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Guidelines

ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adding to debate and doubt over the value of breast cancer screening, the American Cancer Society on Tuesday affirmed that mammograms save lives - but for the first time suggested women should start the X-rays later in life. Until now, the venerable cancer organization's guidance has been simple: Yearly mammograms, starting at age 40, for as long as a woman is in good health. The update says women at average breast cancer risk should have annual mammograms from age 45 to 54, then "transition" to every other year, but "have the opportunity to continue annually.
REAL_ESTATE
September 6, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Recently, I wrote about a RealtyTrac report showing that the percentage of purchase price being committed to mortgage down payments has continued to drop as the real estate market has recovered over the last two years. The result of lower down payments is that more buyers are paying for private mortgage insurance, which protects the lender if the borrower defaults on the loan. The insurance covers the difference between what borrowers put down and 20 percent of the sale price or appraised value of the homes.
SPORTS
May 14, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Association of Racing Commissioners International has developed guidelines regarding racing crop construction and use. The crop is to be used only for safety, correction, and encouragement, and in a manner consistent with the jockey's best efforts to win. The jockey is to show the horse the crop and give it time to respond before striking the horse. After using the crop, the jockey is to give the horse time to respond before using it again. The crop is to be applied only to the horse's shoulder or hindquarters, not its face or flanks.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
IT MIGHT BE tempting to consider Charles Ramsey's role as co-chairman of a presidential task force on policing ironic, given that the police force over which he presides has its own long and checkered past of problems. Those problems range from individual causes - badly (and criminally) behaving police officers - to larger and lingering questions about policies and procedures in the department, especially around training and use of force. But we think that Ramsey is the natural authority for leading this large-scale look at policing across the country.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
NEW DIET guidelines: a death knell for meat eating? Headlines for February's long-awaited Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee recommendations practically shouted as much. And the meat industry seemed to agree: Barry Carpenter, president and CEO of the North American Meat Institute, quickly slammed the committee for a "flawed" report "generalizing about an entire category of foods," although that's exactly what the guidelines have done since back in the "Four Food Groups" days. At issue is a shift in the overall favorability of flesh-based foods in the diet: When the guidelines were last revised, in 2010, they said that healthy eating "emphasizes . . . lean meats and poultry," while the new recommendations say a healthy diet is "lower in red and processed meat.
NEWS
December 22, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AS FIRE Department leadership decides the fate of a paramedic who caused an uproar with a controversial Instagram post, one question still burns. What are department members like Marcel Salters, a paramedic at Medic 23 in West Philly, allowed to post on social media? The rules seem pretty standard for professionals, at least according to the Fire Department's social media and networking guidelines, obtained by the Daily News . Employees can't post "messages, images, comments or cartoons" that are threatening or sexually explicit, or hurl epithets or slurs against race, religion, gender and sexual orientation, according to the guidelines.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Gov. Christie fended off criticism for quarantining a nurse just back from aiding Ebola patients in West Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released more specific guidelines on how states can monitor returning individuals. The CDC offered specific risks and response suggestions for travelers without symptoms but did not go as far as to recommend quarantines, such as those imposed Friday by Christie and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, which have been called overly cautious.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission should improve its contracting procedures and business practices, an advisory panel said Tuesday. The three-member panel was created last year by the Turnpike Commission to review its practices after a grand jury investigation of the agency resulted in criminal charges against eight people. Three former top officials of the turnpike await trial on charges related to alleged bid-rigging and influence-peddling. Two turnpike employees pleaded guilty to charges of theft and unauthorized use of a state vehicle, and were sentenced to probation.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
State and medical organization officials released new guidelines Thursday for prescribing opioids, one of the first concrete steps that Pennsylvania has taken to address an overdose death rate that ranks among the worst in the nation. After months of discussion, collaboration, and compromise, a large task force requested by Gov. Corbett last fall announced the recommendations to help doctors responsibly prescribe narcotic painkillers. "The guidelines have a twofold mission," said Physician General Carrie DeLone, a task force cochair.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
New Jersey lawmakers are racing to draft a constitutional amendment that would eliminate the right to bail for certain defendants as part of a broader effort to improve the state's criminal justice system. The Senate must take an important first step by Monday if the amendment is to be on the November ballot. At the same time, lawmakers are considering legislation that would allow some defendants to be released before trial without bail, in a move away from a monetary-based system to a risk-based one. Also under discussion is whether to establish speedy-trial deadlines, either in the amendment or in the bill.
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