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Guinness

SPORTS
February 3, 2005 | By Phil Sheridan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Getting to the beach is a breeze. Parking at the beach is a breeze. Everything about Jacksonville Beach is a breeze except the breeze. It's more of a gale. The rain is coming in sideways. It's like being on the set of The Perfect Storm, and you're George Clooney. It is 47 degrees, and the wind makes it feel closer to 30. The rain doesn't help. There isn't another living soul on this stretch of beach except for a bird. It is walking against the wind and appears to be muttering to itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2012 | David Hiltbrand
You remember Landau Eugene Murphy Jr.? He was the sixth-season proof positive that America's Got Talent . In the middle of a benefit concert in his native West Virginia last week, he instructed the audience members to refer to the handout sheets they had been furnished. Junior had an agenda. He wanted to set a world record for the most people singing a TV theme song in one place. Are you ready? Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale, A tale of a fateful trip That started from this tropic port Aboard this tiny ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Ah, Ireland, land of black craggy hills, lush green fields, tiny villages with whitewashed cottages looking out onto wee fishing boats bobbing in a bracing sea. The pubs pour creamy-headed stout, the townsfolk are a dreamy-headed lot, and the air's a'tingle with charm and blarney. Enough already! The Closer You Get is another entry in that increasingly annoying genre of Celtic cinema where the accents are as thick as a slab of breakfast sausage and everybody's got his or her nose in everybody else's business.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Audrey Hepburn, the swanlike, Oscar-winning actress and UNICEF ambassador who described herself as a "skinny broad" or "the other Hepburn," died yesterday of colon cancer at her Swiss villa. She was 63. For a generation that, like her, survived World War II, the woman with the mockingbird laugh and dancing fawn eyes redefined femininity, glamour and political activism. Miss Hepburn, reed-thin, was not slim for fashion's sake, but because of childhood malnutrition. The Belgian-born daughter of Anglo-Dutch parents had endured World War II in food-deprived Arnhem, the Netherlands.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | By Betsey Hansell, FOR THE INQUIRER
If we hadn't tried to save money on a car rental, we would never have met Valentine Butler, the septuagenarian English landowner who welcomed us to her 15th-century farmhouse like a rich aunt entertaining her favorite relatives. Exhausted from a busy year of writing and painting - my husband is a theater critic and I am an artist - we had planned a few days of leisurely garden visits in Somerset before tackling London and a week of marathon play- and museum-going. Because of the bargain price, our travel agent had suggested that we become "Country Rovers," purchasing a car-and-accommodations package offered by the English tour company Discover Britain and sold in this country through travel agents.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | By Robert O'Connor, Special to The Inquirer
Three gunmen have kidnapped Jennifer Guinness, the wife of a prominent Dublin banker who is distantly related to the Guinness brewing family, and demanded a ransom of $2.6 million, police announced yesterday. Jennifer Guinness, 48, was taken from her suburban Dublin home Tuesday afternoon by three armed and masked men, who, as they left, made a demand for two million Irish pounds in ransom (about $2.6 million). Guinness' husband, John, 51, is chairman of Guinness & Mahon, a Dublin merchant bank.
LIVING
April 13, 1986 | By Lorenzo Benet, Los Angeles Daily News
Extensive revisions have become a way of life at the New York offices of the Guinness Book of World Records. People there keep track of 20,000 world-record categories - everything from how long a human being can ride a roller coaster (503 hours at last count), to the most push-ups (25,753 by Paul Lynch in London). Every 12 months, however, editors have to toss out almost one-quarter of the old records to make room for the new record holders, folks who for some reason or other never got their names in the newspaper and figured this was the next best thing.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - No need to bell this cat: A gray-and-white tabby named Smokey has cat-apulted to fame with purring so loud it has been recorded at a potentially record-setting 73 decibels. The British community college that measured the sound said it peaked at 16 times louder than that of the average cat. By some estimates, that is about as noisy as busy traffic, a hair dryer or a vacuum cleaner. The 12-year-old, ordinary-size feline first came to national attention last month when her owner, Ruth Adams, decided to run a local competition for the most powerful purr.
NEWS
August 28, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, USA Today and the Washington Post.)
Former local boy Dick Clark will be honored Sept. 14 by the Guinness Book of World Records at the first Guinness Supreme Achievement Award ceremony in Beverly Hills. No, it's not for looking forever young but for keeping TV's American Bandstand spinning for 35 years. Since its 1952 debut in WFIL-TV's old studios at 46th and Market Streets, with the late Bob Horn hosting, the show has played more than 65,000 records, greeted more than 10,000 musical guests and featured more than 600,000 dancing teens.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
With the death of John Gielgud last month, Alec Guinness is now the sole survivor of England's great generation of acting knights. And there's no more delightful way to celebrate his gift than Kind Hearts and Coronets. This 1949 black comedy combines macabre wit and mordant satire of the British class system in one peerless package. Kind Hearts and Coronets was excoriated in its day by affronted moralists who did not care for its lighthearted attitude toward murder and its general subversiveness.
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