CollectionsGuidelines
IN THE NEWS

Guidelines

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By Marlene A. Prost, Special to The Inquirer
After a year of preparation, formal guidelines for accommodating students or employees with AIDS or AIDS-related infections have gone to the Marple Newton school board for its approval. A two-page document was received with little comment from the board at its public executive session Tuesday night. A vote is scheduled at a public board meeting Sept. 25. "We tried to make it very general and nonspecific. Each individual has to be dealt with on an individual basis," said Robert Plotkin, the district's physician, who assisted in developing the guidelines.
NEWS
October 22, 1987 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
The Haverford Township school board, in an attempt to "neither advance nor inhibit religion," has drafted guidelines to aid its teachers and administrators on religious issues, including Christmastime activities. A key proposed guideline presented at a work session of the school board on Tuesday night states, "Any dramatic or musical displays and activities in art, music, dance or other form of artistic expression, regardless of the season, must be determined by their educational function and value and must avoid the atmosphere of a religious ceremony or observance.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Radnor Township school board Tuesday was presented with a detailed report proposing that class sizes in the high school be pegged within a flexible range of 10 to 27 students. The 38-page final report was submitted by Superintendent John A. DeFlaminis after nearly 18 months of discussions, research and public hearings with the administrative staff, teachers and parents. The report, DeFlaminis emphasized, is a guideline subject to periodic review of conditions that would influence class sizes, such as complexity of courses, extent of student needs, instructional needs, scheduling and enrollment.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Four former Synthes Inc. executives who pleaded guilty to charges stemming from an illegal clinical trial of bone cement in which three people died are now awaiting word from U.S. District Judge Legrome D. Davis about the guidelines he will use to sentence them and the date for sentencing. The defendants are Michael Huggins of West Chester, Thomas Higgins of Berwyn, Richard Bohner of Malvern, and John Walsh of Coatesville. The four men were in court earlier this week as their lawyers argued for guidelines that might lessen the potential prison and probation time.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A week after rescinding an ordinance permitting planned residential developments, the Uwchlan Board of Supervisors has formed a six-member committee to prepare new guidelines for large residential developments. Supervisor Chairwoman Mary Powell said at Tuesday's joint meeting of the supervisors and Planning Commission that the committee would try to complete a replacement ordinance by the end of the year. She said the committee would consider density, parking, open space, screening and traffic in proposing new guidelines.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the opinion of some Haverford School District parents, Scrooge - not Santa - is dominating their children's holidays this year. Parents Thursday night complained that the way the new religious guidelines have been implemented in the schools, the holidays are being ignored. "It is a tomb for this time of year," Frank Werner told the board. "Tell me why Ronald Reagan can light a tree at the White House and my child can't have decorations?" Last month, the board adopted a set of religious guidelines designed to show sensitivity toward all students and their beliefs.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | By Caroline Crosson, Special to The Inquirer
Members of the Octorara Area school board have reviewed proposed guidelines for the busing of students to their baby sitters' homes after school each day. The district transports students without extra cost to their babysitters' homes, instead of the students' homes, as a service to working parents and others who are not home after school hours. The board members reviewed the new guidelines at a work session Monday night.. The guidelines are expected to be on the board's agenda at its meeting tomorrow.
NEWS
August 3, 2012
The Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections has issued guidelines to comply with legislation passed by the General Assembly extending deadlines for commercial and residential construction permits and approvals until July 1, 2016. The Assembly approved an amendment to an act passed in 2010 extending for three more years all permits and approvals of building projects received between Jan. 1, 2009, and July 1, 2013. The amendment was passed in part to provide additional time for projects throughout Pennsylvania affected by the economic downturn.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | By James J. Kilpatrick
One trouble with federal judges is that they spend most of their lives in a warm milk bath of adulation. Accountable to no one, protected by life tenure, they take on the trappings of hereditary monarchs. We are seeing the phenomenon all over the country in the judges' revolt against federal guidelines for sentencing criminals. The guidelines are tough. Some of the protesting judges are woefully soft. Consider the U.S. district judge. His public day begins when the bailiff cries "All rise!"
