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FOOD
March 15, 2012 | By Elizabeth Karmel, Associated Press
Try this Guinness-marinated steak sandwich for St. Paddy's Day, a refreshing change from stew or corned beef and cabbage.   Guinness Marinated Flank Steak Sandwiches With Grilled Onions and Boursin Cheese Makes 4 servings 2-pound flank steak or London broil, at least 1-inch thick 14.9-ounce can Guinness beer 2 large red onions, cut into 1/2-inch slices 1 small container Boursin...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011 | BY COLIN COVERT, Minneapolis Star Tribune
BUDDY-COP FILMS have jumped every shark in the sea, but "The Guard" imagines a wickedly funny fish-out-of-water twist. An incorruptible black FBI man travels to rural West Ireland to coordinate a big international drug bust. His only real ally among the useless local cops is an abrasive bugger with a taste for drugs, prostitutes, Russian literature and racist wisecracks. Sgt. Gerry Boyle (Brendan Gleeson) hasn't got much use for the niceties of the law. If he finds drugs at the scene of a car crash, he'll swallow them.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michie Taylor's huge plant is back inside now, soaking up the sun through sliding-glass doors. When the furnace comes on more steadily, Taylor will turn on a fountain near the plant's base - to bathe it in humidity. It is, after all, a plant of distinction. A plant of accomplishment. The night-blooming cereus, a seven-foot-tall specimen Taylor has tended for the last decade, is now the Guinness world record-holder for "most blooms in one night for the same plant" of Selenicereus grandiflorus.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jen Cassidy knelt by the clock and counted down the seconds. "Three, two, one, go!" Her husband, John, took a deep breath and blew. He had just one hour and, if all went well, more than 436 balloon animals to go. That's what he needed to do to win back - for the second time - the Guinness record for the world's fastest balloon sculptor. Almost two years ago, John Cassidy, an Upper Providence magician who learned to make balloon animals quickly to satisfy the impatience of children, won the record by twisting 367 balloon animals in one hour.
NEWS
July 24, 2010
MARGATE, N.J. - An attempt to break the Guinness world record for the most people simultaneously blowing bubbles in multiple locations has burst. The effort raised more than $18,000 for autism research, its organizer said. Isabelle Mosca, the Ventnor woman who organized the attempt in April, said thousands of claims from participants did not follow strict documentation guidelines and would be rejected by the London-based Guinness organization. She said she did not submit the documentation to the group.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
McGILLIN'S OLDE Ale House is going green. And, no, I'm not talking about the green beer that they're serving this St. Patrick's Day weekend. If you're thinking of one more reason to down a few pints this weekend at McGillin's - besides wanting to pay homage to a patron saint of Ireland in the oldest continuously operating (since 1860), family-run, beer-centric tavern in the city - consider this: McGillin's also is trying to save the planet. Seriously. Christopher Mullins Sr., 65, of Narberth, the tavern's genial co-owner (along with his wife, Mary Ellen, who supervises the kitchen)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2011
The Guard Brendan Gleeson and Don Cheadle are the improbable cop duo in John Michael McDonagh's (brother of In Bruges' Martin McDonagh) blisteringly funny Irish country caper, in which a brazenly irregular constable and a straight FBI guy go on the hunt for big-time drug smugglers. Flurries of wild, irreverent dialogue and pints of dark, creamy Guinness ensue. R Our Idiot Brother Paul Rudd has the title role - as an exasperatingly naive stoner stumblebum - in this good-natured, goofy comedy.
NEWS
August 18, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sky was just darkening and the nightly bug-song was striking up when the rambling mound of greenery on Michie Taylor's back deck began to move. Ever so slowly, ever so subtly, five-inch pods began to split. Openings the size of quarters appeared. Then half dollars. Roberta Lindsay was taking pictures. A neighbor was shooting video. Carolyn Swatsler crouched by a bud, examining it. She could have sworn the motion was perceptible. And Taylor? She was nervous, flitting among the nearly two dozen guests, ready for the big moment.
NEWS
January 25, 2006 | Reviewed by David Hiltbrand Inquirer Staff Writer
Utterly Monkey Nick Laird Harper Perennial. 344 pp. $13.95 Reviewed by David Hiltbrand Inquirer Staff Writer As the spouse of It novelist Zadie Smith, Nick Laird is famous by association - which means his first novel, the slender but diverting Utterly Monkey, is getting reviewed far more extensively than it normally would. Take that to heart, aspiring writers, and marry up. This is the tale of Danny Williams, who grew up hardscrabble in Northern Ireland and is now working, with some qualms, as a lawyer in London.
