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NEWS
August 10, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Mark Shark strolls up South Street yesterday with the guitar he redeemed from a pawn shop recently. Shark said he had to borrow money on the instrument four months ago. He's been playing about nine years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993 | By Dan DeLuca, FOR THE INQUIRER
These days, most popular "alternative" guitar-rock gets in your face with blasts of grungy distortion or walls of fluttering white noise. The Sundays and Luna2, however, have precise, formal sonic agendas. The Sundays - perhaps the most delicate and tame of the plethora of new British female-fronted guitar bands - rely on Harriet Wheeler's girlish vocals, and Dave Gavurin's Smiths-style ambient guitar jangle. And Luna2 is based on Dean Wareham's exacting guitar, which concocts a shimmering, tensile Velvet Underground sound that is somnambulant and driving at the same time.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sharon Isbin is hardly passive when it comes to getting new concertos written for her somewhat overlooked instrument. She once buttonholed a composer in line at her New York City post office. "I said, 'Hey, would you like to write a guitar concerto?' He said, 'Call me back next year.' That went on for eight years. " Isbin even came up with a compositional scheme for the composer in question, John Corigliano - she suggested a tale of French troubadours - and eventually got her concerto.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Andres Segovia, the guitar virtuoso who died Tuesday at 94 in his Madrid apartment, was recognized as the man who restored the guitar to its place in classical music. Segovia's burning missionary zeal had raised the guitar from its tawdry associations with Spanish Gypsy caves to place it in concert halls around the world. In a career spanning more than 70 years, Segovia unswervingly devoted himself to proving the guitar equal to the violin, piano or cello as a solo instrument and to reviving old music and commissioning new works for the instrument.
LIVING
June 19, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the nice things about auctions, particularly those held in the suburbs when the summer lull begins, is that they offer items you are unlikely to encounter at conventional retail outlets. Two sales this weekend will offer examples of such unconventional items, including folk art and tramp art, Navajo crafts, and a classic Les Paul electric guitar signed (and played) by Paul himself. The Les Paul guitar will be among the more than 700 lots offered by Briggs Auction at its special estate antique sale beginning at 5 p.m. today at the gallery, 1347 Naamans Creek Rd., Garnet Valley.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Harvey Lee "Hiamsiam" Nelson, who played guitar at area clubs and lounges for more than 30 years, died Sunday. He was 77 and lived in North Philadelphia. Nelson, who also was known as "Colonel Lee" or "Doc" or "The Old Man," picked up a guitar at age 16 and taught himself to play. He attended auto mechanic school, and for most of his life filled in between gigs fixing cars. In later years he gave up working on cars because the automakers started making it "complicated" under the hood.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Earnest American guitar-rock bands promoting strong musical values are due for a comeback. Today, we're offering some primo candidates. For those who adore the rootsy, understated, country-tinged rock popularized by the Band, the Byrds, Little Feat and Graham Parsons, get to your music emporium and pick up "Continental Drifters" (Monkey Hill/Ichiban, . ). At turns earthy and whimsical while always tuneful, the Drifters will get your body swaying to the romantic trials of "Mixed Messages" and the (aching waltz time)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1996 | By Bill Ricchini, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was fitting that two songs into his performance at the Theatre of Living Arts on Tuesday night, Michael Hedges chose the Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" as his first in a series of classic-rock covers. The timeless Beatles tune could be a theme song for this experimental guitar virtuoso - famous for making his guitar sing, cry, scream, and yes, even weep. For more than 15 years, Hedges has been pushing the boundaries of modern guitar. His sound is distinct - ringing with bright harmonics, deep sonic textures, and an ever-present driving bass line.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1993 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael Hedges, rock guitar wizard, is a new breed. The post-punk movement, which cheers rhythmic emphasis and leers at stylized melody and harmony, has left few guitar virtuosos in its wake. During Saturday night's sold-out show at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside, Hedges - who developed as an artist during punk's reign - demonstrated that rock virtuosity has not been sneered out of existence, but has been handed a new set of rhythmically urgent priorities. And he did it on acoustic guitar.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Here's the Cliffs Notes version of Dave Navarro's career: Played the role of the swarthy guitar hero with the Rasputin-style good looks in Jane's Addiction, a once-important alt-rock outfit whose relevance continues to diminish in direct proportion to the number of times the band re-forms for lucrative nostalgia tours. Rarely wore a shirt. Was a hired gun for the Red Hot Chili Peppers for a few albums, filling the hole left by a succession of guitar slingers who overdosed, went insane, or both.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Shortly after Mauritanian vocalist Noura Mint Seymali stepped to the microphone in West Philadelphia on Sunday night, it became clear just how special the closing event of Crossroads Music's 2014-15 concert season would be. As the full-bodied electric bass of Ousmane Touré and the drumming of Philly's own Matthew Tinari began to pump behind her, Seymali delivered trilling and thrilling lines of exotic vocalization. Her confident control of melisma was impressive; her youthful power was well-measured (although it did require some quick sound-mix adjustment so she wouldn't overwhelm everything)