LIVING
August 7, 1995 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One document comes up frequently whenever doctors and insurers debate how soon new mothers and their babies should be sent home from the hospital: the guidelines for perinatal care written jointly by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. U.S. Rep. Bernie Sanders (Ind., Vt.) uses the policy paper to justify his House resolution requiring hospitals and insurance companies to allow new mothers and their babies to stay in the hospital for two days.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2015
IT MIGHT BE tempting to consider Charles Ramsey's role as co-chairman of a presidential task force on policing ironic, given that the police force over which he presides has its own long and checkered past of problems. Those problems range from individual causes - badly (and criminally) behaving police officers - to larger and lingering questions about policies and procedures in the department, especially around training and use of force. But we think that Ramsey is the natural authority for leading this large-scale look at policing across the country.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
NEW DIET guidelines: a death knell for meat eating? Headlines for February's long-awaited Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee recommendations practically shouted as much. And the meat industry seemed to agree: Barry Carpenter, president and CEO of the North American Meat Institute, quickly slammed the committee for a "flawed" report "generalizing about an entire category of foods," although that's exactly what the guidelines have done since back in the "Four Food Groups" days. At issue is a shift in the overall favorability of flesh-based foods in the diet: When the guidelines were last revised, in 2010, they said that healthy eating "emphasizes . . . lean meats and poultry," while the new recommendations say a healthy diet is "lower in red and processed meat.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AS FIRE Department leadership decides the fate of a paramedic who caused an uproar with a controversial Instagram post, one question still burns. What are department members like Marcel Salters, a paramedic at Medic 23 in West Philly, allowed to post on social media? The rules seem pretty standard for professionals, at least according to the Fire Department's social media and networking guidelines, obtained by the Daily News . Employees can't post "messages, images, comments or cartoons" that are threatening or sexually explicit, or hurl epithets or slurs against race, religion, gender and sexual orientation, according to the guidelines.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Gov. Christie fended off criticism for quarantining a nurse just back from aiding Ebola patients in West Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released more specific guidelines on how states can monitor returning individuals. The CDC offered specific risks and response suggestions for travelers without symptoms but did not go as far as to recommend quarantines, such as those imposed Friday by Christie and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, which have been called overly cautious.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission should improve its contracting procedures and business practices, an advisory panel said Tuesday. The three-member panel was created last year by the Turnpike Commission to review its practices after a grand jury investigation of the agency resulted in criminal charges against eight people. Three former top officials of the turnpike await trial on charges related to alleged bid-rigging and influence-peddling. Two turnpike employees pleaded guilty to charges of theft and unauthorized use of a state vehicle, and were sentenced to probation.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
State and medical organization officials released new guidelines Thursday for prescribing opioids, one of the first concrete steps that Pennsylvania has taken to address an overdose death rate that ranks among the worst in the nation. After months of discussion, collaboration, and compromise, a large task force requested by Gov. Corbett last fall announced the recommendations to help doctors responsibly prescribe narcotic painkillers. "The guidelines have a twofold mission," said Physician General Carrie DeLone, a task force cochair.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey lawmakers are racing to draft a constitutional amendment that would eliminate the right to bail for certain defendants as part of a broader effort to improve the state's criminal justice system. The Senate must take an important first step by Monday if the amendment is to be on the November ballot. At the same time, lawmakers are considering legislation that would allow some defendants to be released before trial without bail, in a move away from a monetary-based system to a risk-based one. Also under discussion is whether to establish speedy-trial deadlines, either in the amendment or in the bill.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saying stricter federal nutrition guidelines are too much to swallow, the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District has decided to remove its 1,300 high school students from the program that is to go into effect next school year. In deciding last week that the students would not join the 31 million across the country who get free or reduced-price lunches through the National School Lunch Program, the district said its own food policies were healthy enough for its high schoolers. The district's middle school and four elementary schools will still participate.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
United Airlines on Tuesday became the latest major carrier to change its frequent-flier program to reward miles for free travel based on the fare paid, rather than the distance flown. The change, announced by the nation's second-largest airline by passenger traffic, is modeled after a shift that competitor Delta Air Lines announced in February for its SkyMiles program, scheduled to take effect Jan. 1. Southwest Airlines, JetBlue, and Virgin America already have revenue-based rewards programs, which favor the passengers who spend the most, such as business travelers who buy expensive tickets and top spenders in first class and business class.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The judge who sentenced former District Judge Rita Arnold for hiding a citation against her son wanted to make an example of someone who abused judicial powers, Arnold's attorney argued in a Superior Court appeal filed this week. Judge John Braxton - who ordered Arnold to serve 16 to 32 months in state prison on two misdemeanors - ignored the Chester County woman's previously crime-free life, remorse, and ongoing treatment for cancer, her attorney said. Braxton, "focusing entirely on the fact that these crimes were committed in her capacity as a magisterial district judge [and for her son]
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|