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Guinness

NEWS
July 31, 2001 | Daily News Staff Report
OK, kids, so you can't shoot a rubber band farther than the 99 feet that Leo Clouser shot one in Wyomissing in 1999. And you can't grow a pumpkin heavier than the one Gerry Checkon grew in Altoona that weighed 1,131 pounds. And your shoes aren't bigger than the 28.5 size worn by Matthew McGrory. Don't despair. You, too, can get into the "Guinness Book of World Records. " All you have to do is join in on the creation of a 25-by-32-foot logo for the X Games, coming here Aug. 17-22, using Lego blocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Kind Hearts and Coronets, the crown jewel among the great black comedies produced by the Ealing Studio in England after World War II, the parts of Ascoyne d'Ascoyne, Henry d'Ascoyne, Canon d'Ascoyne, Admiral d'Ascoyne, General d'Ascoyne, Lady Agatha d'Ascoyne, Lord d'Ascoyne, and the Duke of Chalfont are acted with equal brio and brilliance. Alec Guinness, in a peerless display of comic versatility, took all eight roles. Each of the unfortunate members of the Ascoyne clan meets an untimely end at the hands of the sleek Louis Mazzini (Dennis Price)
FOOD
April 26, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Americans love "The World's Largest . . . (Anything). " Small wonder that our typical restaurant portions for one would feed a family of four. But the biggest foods of all are celebrated in the 1995 edition of The Guinness Book of World Records. Surprisingly, America doesn't corner the market on all the records. Here are some of those reeeeally big foods: The largest cake, a mere 128,238 pounds, was baked in the shape of Alabama. The largest cookie, made in Arcadia, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1987 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
"I have often noticed that dedicated actors who work exclusively in the theater are usually contemptuous of those who work in films," writes one of this century's most dedicated actors. " . . . That is, until they themselves are inveigled into a film and find that money can be just as satisfying as artistic integrity. " Artistic integrity is writ on every page of Blessings in Disguise by Alec Guinness (Warner Books, $9.95), the handsome paperback edition of a work destined to be a classic on the show-biz bookshelf.
NEWS
August 1, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, USA Today and the Washington Post.)
Schoolboy John Kevin Hill's flight across the United States this summer has gotten him into the 1988 Guinness Book of World Records, it was announced yesterday. Hill, 11, flew 3,500 miles between Los Angeles and Washington from June 24 to July 1. "I don't have the exact wording right here in front of me," said David Boehm, the American editor of the book, to be published in October. "But the gist is, John Kevin will be in the Guinness book as the youngest person ever to fly such a long distance.
NEWS
August 12, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. McGuinness, 88, of Woodbury, founder and longtime manager of McGuinness Funeral Home in Woodbury, died of congestive heart failure Monday, Aug. 9, at his home. Mr. McGuinness, known for his patience and listening skills, was cut out for the job of dealing with the loss of a loved one, his son Bill said. However, he also could have made a good politician. When Mr. McGuinness opened his funeral home in 1950 with just his wife as a business partner, he would go to four or five diners each morning to meet people and promote his business.
NEWS
August 6, 2004 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie L. McGuinness, 81, onetime coach of the Mighty Macs, Immaculata College's championship women's basketball team, died of cancer Wednesday at her Woodbury home. Born in Woodbury, Mrs. McGuinness graduated in 1940 from Woodbury High School, where she met her husband, James A. McGuinness. Ten years later, the couple started the McGuinness Funeral Home in Woodbury. They later opened funeral homes in Runnemede and Washington Township. Mrs. McGuinness earned her bachelor's degree in physical education from Temple University, where she played basketball and field hockey.
FOOD
March 13, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
When Sean Fadden enters a pub and orders a pint of Guinness Stout, he makes a point of listening to the sound of the draft system. Is it pretty much silent? Does it make a slight hissing noise? He also watches how the barkeep pours from the tap; how the glass is held; and if the beer is allowed to rest before it's completely topped off. And when the brew finally reaches him, he silently measures the size of its creamy crown. Is the head flat or oversized, or does it have what he calls fisheyes?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The comedies made after World War II at England's Ealing Studios are justly celebrated as the golden age of British screen comedy, and its king was Alec Guinness. The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), along with Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Man in the White Suit and The Ladykillers, forms a classic foursome. Guinness filmed them after making his mark in Dickens in the screen versions of Great Expectations and Oliver Twist. He is at his most disarming and deceptive peak as Henry Holland, the bank clerk in The Lavender Hill Mob. The movie teamed him with the gifted Stanley Holloway and two rising Cockney comedians, Sidney James and Alfie Bass.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A judge yesterday came down hard on the men convicted in Britain's biggest white-collar fraud, sentencing the former head of brewer Guinness PLC to five years in prison and a co-defendant to a record fine. Ernest Saunders, former Guinness chairman and chief executive officer, was sentenced to five years for theft and conspiracy and 3 1/2 years for false accounting in the scandal stemming from the company's multibillion-dollar takeover of a Scottish distiller four years ago. The sentences will run concurrently.
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