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Guidelines

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May 14, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Association of Racing Commissioners International has developed guidelines regarding racing crop construction and use. The crop is to be used only for safety, correction, and encouragement, and in a manner consistent with the jockey's best efforts to win. The jockey is to show the horse the crop and give it time to respond before striking the horse. After using the crop, the jockey is to give the horse time to respond before using it again. The crop is to be applied only to the horse's shoulder or hindquarters, not its face or flanks.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Marlene A. Prost, Special to The Inquirer
After a year of preparation, formal guidelines for accommodating students or employees with AIDS or AIDS-related infections have gone to the Marple Newton school board for its approval. A two-page document was received with little comment from the board at its public executive session Tuesday night. A vote is scheduled at a public board meeting Sept. 25. "We tried to make it very general and nonspecific. Each individual has to be dealt with on an individual basis," said Robert Plotkin, the district's physician, who assisted in developing the guidelines.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
The Haverford Township school board, in an attempt to "neither advance nor inhibit religion," has drafted guidelines to aid its teachers and administrators on religious issues, including Christmastime activities. A key proposed guideline presented at a work session of the school board on Tuesday night states, "Any dramatic or musical displays and activities in art, music, dance or other form of artistic expression, regardless of the season, must be determined by their educational function and value and must avoid the atmosphere of a religious ceremony or observance.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township school board Tuesday was presented with a detailed report proposing that class sizes in the high school be pegged within a flexible range of 10 to 27 students. The 38-page final report was submitted by Superintendent John A. DeFlaminis after nearly 18 months of discussions, research and public hearings with the administrative staff, teachers and parents. The report, DeFlaminis emphasized, is a guideline subject to periodic review of conditions that would influence class sizes, such as complexity of courses, extent of student needs, instructional needs, scheduling and enrollment.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Four former Synthes Inc. executives who pleaded guilty to charges stemming from an illegal clinical trial of bone cement in which three people died are now awaiting word from U.S. District Judge Legrome D. Davis about the guidelines he will use to sentence them and the date for sentencing. The defendants are Michael Huggins of West Chester, Thomas Higgins of Berwyn, Richard Bohner of Malvern, and John Walsh of Coatesville. The four men were in court earlier this week as their lawyers argued for guidelines that might lessen the potential prison and probation time.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A week after rescinding an ordinance permitting planned residential developments, the Uwchlan Board of Supervisors has formed a six-member committee to prepare new guidelines for large residential developments. Supervisor Chairwoman Mary Powell said at Tuesday's joint meeting of the supervisors and Planning Commission that the committee would try to complete a replacement ordinance by the end of the year. She said the committee would consider density, parking, open space, screening and traffic in proposing new guidelines.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the opinion of some Haverford School District parents, Scrooge - not Santa - is dominating their children's holidays this year. Parents Thursday night complained that the way the new religious guidelines have been implemented in the schools, the holidays are being ignored. "It is a tomb for this time of year," Frank Werner told the board. "Tell me why Ronald Reagan can light a tree at the White House and my child can't have decorations?" Last month, the board adopted a set of religious guidelines designed to show sensitivity toward all students and their beliefs.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Though he had no record, and was 15 years old, he was charged in adult court. Bail was set at $75,000. The required 10 percent of that, $7,500, was more than the teen or his mother could fathom. So, in January 2015, Eugene Lee was sent to an adult jail, Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center. It was three months before his mother, Wylicia Clark, 35, of the city's Frankford section, could get the bail reduced to an amount she could pay. The charges involved an attempted robbery with a BB gun, in which no one was shot and Eugene was not the gunman.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Caroline Crosson, Special to The Inquirer
Members of the Octorara Area school board have reviewed proposed guidelines for the busing of students to their baby sitters' homes after school each day. The district transports students without extra cost to their babysitters' homes, instead of the students' homes, as a service to working parents and others who are not home after school hours. The board members reviewed the new guidelines at a work session Monday night.. The guidelines are expected to be on the board's agenda at its meeting tomorrow.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
The Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections has issued guidelines to comply with legislation passed by the General Assembly extending deadlines for commercial and residential construction permits and approvals until July 1, 2016. The Assembly approved an amendment to an act passed in 2010 extending for three more years all permits and approvals of building projects received between Jan. 1, 2009, and July 1, 2013. The amendment was passed in part to provide additional time for projects throughout Pennsylvania affected by the economic downturn.
