the mother-in-law's impassioned testimony that sealed the verdict. There were reams of testimony from experts on the technical causes of the downed utility wire that killed Carrie Goretzka, a young mother of two girls, on June 2, 2009, at her home in Irwin, Pa., 30 miles east of Pittsburgh. But it was the account of JoAnn Goretzka, who spoke of seeing her daughter-in-law engulfed in smoke and flames the day the line came down, that had the most power.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
JUVENILE-JUSTICE reformers rejoiced last summer when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down mandatory life-without-parole sentences for juveniles, calling them cruel-and-unusual punishment. Despairing anti-crime crusaders worried that the decision might mean that juveniles, quite literally, would then get away with murder. But Wednesday, a Philadelphia judge put those worries to rest. Common Pleas Judge Linda A. Carpenter ordered Radames Sanabria, of Philadelphia, who was 17 when he was charged in a 2010 slaying, to serve life in prison without parole.
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