SPORTS
July 24, 2010 | By Bob Kelley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hats, ejections, slippery fan, and no Guinness After a badly blown call, the hats and ejections flew furiously at Camden Yards, and now Orioles first baseman Ty Wigginton is looking at a three-game suspension. Among the lowlights from Thursday night: Wigginton screaming himself red in the face, appearing to chest-bump (he denied it) first-base umpire Gary Darling, who later admitted he should have called a pickoff on the Twins' J.J. Hardy, then throwing down his hat. Baltimore pitching coach Rick Kranitz ejected - from the dugout, no less - for "sarcastic" (his term)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 21, 2014
 G UINNESS is one of the greatest, most valuable brand names in beer. From its familiar harp logo to its stenciled typeface to Arthur Guinness' famous signature, everything about it is immediately recognizable. Even its bubbles have a trademark look. You think of Guinness, you think of rich, dark, smooth Irish stout - the biggest-selling, most famous dark beer on the planet. The problem is, that's the only thing you think of. As good as Guinness is, it's really only good for one thing.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Daniel Webster, For The Inquirer
Unless he had monitored his audience's vital signs just before the end of Mahler's Symphony No. 2 , Philadelphia Orchestra conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin could hardly have predicted the emotional fever that greeted the final ecstatic chords at the Kimmel Center on Thursday. The sense of release at the end of 90 minutes of Mahler's incremental structuring almost guarantees a momentous response, but this performance made its effect on emotional terms as well as on orchestral virtuosity.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Is it backlash or breakthrough? Maybe both with Yannick Nézet-Séguin's new Schumann symphony set on Deutsche Grammophon that recently hit the market: It's both adored and dismissed, though not for any uniform reasons. Rather than recording the symphonies over time with one of his home orchestras (Rotterdam or Philadelphia), Nézet-Séguin opted for the Chamber Orchestra of Europe (COE) during an intensive series of concerts at Paris' Cité de la Musique, plus a patch session. The reaction in England (where the set has been out longer)
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Youthful embraces and lonely leave-taking occupied each half of the Philadelphia Orchestra's Thursday concert at the Kimmel Center with an unexpectedly particular characteristic in common: Unguarded emotionalism unlike anything else heard from the respective composers, whether in Bartok's Violin Concerto No. 1 or Bruckner's Symphony No. 9 . Smartly devised by music director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the concert had long-term contour, starting...
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
For the opening salvo of four different Mozart programs in three days, conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin on Thursday night modulated his influence to various degrees. His jumpiness in the Overture to Così fan tutte left you wondering what happened to the gracefully rounded waves of Mozart's main theme. In parts of a symphony, he stepped back and let it flow. Presiding over a piano concerto, he left a personal stamp. By the end of this weekend of overtures, symphonies, and piano concertos - so much for new formats - listeners should have a firm idea of whether this Philadelphia Orchestra music director has any firm ideas about Mozart.
NEWS
September 13, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though Philadelphia Orchestra music directors have long had a teaching relationship with the Curtis Institute of Music, Yannick Nézet-Séguin has been formally appointed to inaugurate a four-year conducting program that's described more in terms of mentoring than teaching. "I have become the musician and conductor that I am today because of every teacher I have had, and it is with this in mind that I look forward to becoming the first mentor conductor at Curtis," Nézet-Séguin said in a statement released this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
MONTREAL - Few operas are as daunting and intoxicating for performers and audiences as Wagner's. So is it any wonder that conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin compared his first full foray into that world as a coming-of-age moment? "There's not another context in which I'd rather lose my Wagner virginity," he declared before Sunday's concert version of Lohengrin at Festival Lanaudière, held annually in the countryside north of Montreal. Though a standard at the world's large opera houses, Lohengrin is seldom heard elsewhere; this was its Quebec premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Yannick Nézet-Séguin might be expected to end his first season as Philadelphia Orchestra music director with some sort of awesome bang, if only because he's that kind of guy. Instead, the final program of the Kimmel Center season on Thursday had a "to be continued" quality, with fairly standard repertoire in somewhat unusual configuration, but in performances that showed something extraordinary is underway here. Though Nézet-Séguin's taste in programming has expanded the orchestra's repertoire with choral works that are often left to organizations that have trouble affording the Kimmel Center, this concert was anchored by the Brahms Violin Concerto with Gil Shaham in top form, but with the conductor generating a synergy one seldom hears in this oft-played piece, even in recordings.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - Tracking conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin requires maps of North America and Europe, though he's close to the city that's loving him back in this month's guest appearances: a Metropolitan Opera La Traviata revival that's likely to be hotter than most new productions. The three principal singers all made debuts of sorts Thursday: Soprano Diana Damrau sang her first Violetta, Plácido Domingo added another baritone role to his repertoire with Germont, and Albanian tenor Saimir Pirgu, as Alfredo, sang his first major role here.
NEWS
March 15, 2013
McGILLIN'S OLDE Ale House is going green. And, no, I'm not talking about the green beer that they're serving this St. Patrick's Day weekend. If you're thinking of one more reason to down a few pints this weekend at McGillin's - besides wanting to pay homage to a patron saint of Ireland in the oldest continuously operating (since 1860), family-run, beer-centric tavern in the city - consider this: McGillin's also is trying to save the planet. Seriously. Christopher Mullins Sr., 65, of Narberth, the tavern's genial co-owner (along with his wife, Mary Ellen, who supervises the kitchen)
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