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NEWS
August 10, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Mark Shark strolls up South Street yesterday with the guitar he redeemed from a pawn shop recently. Shark said he had to borrow money on the instrument four months ago. He's been playing about nine years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993 | By Dan DeLuca, FOR THE INQUIRER
These days, most popular "alternative" guitar-rock gets in your face with blasts of grungy distortion or walls of fluttering white noise. The Sundays and Luna2, however, have precise, formal sonic agendas. The Sundays - perhaps the most delicate and tame of the plethora of new British female-fronted guitar bands - rely on Harriet Wheeler's girlish vocals, and Dave Gavurin's Smiths-style ambient guitar jangle. And Luna2 is based on Dean Wareham's exacting guitar, which concocts a shimmering, tensile Velvet Underground sound that is somnambulant and driving at the same time.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Sharon Isbin is hardly passive when it comes to getting new concertos written for her somewhat overlooked instrument. She once buttonholed a composer in line at her New York City post office. "I said, 'Hey, would you like to write a guitar concerto?' He said, 'Call me back next year.' That went on for eight years. " Isbin even came up with a compositional scheme for the composer in question, John Corigliano - she suggested a tale of French troubadours - and eventually got her concerto.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Andres Segovia, the guitar virtuoso who died Tuesday at 94 in his Madrid apartment, was recognized as the man who restored the guitar to its place in classical music. Segovia's burning missionary zeal had raised the guitar from its tawdry associations with Spanish Gypsy caves to place it in concert halls around the world. In a career spanning more than 70 years, Segovia unswervingly devoted himself to proving the guitar equal to the violin, piano or cello as a solo instrument and to reviving old music and commissioning new works for the instrument.
LIVING
June 19, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the nice things about auctions, particularly those held in the suburbs when the summer lull begins, is that they offer items you are unlikely to encounter at conventional retail outlets. Two sales this weekend will offer examples of such unconventional items, including folk art and tramp art, Navajo crafts, and a classic Les Paul electric guitar signed (and played) by Paul himself. The Les Paul guitar will be among the more than 700 lots offered by Briggs Auction at its special estate antique sale beginning at 5 p.m. today at the gallery, 1347 Naamans Creek Rd., Garnet Valley.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | By JIM NICHOLSON, Daily News Staff Writer
Harvey Lee "Hiamsiam" Nelson, who played guitar at area clubs and lounges for more than 30 years, died Sunday. He was 77 and lived in North Philadelphia. Nelson, who also was known as "Colonel Lee" or "Doc" or "The Old Man," picked up a guitar at age 16 and taught himself to play. He attended auto mechanic school, and for most of his life filled in between gigs fixing cars. In later years he gave up working on cars because the automakers started making it "complicated" under the hood.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Earnest American guitar-rock bands promoting strong musical values are due for a comeback. Today, we're offering some primo candidates. For those who adore the rootsy, understated, country-tinged rock popularized by the Band, the Byrds, Little Feat and Graham Parsons, get to your music emporium and pick up "Continental Drifters" (Monkey Hill/Ichiban, . ). At turns earthy and whimsical while always tuneful, the Drifters will get your body swaying to the romantic trials of "Mixed Messages" and the (aching waltz time)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1996 | By Bill Ricchini, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was fitting that two songs into his performance at the Theatre of Living Arts on Tuesday night, Michael Hedges chose the Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" as his first in a series of classic-rock covers. The timeless Beatles tune could be a theme song for this experimental guitar virtuoso - famous for making his guitar sing, cry, scream, and yes, even weep. For more than 15 years, Hedges has been pushing the boundaries of modern guitar. His sound is distinct - ringing with bright harmonics, deep sonic textures, and an ever-present driving bass line.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1993 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael Hedges, rock guitar wizard, is a new breed. The post-punk movement, which cheers rhythmic emphasis and leers at stylized melody and harmony, has left few guitar virtuosos in its wake. During Saturday night's sold-out show at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside, Hedges - who developed as an artist during punk's reign - demonstrated that rock virtuosity has not been sneered out of existence, but has been handed a new set of rhythmically urgent priorities. And he did it on acoustic guitar.
NEWS
September 6, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Here's the Cliffs Notes version of Dave Navarro's career: Played the role of the swarthy guitar hero with the Rasputin-style good looks in Jane's Addiction, a once-important alt-rock outfit whose relevance continues to diminish in direct proportion to the number of times the band re-forms for lucrative nostalgia tours. Rarely wore a shirt. Was a hired gun for the Red Hot Chili Peppers for a few albums, filling the hole left by a succession of guitar slingers who overdosed, went insane, or both.
