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NEWS
April 18, 1990 | By Patricia Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro residents may learn a bit about drug abuse when they pay their water and tax bills. Through a plan instituted by Joseph Manganaro, superintendent of the Water and Sewer Department, borough employees are distributing drug education guides when residents come in to pay their bills. The guides contain information about eight drugs, including alcohol, cocaine and marijuana, and list physical symptoms of users, what to look for and the dangers associated with the drug's use on a 3-by-5-inch slide-rule- like card.
NEWS
January 23, 1999 | MICHAEL S. WIRTZ / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Before a new show starts at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, much must be learned. Opening today will be "Jasper Johns: Process and Printmaking. " During training of museum guides, Caroline Cassells, a staff lecturer, talks about works called "Flags" and "Flags II. " The show has 125 proofs and prints.
NEWS
September 13, 2007
Comcast Corp. will donate $800,000 to the YMCA of Philadelphia & Vicinity for its Y Achievers Program, an official said yesterday. John Flynn, president and CEO of the Philadelphia YMCA, said the gift would allow the group to expand the Y Achievers to 500 students a year from 200 students and to hire staff. Y Achievers guides students in grades seven through 12 toward college and careers. - Inquirer staff
NEWS
April 10, 2016
Hello there Smart and science-minded, she's not so great at physics. Nicole is pretty, so when her eyes darted to his paper in 2007, Jason let her take a good look. Then a sophomore biology major at Denison University, Nicole soon realized junior biochemistry major Jason would make an ideal lab partner. "He sat in the front row and he asked so many questions," she said. Not only did Jason, who grew up in Fairlawn, Ohio, and Nicole, from Kent, work well together, they enjoyed each other's company.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty-four years ago this week, five young women chosen from a pool of nearly 300 went to work as municipal guides in City Hall and other historic Philadelphia buildings. No big deal today. But in 1965, interest was keen in the Civil Service positions, which paid $4,480 a year and required at least two years of college. Interest was keener in the women themselves. Newspapers as far away as Michigan, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Texas and California wrote breathlessly about their physical attributes and their charm and poise, and published photographs of them - all in a row outside the Municipal Services Building, like so many stewardesses.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The League of Women Voters Education Fund will convene a forum here next month to discuss the intent of the people who wrote the Constitution in the summer of 1787. The forum will be part of May 22-25 ceremonies being produced by We the People 200 Inc., the Constitution bicentennial agency here, to mark the May 25, 1787, opening of the convention that produced the founding federal document. The forum, like the 1787 convention itself, will not be open to the general public.
NEWS
October 3, 1988 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
It's possible that many of the tourists who stroll through Philadelphia's Washington Square and stop by the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Revolutionary War think that all the Revolutionary War soldiers said to be buried there were white. Unless, of course, those tourists are taking one of the American history tours led by Marion or Yovanne Douyon (pronounced Du-jung - it's a Haitian name), who would tell them that there were black soldiers in the American Revolutionary War and some of them are also buried in Washington Square.
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
'IT IS the most interesting neighborhood in the city," says Patricia Stringer. There are 100,000 residents in its 85 acres and not one complains about crime, city services, taxes, schools, or anything else. That's because they're all dead. They are interred in Laurel Hill Cemetery, the first graveyard to be designated a National Historical Landmark. Stringer, 62, is one of 30 volunteer tour guides. The cemetery in East Falls, established in 1836, is bounded by Ridge Avenue on the east, and overlooks Kelly Drive and the Schuylkill to the west.
TRAVEL
September 1, 2013 | By Debra Wolf Goldstein, For The Inquirer
When 19-year-old Jenna e-mailed me from college to suggest that she and I do an REI backpacking trip together, I was sure her father had put her up to it. But Jenna swore the idea was her own. "It's flattering you want to spend that much time with me," I told her happily. I looked forward to reconnecting with her after her school year and before she headed off to a semester abroad in the fall. Only three other people had signed up for this trip in the Blue Ridge Mountains. At the REI store in Fairfax, Va., on a steamy Thursday morning, the two REI trip guides made the introductions.
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