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NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Though he had no record, and was 15 years old, he was charged in adult court. Bail was set at $75,000. The required 10 percent of that, $7,500, was more than the teen or his mother could fathom. So, in January 2015, Eugene Lee was sent to an adult jail, Philadelphia Industrial Correctional Center. It was three months before his mother, Wylicia Clark, 35, of the city's Frankford section, could get the bail reduced to an amount she could pay. The charges involved an attempted robbery with a BB gun, in which no one was shot and Eugene was not the gunman.
NEWS
July 6, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Parents, we've all been there in the dark of night. Staggering half-asleep into the wailing baby's bedroom and quickly administering a bottle or breast so everyone can collapse back into bed. Don't do it, say Pennsylvania State University researchers. If you can resist the habit of making feeding your first response, your baby likely will sleep better and may weigh less as a result. This recommendation is one of a list of good-parenting guidelines that the Penn State team distributed to more than 130 families in the Harrisburg area.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
The Obama administration is pressuring the food industry to make foods less salty, proposing long-awaited sodium guidelines in an effort to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke. The guidelines released Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration are voluntary, so food companies won't be required to comply, and it could be a year or more before they are final. But the idea is to persuade companies and restaurants - many of which have already lowered sodium in their products - to take a more consistent approach.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Some of those who claimed to have seen the shooter described him as being heavier and taller than James Dennis, the man who was convicted. While legal battles raged, Dennis spent more than 20 years on death row. Then, in 2013, a federal judge overturned his conviction in the 1991 slaying of a high school student for her earrings at a Philadelphia subway station. In issuing the ruling, Judge Anita B. Brody described the eyewitness identifications of Dennis as "shaky. " Historically, false identifications have been a bane of criminal investigations.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie's administration announced measures Friday to ease some New Jersey state gun restrictions, including an expansion of the standard for getting a permit to carry a gun. The Republican governor, who previously endorsed loosening the state's gun laws, said in a statement Friday that the changes would "deliver relief and assurance to New Jerseyans exercising their Second Amendment rights. " The changes, which follow recommendations issued by a study commission Christie formed last year, include a regulatory amendment that adds "serious threats" to the circumstances considered a special danger to a person's life.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Here is a recently updated version of the guidelines for prescribing addictive pain medicine (opioids) at Temple University Hospital's emergency department. Objective: To appropriately relieve pain for patients and attempt to identify those who may be abusing or addicted to opioids and refer them for special assistance. Guidelines for treating non-cancer pain 1. Opioid analgesics may be appropriate for acute illness or injury when less addictive therapies such as NSAIDs (nonsteroanti-inflammatoryatory drugs)
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Emergency rooms are increasingly a prime spot for patients seeking powerful pain medications, with doctors caught between the desire to help people in pain and the need to discourage addiction and even overdoses. Temple University Hospital reported Tuesday that it had found a straightforward way to limit prescriptions of these opioid drugs, such as Percocet, Dilaudid, and Vicodin: a set of guidelines that helps ER doctors determine when to say no. Among patients with dental, neck, back, or unspecified chronic pain for which opioids are not advised, the number getting prescriptions dropped below 30 percent immediately after the guidance was distributed in January 2013 - down from 52.7 percent beforehand.
NEWS
October 26, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city's Department of Licenses and Inspections failed to follow new inspection guidelines in more than 80 percent of private demolitions performed over the last nine months, an analysis of agency records shows. And, people familiar with L&I records say, the agency's database appears to have been altered to show that demolition inspections had occurred when they had not. In at least one case, records show, the agency's database said five inspections that should have occurred during a demolition were actually conducted four months after the building had been razed.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Anita Kulick, For The Inquirer
Is your child ready for a cellphone? There's no way around it. Sooner or later, most parents will confront the issue of whether to let their children have cellphones, and if so, when? The good news is there's lots of expert advice available. The not-so-good news is none of it provides the answer. That's because no one answer is right for all parents and all kids. On this question you're on your own - and, unlike the age for legally driving and buying alcohol, there aren't any laws to back you up. One thing is sure: It shouldn't be based on the number of times your daughter tells you, "All of my friends have one. " Or, for that matter, how many of your friends have given their kids' phones.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adding to debate and doubt over the value of breast cancer screening, the American Cancer Society on Tuesday affirmed that mammograms save lives - but for the first time suggested women should start the X-rays later in life. Until now, the venerable cancer organization's guidance has been simple: Yearly mammograms, starting at age 40, for as long as a woman is in good health. The update says women at average breast cancer risk should have annual mammograms from age 45 to 54, then "transition" to every other year, but "have the opportunity to continue annually.
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