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NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Leon Bridges, the 26-year-old rhythm-and-blues singer with the 50-year-old soul, will bring his high-waisted vintage slacks and his playful-to-prayerful love songs to the July 4th Wawa Welcome America! party on the Ben Franklin Parkway. Bridges, who channels Ben E. King's "Stand by Me" and Sam Cooke's "You Send Me" every time he sings his neo-soul serenades, is a young master of old-school vulnerability. "The world leaves a bitter taste in my mouth, girl," he laments on "Coming Home," the title song on his breakout 2015 debut album, which skyrocketed him from obscurity to omnipresence on the concert circuit.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
L ansdowne-reared guitarist Steve Gunn, who has just released his new album, Eyes on the Lines (Matador), is a master of his instrument, incorporating a wide variety of influences into his hypnotic sound. Here, he names his five favorite players of all time: Skip James, the great Mississippi bluesman who is buried in Bala Cynwyd. "He had this indecipherable style. Very mysterious, which coincided with his vocals. His rhythm and his playing is just very unique and strange. " John Cipollina of 1960s psychedelic band Quicksilver Messenger Service.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Steve Gunn makes road music, transfixing guitar rock that gathers momentum as it heads out on an open-ended journey. The 39-year-old blues- and jazz-schooled songwriter casts an exploratory spell on the new Eyes on the Lines (***1/2), his eighth solo album and first for prestige indie label Matador. "You were lost on the road from a different way / Pushed too far, miles away," Gunn sings on Eyes' opener "Ancient Jules. " "Slept in the grass, sky turned gray / Set out in the other direction and found a way. " The song's video finds Gunn traversing green hills and dales near the England-Scotland border until a flat tire runs his motorcycle aground.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Before he played the first of three Friday night sets at the Riddle Ale House in Media, Charlie Gracie worked the crowd, stopping at each table to hug, kiss, and chat up his fans, some of whom have loved him since his 1957 rockabilly hits, "Butterfly" and "Fabulous. " Small, thin, and nimble in a lime blazer over a black T-shirt, silver hair combed straight back, Gracie had turned 80 this month. But through three hours of blistering guitar riffs, his fingers seemed to get only younger.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR DO THIS
If post-minimalism ever had a maximalist, it's composer, guitarist, and trumpeter Rhys Chatham, who makes a rare appearance this week in Philadelphia with his trio. The quintessential Downtown New York figure (though he has lived in Paris since the 1980s) was the eye of the early noise/electronic compositional hurricane. Chatham - at first a flutist - played with Tony Conrad, tuned instruments for LaMonte Young, and led legendarily large guitar armies in the 1970s that included Glenn Branca, a pre-Sonic Youth Thurston Moore, and Lee Ranaldo in an aggressive, volume-rich sonic form inspired by the Ramones.
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
When vocal/guitar recitals work as naturally as the Isabel Leonard/Sharon Isbin concert presented on Tuesday by the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society at the Kimmel Center, you wonder why they don't happen constantly. Leonard's mezzo-soprano maintains its richness when scaled back to an equitable balance with Isbin's discreetly amplified guitar. Both are highly cultivated artists who have worked on this program over the last two years. But such circumstances don't come along often - right down to their complementary black gowns.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ryan "Gooch" Nelson is a lucky man. At 30, the bluesy slide guitarist and his band Gooch and the Motion just signed with famed Philadelphia producer Joe Nicolo's new label, Blackbird, for a debut album ( Comin' Home ) that will have its release party at World Cafe Live on Thursday. Sure, Nelson is fortunate to have a singing style and guitar sound that's deeply reminiscent of his inspirations (Tom Waits, Duane Allman), as well as romantic and unique. But he's also a quadriplegic cancer survivor, so the act of, say, watching March Madness basketball with the windows open in his home in Woodstown, N.J., makes him feel just as lucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Was Mike Calabrese from Broomall, Delaware County, destined from birth to be Lake Street Dive's drummer - the guy with a ton of Gamble and Huff in his DNA, channeling the funky beats into his neo-soul band's old-school dance-party groove? "Ten years before I was born, my parents forged their relationship in a rock cover band called Just Friends during the '70s," Calabrese said during a tour break on his way to Lake Street Dive's sold-out gig Friday at the Fillmore Philadelphia in Fishtown.
NEWS
February 26, 2016
A Hatboro guitar teacher was arrested last week, after police said he had a sexual relationship with a runaway teen from New Jersey whom he allowed to stay at his home. Police said Joseph McGeehan, 52, took in a 16-year-old girl from Burlington Township who ran away from her grandparents' home Feb. 13. Officials said McGeehan picked her up and took her to his home in Hatboro, where she stayed until police found her Feb. 18. He had a sexual relationship with the girl, police said, and took nude photos of her. McGeehan is charged with sexual abuse of a child, concealment of the whereabouts of a child, unlawful contact with a minor, and related charges.
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