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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1989 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
Jimmy Bruno's a bantam-sized guy who plays big guitar. You'll find him Thursday through Saturday nights at Donna Marie's, where he leads a jazz trio, and three days a week at the Green Street Cafe, where he simply manages the jernt. Cognoscenti of the jazz guitar consider Jimmy Bruno to be in the top echelon of his instrument. He is better known in Los Angeles and Las Vegas than he is in this, his hometown, but that is hardly a novel circumstance for a superior musician. He's sort of in hiatus at the moment while his three-time mate, the former Peggy Hawthorne, finishes nurse's training here.
NEWS
July 8, 1992 | By Christopher Mumma, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph F. Mingori, 63, a Philadelphia jeweler, died yesterday at his home in Cherry Hill. Mr. Mingori ran the Joseph F. Mingori Diamond Center at 728 Samson St. for 43 years, inheriting the business from his father. He also was a member of the Philadelphia Jewelers Craft Association. Mr. Mingori also was a guitar player and a member of Musicians Local No. 77. He played with many swing orchestras over the years, including those of Marty Portnoy and Howard Perloff. For 18 years, he played weddings, bar mitzvahs and other social functions.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Next time you get stuck in traffic heading into or out of Philadelphia, imagine what it was like during the 1800s. In those days, it took 10 hours to get to Mont Clare from Boathouse Row in Philadelphia - and the preferred way was by boat on the Schuylkill Canal. What remains of the canal is being celebrated here today at the 11th annual Canal Day, sponsored by the Schuylkill Canal Association. Three areas in and around Mont Clare have been designated to accommodate today's kaleidoscope of activities: St. Michael's Park and Pavilion, Fitzwater Station Restaurant and Container Corp.
NEWS
July 23, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Before he drove down to the Spectrum to see Green Day from his home town of Macungie, in Lehigh County, Derek Hensinger knew that on previous tour stops Billie Joe Armstrong had been plucking a guitar player out of the crowd. So during the band's first encore Tuesday night, after Armstrong had finished with "American Idiot" and asked the crowd, "Are you ready for something really special?" Hensinger was ready. "I g.ot here at 2 o'clock," said the 22-year-old guitarist and singer, who besides being a major Green Day fan plays in his own rock band, Bang Diesel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania, For The Inquirer
I have seen the future of the past, and his name is J.D. McPherson, a thirtysomething cuffed-denim Okie with lacquered hair, iron lungs, and a hound dog howl. McPherson and his gifted retro-rock posse recently released Signs & Signifiers , a bracing collection of tailfin rockabilly, rawboned R&B, and sultry moonstruck balladeering. It is hands-down the feel-good record of the year. McPherson's star has been rising steadily since. NPR and WXPN have taken up his cause, he'll be on the Late Show with David Letterman Dec. 4, and he sold out Johnny Brenda's almost as soon as the show was announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2012
MUSIC JEWEL OF THE BAYOU That's what they call Leroy Thomas and his Zydeco Roadrunners, and that's no exaggeration. He brings blues, R&B, funk and more to his gumbo stew. Allons Danser sponsors these events, so bring your dancing shoes. TK Club, 500 E Hector St., Conshohocken, 7:30 tonight, $20, free lesson 7:30, www.allonsdanser.org .   CROWE ON THE WIRE Not everything Rich Robinson writes fits the blustery Black Crowes blues-rock sound and image he's crafted with brother Chris.
NEWS
May 27, 2007 | By Ryan Flanagan FOR THE INQUIRER
Stephen Interlante has something in his garage that most of us don't. It's a Charles Fox side-bending machine - a wooden contraption the size of a small printing press, loaded with springs, clamps, turn-screws, and three 200-watt lightbulbs. Interlante, 56, of Blackwood, built it himself. He uses it to build guitars. A construction manager, Interlante became interested in guitar-making - lutherie - as a way to combine his two loves: guitars and construction. In 1981, he attended a six-week course at the Guitar Research & Design Center in Vermont and walked away with his first handmade guitar, which is now the only classical guitar he plays.
NEWS
August 30, 1990 | By Cheryl Squadrito, Special to The Inquirer
Scott McClatchy played a six-string acoustic guitar as he sat on a king- size mattress in the bedroom of his Lansdowne house. The makeshift bed is the place where McClatchy writes most of his material. He sang his favorite heartbreak song, "Farewell Lullaby. " "So take my hand, kiss me goodbye. This is my farewell lullaby. " Singer-songwriter McClatchy remembered the first time he played the song, at a South Street club. "I played that song at (J.C.) Dobbs and the whole place shut up and listened," he said.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ginger Coyle didn't know that when she tripped on a step leading to the stage during the national Hard Rock the House Talent Search, she would win. She beat out four other competitors from across the country to win a one-week scholarship to the Hard Rock Academy in Orlando, Fla.; a three-song recording demo deal with Hollywood Records; and a $5,000 Grammy gift bag that contained luggage, cosmetics, a portable CD player, and other goodies....
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Randy Lewis and Los Angeles Times
On July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan stepped onstage at the Newport Folk Festival, plugged in an electric guitar, and changed the course of pop music history. The performance caused a furious reaction. The crowd booed loudly, and folk icon Pete Seeger tried to stop the show. Dylan and his band retreated after three songs, coming back to play an acoustic set. Still, Dylan's provocative move has long been pointed to as a key moment when electric rock music eclipsed folk as the sound of the '60s generation.