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the Downingtown High School West marching band to Nashville recording studios, it's been a trajectory of long odds - and long hours - for Liz Longley and Sarah Zimmermann. The Chester County natives met in the marching band as clarinet-playing sophomores, and spent their high school years singing and playing guitar at every gig they could book in the Philadelphia region. But both had bigger dreams after their 2006 graduation. And in March, just days apart, each released albums with Nashville record labels.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
On the whole, the convulsive bombast and loud-soft- loud dynamics put forth by ascendant Southeastern Pennsylvania rock quartet the Districts proved win-you-over effective at Union Transfer on Saturday night. While snow squalls and mounting wind gusts blew down Spring Garden Street, the sold-out Valentine's Day affair repeatedly heated up the 1,200-plus adoring fans packed inside. As the 90-minute show gathered steam, the hot young band from tiny Lititz - in "The Heart of Lancaster County," as the town motto puts it - repeatedly scaled their grandiose song structures to deliver ever-increasing climactic satisfaction.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Benjamin E. Cavileer Sr., 80, of Egg Harbor City, N.J., who retired in 2001 as the New Gretna toll plaza supervisor on the Garden State Parkway, died of complications from heart problems Thursday, Jan. 22, at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center. Born in Lower Bank, Burlington County, Mr. Cavileer graduated from Egg Harbor High School in 1952 and served as an Army Signal Corps communications specialist at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., and Fort Benning, Ga. He chose what became a three-decade career at Parkway toll stations because "he had a growing family and was looking for something that was steady," son Thomas said.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IN THE MIDDLE of the last century, the height of fashion in China was the Mao suit. Now it's breasts. There had to be some payoff to the Long March. As Julie Makinen , of the Los Angeles Times , reports, "Shapely breasts, often more ample than Mother Nature bestowed, are objects of desire and status symbols in China these days. " Bei-Schwing! Yes, it's difficult to walk around the big city without seeing a variety of methods to enhance the bust, including one ad that says, according to the Times , "Autologous fat breast enhancement can create a legendary breast.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
SOMETIMES, even the master of horror, Stephen King, needs a little inspiration, a certain something to get the bones rolling in his head. That's where John Mellencamp came in, and that's how their project, the musical "Ghost Brothers of Darkland County," took form - evolving from the standard cabin-in-the-woods idea into a supernatural yarn about brothers at odds, set in the South with a backdrop of Spanish moss and the blues. "I had never written a play, let alone a musical, but I figured we'll learn as we go along," King said in a recent interview with the Daily News . "I had done an outline, but once [Mellencamp]
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Before the term indie rock existed, before there was a movement, even before the grunge '90s, there was guitarist-singer J Mascis. On Thursday, he brought songs from his past as well as his new album, Tied to a Star , to World Cafe Live. Philly-based Purling Hiss opened. Mascis' bands Dinosaur and Dinosaur Jr. predated the staged rage of nearly all American-based indie-rock that followed. With his squeaky, Neil Young-ish vocals and guitar licks heavy on the fuzz, Mascis' signature sound (also heard on Sonic Youth projects as well as records from artists such as Mike Watt)
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
A GINGER-HAIRED, scruffy and increasingly tattooed "misfit" from Britain, Ed Sheeran plays guitar, beatboxes and, occasionally, fiddles. He also writes and winsomely sings hip-hop-inflected folk confessionals that enthrall young'uns - and their parents, too. And while clearly connected to the keep-it-real troubadour continuum that stretches, as he said, from "Bob Dylan and Van Morrison to Damien Rice and Jason Mraz," there's never been a phenomenon quite...
NEWS
June 24, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Older is better than newer. It's true for men, and it's true for guitars, according to the (older) guys who traipsed wide-eyed and happy through the Great American Guitar Show at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center in Oaks on Sunday. The fourth-largest guitar show in America, and the biggest in the East, the six-string conclave drew hundreds of men over 40 who first fell for the power, range, and panache of guitars as kids. Wowing women had a lot to do with why a 15-year-old guy would choose a guitar over, say, a clarinet.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
The overdriven guitar riff that opens "Oblivious," the first track on Jessica Lea Mayfield's new album, Make My Head Sing , sends out a loud and distorted message. The 24-year-old songwriter has taken her sound into her own hands. Both her previous albums, With Blasphemy So Heartfelt (2008) and Tell Me (2001), were produced by Black Key Dan Auerbach. They marked Mayfield - who began playing with her family's country band when she was 8 and was writing songs at 11 - as a writer of precise, haunting, slightly rootsy songs that tastemakers tended to categorize as Americana.
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