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Guinness

NEWS
February 20, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Age-appropriate repertoire is a nagging question for young conductors: Should they conduct nothing deeper than Carmina Burana until age 40? Yannick N?zet-S?guin, 34, shows no caution in this regard: He's a "ninth symphony" kind of guy, embracing late-period Bruckner, Tchaikovsky, and Mahler with unexpected success. What of the flashier, youthful stuff that figures into everyday concerts? At his Lincoln Center tour stop with the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra on Wednesday, he faced a program of potboiler Liszt and Richard Strauss as well as the Philadelphia Orchestra search committee in the audience, eager to hear what he's like in calling-card repertoire and with the near-world-class orchestra he has headed for almost two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Of all the paradoxes: Conductor Yannick N?zet-S?guin became the hero of his own concert by ceding the spotlight to all around him, making them look terrific - or better than they normally might. In this 34-year-old French Canadian conductor's reengagement Thursday with the Philadelphia Orchestra (as the music-director search goes into high gear), nothing was safe or certain, from his slightly strange concert attire (a long dark tie) to the ultra-slow tempos he allowed pianist Nicholas Angelich to take in Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 1. In a way, N?zet-S?guin showed what life would be like in a typical week with the conductor serving multiple agendas: the soloist's repertoire and established interpretation, plus the cause of modern music, in this case the 1980 Orion by the late Claude Vivier.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Conductor Yannick N?zet-S?guin seems too amiable to be an original. And yet originality is exactly what seems to have emerged from the up-and-coming 34-year-old Quebecois in the year between his last Philadelphia Orchestra engagement and the one coming this week. Music that's normally considered second-rate suddenly sounds substantial under his direction. His programs are full of important, provocative new music. And among established masterworks, normally urbane Maurice Ravel works lose their cool in his soon-to-be-released EMI recording debut with the Rotterdam Philharmonic, where he is music director, leaving you wondering why that doesn't always happen.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2009 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From here to Hong Kong and myriad ports in between, millions will pause today at 17:59 on the 24-hour clock and raise a glass to the 18th-century Irish brewer who made the day worth celebrating. The man: Arthur Guinness. While today is his 284th birthday, it was 250 years ago, on Dec. 31, 1759, that the 34-year-old from County Kildare signed a lease on a four-acre dilapidated ale brewery near St. James's Gate on the edge of Dublin and began producing the dry stout that bears his name.
NEWS
August 6, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra's search for its eighth music director has entered a particularly treacherous stretch. Conductors' datebooks being what they are, filled three or four years in advance, the orchestra will have to act soon. But it doesn't have quite enough information on several of the candidates. Rock, hard place. The search committees have vowed that no one will be hired before making more than one visit to the podium - an unimpressive act of restraint when you consider how critical a decision this is. And yet here at the Mostly Mozart Festival Tuesday night was the young Montrealer who is the current front-runner: Yannick N?zet-S?guin.
NEWS
January 25, 2006 | Reviewed by David Hiltbrand Inquirer Staff Writer
Utterly Monkey Nick Laird Harper Perennial. 344 pp. $13.95 Reviewed by David Hiltbrand Inquirer Staff Writer As the spouse of It novelist Zadie Smith, Nick Laird is famous by association - which means his first novel, the slender but diverting Utterly Monkey, is getting reviewed far more extensively than it normally would. Take that to heart, aspiring writers, and marry up. This is the tale of Danny Williams, who grew up hardscrabble in Northern Ireland and is now working, with some qualms, as a lawyer in London.
SPORTS
February 3, 2005 | By Phil Sheridan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Getting to the beach is a breeze. Parking at the beach is a breeze. Everything about Jacksonville Beach is a breeze except the breeze. It's more of a gale. The rain is coming in sideways. It's like being on the set of The Perfect Storm, and you're George Clooney. It is 47 degrees, and the wind makes it feel closer to 30. The rain doesn't help. There isn't another living soul on this stretch of beach except for a bird. It is walking against the wind and appears to be muttering to itself.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michie Taylor's huge plant is back inside now, soaking up the sun through sliding-glass doors. When the furnace comes on more steadily, Taylor will turn on a fountain near the plant's base - to bathe it in humidity. It is, after all, a plant of distinction. A plant of accomplishment. The night-blooming cereus, a seven-foot-tall specimen Taylor has tended for the last decade, is now the Guinness world record-holder for "most blooms in one night for the same plant" of Selenicereus grandiflorus.
NEWS
August 18, 2004 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sky was just darkening and the nightly bug-song was striking up when the rambling mound of greenery on Michie Taylor's back deck began to move. Ever so slowly, ever so subtly, five-inch pods began to split. Openings the size of quarters appeared. Then half dollars. Roberta Lindsay was taking pictures. A neighbor was shooting video. Carolyn Swatsler crouched by a bud, examining it. She could have sworn the motion was perceptible. And Taylor? She was nervous, flitting among the nearly two dozen guests, ready for the big moment.
NEWS
August 6, 2004 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie L. McGuinness, 81, onetime coach of the Mighty Macs, Immaculata College's championship women's basketball team, died of cancer Wednesday at her Woodbury home. Born in Woodbury, Mrs. McGuinness graduated in 1940 from Woodbury High School, where she met her husband, James A. McGuinness. Ten years later, the couple started the McGuinness Funeral Home in Woodbury. They later opened funeral homes in Runnemede and Washington Township. Mrs. McGuinness earned her bachelor's degree in physical education from Temple University, where she played basketball and field hockey.
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