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Guinness

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FOOD
March 15, 2012 | By Elizabeth Karmel, Associated Press
Try this Guinness-marinated steak sandwich for St. Paddy's Day, a refreshing change from stew or corned beef and cabbage.   Guinness Marinated Flank Steak Sandwiches With Grilled Onions and Boursin Cheese Makes 4 servings 2-pound flank steak or London broil, at least 1-inch thick 14.9-ounce can Guinness beer 2 large red onions, cut into 1/2-inch slices 1 small container Boursin...
NEWS
November 13, 2015
Now that Guinness says it will no longer use isinglass, a common gelatin-like beer filtering agent made from dried fish bladders, vegans can finally enjoy a guilt-free pint of the famous Irish stout, right? Guess again, carrot top. Look more closely and you'll find plenty of animals hiding in your glass of suds. Pigs, horses and even bugs are sacrificed in the beer-making process. To be clear, there are no actual carcasses in beer. In fact, there were never any fish bladders, either.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011 | BY COLIN COVERT, Minneapolis Star Tribune
BUDDY-COP FILMS have jumped every shark in the sea, but "The Guard" imagines a wickedly funny fish-out-of-water twist. An incorruptible black FBI man travels to rural West Ireland to coordinate a big international drug bust. His only real ally among the useless local cops is an abrasive bugger with a taste for drugs, prostitutes, Russian literature and racist wisecracks. Sgt. Gerry Boyle (Brendan Gleeson) hasn't got much use for the niceties of the law. If he finds drugs at the scene of a car crash, he'll swallow them.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michie Taylor's huge plant is back inside now, soaking up the sun through sliding-glass doors. When the furnace comes on more steadily, Taylor will turn on a fountain near the plant's base - to bathe it in humidity. It is, after all, a plant of distinction. A plant of accomplishment. The night-blooming cereus, a seven-foot-tall specimen Taylor has tended for the last decade, is now the Guinness world record-holder for "most blooms in one night for the same plant" of Selenicereus grandiflorus.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jen Cassidy knelt by the clock and counted down the seconds. "Three, two, one, go!" Her husband, John, took a deep breath and blew. He had just one hour and, if all went well, more than 436 balloon animals to go. That's what he needed to do to win back - for the second time - the Guinness record for the world's fastest balloon sculptor. Almost two years ago, John Cassidy, an Upper Providence magician who learned to make balloon animals quickly to satisfy the impatience of children, won the record by twisting 367 balloon animals in one hour.
NEWS
July 24, 2010
MARGATE, N.J. - An attempt to break the Guinness world record for the most people simultaneously blowing bubbles in multiple locations has burst. The effort raised more than $18,000 for autism research, its organizer said. Isabelle Mosca, the Ventnor woman who organized the attempt in April, said thousands of claims from participants did not follow strict documentation guidelines and would be rejected by the London-based Guinness organization. She said she did not submit the documentation to the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2011
The Guard Brendan Gleeson and Don Cheadle are the improbable cop duo in John Michael McDonagh's (brother of In Bruges' Martin McDonagh) blisteringly funny Irish country caper, in which a brazenly irregular constable and a straight FBI guy go on the hunt for big-time drug smugglers. Flurries of wild, irreverent dialogue and pints of dark, creamy Guinness ensue. R Our Idiot Brother Paul Rudd has the title role - as an exasperatingly naive stoner stumblebum - in this good-natured, goofy comedy.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
McGILLIN'S OLDE Ale House is going green. And, no, I'm not talking about the green beer that they're serving this St. Patrick's Day weekend. If you're thinking of one more reason to down a few pints this weekend at McGillin's - besides wanting to pay homage to a patron saint of Ireland in the oldest continuously operating (since 1860), family-run, beer-centric tavern in the city - consider this: McGillin's also is trying to save the planet. Seriously. Christopher Mullins Sr., 65, of Narberth, the tavern's genial co-owner (along with his wife, Mary Ellen, who supervises the kitchen)
NEWS
August 18, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sky was just darkening and the nightly bug-song was striking up when the rambling mound of greenery on Michie Taylor's back deck began to move. Ever so slowly, ever so subtly, five-inch pods began to split. Openings the size of quarters appeared. Then half dollars. Roberta Lindsay was taking pictures. A neighbor was shooting video. Carolyn Swatsler crouched by a bud, examining it. She could have sworn the motion was perceptible. And Taylor? She was nervous, flitting among the nearly two dozen guests, ready for the big moment.
