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Guidelines

FOOD
August 26, 1992 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Five will get you 10 that fresh produce is a super buy at a number of farm markets in Pennsylvania. Make that "Pick 5, Get 10%. " What this means is, buy five different fruits or vegetables at participating farm markets and get a 10 percent discount. The statewide sale started Monday and continues through Sept. 5. It's sponsored by the Pennsylvania Vegetable Marketing and Research Program and the Pennsylvania Vegetable Growers Association. The first-ever statewide growers farm market sale is designed to call attention to the national 5-A-Day health guidelines, which the U.S. Surgeon General, National Cancer Institute and other groups are using to promote better health through a low-fat, high-fiber diet.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Trustees of Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education yesterday approved affirmative-action guidelines aimed at boosting minority enrollment, retention and hiring on the campuses of the 14 state-owned colleges and universities. The guidelines, which are to serve as a blueprint for individual campuses to draw up their affirmative-action plans, were unanimously approved by the 14 members of the 16-member board who met on the campus of West Chester University. Under the guidelines, each school is to meet certain numerical goals for the enrollment of minority students over the next five years, beginning in the 1988-89 academic year.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
The Paxon Hollow Long Range Planning Committee has drafted a set of guidelines that will be presented to golf course operators interested in bidding for the contract to operate Paxon Hollow Country Club, Marple Township's golf course. Although copies of the draft document were prepared for each commissioner, it was not made available to the public in fairness to potential bidders, committee members said. Member Daniel I. Donohue Jr. said the document set forth the broad parameters of what the committee was looking for but left room for suggestions from potential bidders.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The five elderly patients died terrible deaths in Delaware County nursing homes, prosecutors say. Three had bedsores, one fell into a diabetic coma, and one was fatally scalded. Yesterday, a two-year inquiry into their deaths produced something positive: a set of guidelines that prosecutors hope will become the model for care of diabetics in nursing homes across the nation. While admitting no wrongdoing, the three homes - Chester Care Center in Chester, Bishop Nursing Home in Media, and Manchester House Nursing & Convalescent Center in Media - agreed yesterday to pay a $500,000 penalty and to abide by the new guidelines for diabetes management and basic care.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - President Obama has signed executive orders that lay out how far military commanders around the globe can go in using cyber attacks and other computer operations against enemies and as part of routine espionage in other countries. The orders detail when the military must seek presidential approval for a cyber assault on an enemy and weave cyber capabilities into U.S. war-fighting strategy, defense officials and cyber security experts said. Signed more than a month ago, the orders cap a two-year Pentagon effort to draft U.S. rules for cyber warfare.
SPORTS
March 4, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Shaquille O'Neal is no longer around, but Mike Bibby and Shawn Marion will be able to suit up for the NBA's first replay since 1982. The league set guidelines for Saturday's do-over between the Atlanta Hawks and Miami Heat, who must complete the final 51.9 seconds of their Dec. 19 overtime game. The Hawks left the court that night with a 117-111 victory, but commissioner David Stern struck it from the books after the home team's stat crew mistakenly ruled that O'Neal, then playing for Miami, had fouled out with less than a minute to go in overtime.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fifteen years ago, Capreece Lackey, 42, had steady work that she never put on her resumé. In fact, it landed her in jail, when she was arrested for prostitution next to a rusty railroad bridge in North Philadelphia. "I had no soul," said Lackey, who was convicted on the prostitution charge, as well as a lesser charge of obstruction of traffic. "I didn't care what I did. I was addicted to crack cocaine. " Lackey has been sober since 1999, but because of her criminal record, she's still paying the price in unemployment and poverty.
NEWS
November 18, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsylvania parents' organization has persuaded 110 state legislators to join a campaign to recall sex-education guidelines that the group has called "filth" and "garbage. " Members of the Pennsylvania Parents Commission are now traveling across the state, holding meetings about the sex-education guidelines distributed by the state Department of Education in 1984. The commission is a nonprofit organization that claims about 5,000 members. Although the state does not require school districts to teach sex education, the Education Department distributed the "Health Curriculum Guide for Family Health" to each public school district three years ago. The document outlines suggested sex-education lessons for students in kindergarten through high school and lists recommended texts as supplements to classroom discussion.
NEWS
May 3, 2005 | By David Magnus and Arthur L. Caplan
One of the main complaints of critics of embryonic stem-cell research is that there are no guidelines, signposts or rules - just the promise of billions of dollars. That is no longer true. The widely respected National Academies has issued proposed guidelines for embryonic stem-cell research. While the report is only advisory, the group has now supplied a blueprint for the regulation of embryonic stem-cell research that should be the foundation for appropriate oversight and thus greater public confidence.
NEWS
September 5, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A pair of conflicts between residents and a borough review board have prompted officials to consider creating stronger guidelines for historic renovations. Borough Council members on Wednesday discussed hiring a consultant to help establish rules for residents making changes to homes in the borough's historic district. Council members said the guidelines would allow the borough's Historic Architectural Review Board to rely less on opinion - and more on objective standards - when it considers projects for approval.
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