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SPORTS
July 11, 2014 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
LEBRON'S most recent drama of free agency - a Melo drama this time, since Carmelo Anthony is in this year's cast of overvalued sneaker salesmen - makes for excellent summertime diversion. Still, wherever LeBron James takes his talents this time will affect the NBA tremendously, since it will determine where a gaggle of other players land, and for how much, and maybe for how long. Similarly, the league will shift according to the next franchise Anthony chooses to ruin. It is an annual pastime in Philadelphia, this dance of courtship and acceptance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By Jonathan Valania, For The Inquirer
I have seen the future of the past, and his name is J.D. McPherson, a thirtysomething cuffed-denim Okie with lacquered hair, iron lungs, and a hound dog howl. McPherson and his gifted retro-rock posse recently released Signs & Signifiers , a bracing collection of tailfin rockabilly, rawboned R&B, and sultry moonstruck balladeering. It is hands-down the feel-good record of the year. McPherson's star has been rising steadily since. NPR and WXPN have taken up his cause, he'll be on the Late Show with David Letterman Dec. 4, and he sold out Johnny Brenda's almost as soon as the show was announced.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Randy Lewis and Los Angeles Times
On July 25, 1965, Bob Dylan stepped onstage at the Newport Folk Festival, plugged in an electric guitar, and changed the course of pop music history. The performance caused a furious reaction. The crowd booed loudly, and folk icon Pete Seeger tried to stop the show. Dylan and his band retreated after three songs, coming back to play an acoustic set. Still, Dylan's provocative move has long been pointed to as a key moment when electric rock music eclipsed folk as the sound of the '60s generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2012
MUSIC JEWEL OF THE BAYOU That's what they call Leroy Thomas and his Zydeco Roadrunners, and that's no exaggeration. He brings blues, R&B, funk and more to his gumbo stew. Allons Danser sponsors these events, so bring your dancing shoes. TK Club, 500 E Hector St., Conshohocken, 7:30 tonight, $20, free lesson 7:30, www.allonsdanser.org .   CROWE ON THE WIRE Not everything Rich Robinson writes fits the blustery Black Crowes blues-rock sound and image he's crafted with brother Chris.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than 30 years, Levittown guitarist and songwriter Danny DeGennaro played with some of music's biggest stars, including members of the Hooters, the Grateful Dead, and the E Street Band. But instead of jamming with DeGennaro on Friday night at John & Peter's in New Hope - one of his favorite clubs - they will say their "final goodbyes" to a man known for his dazzling guitar skills and soulful songs. Meanwhile, police will continue their "round-the-clock" investigation into the shotgun slaying of DeGennaro, 56, in his Bristol Township home on Dec. 28. "We've narrowed the focus of the investigation and are employing surveillance of people of interest," Bucks County Assistant District Attorney Matt Weintraub said Wednesday.
NEWS
July 23, 2009 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Before he drove down to the Spectrum to see Green Day from his home town of Macungie, in Lehigh County, Derek Hensinger knew that on previous tour stops Billie Joe Armstrong had been plucking a guitar player out of the crowd. So during the band's first encore Tuesday night, after Armstrong had finished with "American Idiot" and asked the crowd, "Are you ready for something really special?" Hensinger was ready. "I g.ot here at 2 o'clock," said the 22-year-old guitarist and singer, who besides being a major Green Day fan plays in his own rock band, Bang Diesel.
NEWS
May 27, 2007 | By Ryan Flanagan FOR THE INQUIRER
Stephen Interlante has something in his garage that most of us don't. It's a Charles Fox side-bending machine - a wooden contraption the size of a small printing press, loaded with springs, clamps, turn-screws, and three 200-watt lightbulbs. Interlante, 56, of Blackwood, built it himself. He uses it to build guitars. A construction manager, Interlante became interested in guitar-making - lutherie - as a way to combine his two loves: guitars and construction. In 1981, he attended a six-week course at the Guitar Research & Design Center in Vermont and walked away with his first handmade guitar, which is now the only classical guitar he plays.
NEWS
April 19, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
January was not a good month for Alene McDermott. On Jan. 2, the West Caln singer had a hysterectomy. "I had two large masses on my ovaries," she said. "Only one tumor was cancerous," but that ovarian cancer had infected a lymph node that physicians could not completely cut out. The cancer had attached itself to a main artery to her left leg. On Jan. 4, still recovering in Lankenau Hospital in Lower Merion, she underwent a second surgery that cut a cancerous lump from her right breast.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ginger Coyle didn't know that when she tripped on a step leading to the stage during the national Hard Rock the House Talent Search, she would win. She beat out four other competitors from across the country to win a one-week scholarship to the Hard Rock Academy in Orlando, Fla.; a three-song recording demo deal with Hollywood Records; and a $5,000 Grammy gift bag that contained luggage, cosmetics, a portable CD player, and other goodies....
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2000 | By Charles Huckabee, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 17, Solomon Silber does all the things you'd expect a guitar-playing high school senior to do - form a rock band, write rap lyrics, think about going to college, or maybe putting that off for a while and seeking new experiences. Some new experiences he won't have to wait long for; the prize-winning classical guitarist will perform with the Newtown Chamber Orchestra this weekend and the Philadelphia Orchestra next month. Sunday and Monday, Silber will be soloist with the Newtown ensemble in the premiere of a concerto written by his teacher, composer/guitarist Allen Krantz.
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