NEWS
January 25, 2006 | Reviewed by David Hiltbrand Inquirer Staff Writer
Utterly Monkey Nick Laird Harper Perennial. 344 pp. $13.95 Reviewed by David Hiltbrand Inquirer Staff Writer As the spouse of It novelist Zadie Smith, Nick Laird is famous by association - which means his first novel, the slender but diverting Utterly Monkey, is getting reviewed far more extensively than it normally would. Take that to heart, aspiring writers, and marry up. This is the tale of Danny Williams, who grew up hardscrabble in Northern Ireland and is now working, with some qualms, as a lawyer in London.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2016 | By Ed Barkowitz and Janaki Chadha, STAFF WRITERS
The question to the kids Tuesday morning was simple, yet profound: What would they do if they were president? The answers — given in essay form by Philadelphia students ages 7 to 17 — were compelling. Many answered that they would end racism or solve the issue of contentious police relations in their communities. Maybe they were light on specifics, but they were full of emotion. Or humor: One boy, sweltering in the sun with uncounted others, wrote that if he were president, he'd be writing in the air-conditioning.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
Could the timing possibly be better? Only weeks after his Metropolitan Opera appointment, Yannick Nézet-Séguin has come out with the latest installment of his series of Mozart opera recordings from Deutsche Grammophon, and it's the piece long regarded with the most affection - The Marriage of Figaro . It joins a cluster of on-demand Nézet-Séguin videos that includes the Shostakovich Symphony No. 13 on the Berlin Philharmonic's Digital...
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
So it finally happened: After years of speculation, the Metropolitan Opera appointed Yannick Nézet-Séguin to replace James Levine as music director. Naturally, the opera world wants to know what that will look like. And they want to know now - although he doesn't fully take on the position until 2020-21 and opera companies work four years in advance. Nonetheless, in a Thursday-morning video interview from Osaka after a Philadelphia Orchestra tour concert, he says he'll be working with the Met as early as this fall.
NEWS
June 3, 2016
By David Patrick Stearns FOR THE INQUIRER The time in Osaka was 11 p.m. Thursday as Yannick Nézet-Séguin faced a live video interview to announce his Metropolitan Opera appointment to a still-waking-up United States. On the Philadelphia Orchestra's current tour of the Far East, he had an early concert time - 7 p.m. - but a substantial program anchored by the Brahms Symphony No. 2 . No wonder he sounded more weary than ecstatic when he said, at 10 a.m. East Coast time, "I can't recall a day in my life when I've been more joyful.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, STAFF WRITER
Surgery for Nézet-Séguin Sunday afternoon, he conducted Mahler 's Symphony No. 8 in Verizon Hall, and on Monday, Philadelphia Orchestra music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin was at Penn Medicine for surgery. The conductor, suffering from an epigastric hernia, underwent outpatient surgery, orchestra rep Katherine Blodgett said. Blodgett said she did not know whether the surgery had been scheduled or was necessitated by a sudden condition. After a three- to four-week recovery, Nézet-Séguin is expected to be back on the podium here starting April 8. He has canceled a March 20 appearance with the Berlin Philharmonic.
NEWS
January 24, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Even staunch Bruckner devotees are inevitably bewildered by the range of options presented by the Symphony No. 4 . In the wake of the composer's endless rewrites, seven editions, some radically different, are available. But the lack of a consensus text may well be encouraging Yannick Nézet-Séguin's evolving approach to the piece, between his 2011 Montreal Orchestre Métropolitain recording and Thursday's Philadelphia Orchestra performance at the Kimmel Center. His switch in editions from Haas to Nowak is important to Brucknerphiles - but it is his approach to the symphony's sound and gesture that suggests more profound, individualistic rethinking.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Yannick Nézet-Séguin's fifth season as Philadelphia Orchestra music director might not immediately look that different from the previous four. In some ways, that's intentional. Nézet-Séguin has often talked about the advantage in creating a familylike circle of performers - such as Karen Cargill, who was memorably featured in this season's Messiah and who will be back in May 2017 for the Mahler Symphony No. 3 . Certain composers don't stay away long: Now that Nézet-Séguin has conducted all of Rachmaninoff's symphonies, guest conductor Stéphane Denève will cover the composer's piano/orchestral works over three separate concerts April 27-29, 2017.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra has offered new information regarding the compensation of its music director. After a Nov. 22 Inquirer article about the orchestra's finances, the Philadelphia Orchestra Association reported that in addition to paying $519,319 in 2013 to Yannick Nézet-Séguin, it paid the IRS $227,950 on his behalf for taxes, plus $12,564 for primarily travel-related expenses. "When an orchestra pays a foreign national as an individual independent contractor, as is the case with Yannick, it must pay taxes directly to the government, and those taxes are excluded from the total that appears on the 990," said orchestra chairman Richard B. Worley in a Nov. 24 email.
NEWS
November 13, 2015
Now that Guinness says it will no longer use isinglass, a common gelatin-like beer filtering agent made from dried fish bladders, vegans can finally enjoy a guilt-free pint of the famous Irish stout, right? Guess again, carrot top. Look more closely and you'll find plenty of animals hiding in your glass of suds. Pigs, horses and even bugs are sacrificed in the beer-making process. To be clear, there are no actual carcasses in beer. In fact, there were never any fish bladders, either.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Another triumph for Yannick Nézet-Séguin: The news leaked out Wednesday that the Philadelphia Orchestra music director is Musical America's Artist of the Year. The honor puts him on the cover of Musical America Worldwide: The International Directory of the Performing Arts, a phone-book-size $125 annual publication considered the bible of the classical music industry, a complete Who's Who and How to Find Them. "I am deeply and sincerely honored to accept this prestigious honor," said Nézet-Séguin in a statement released by the Philadelphia Orchestra.
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