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Gulag

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NEWS
June 6, 2005 | MICHELLE MALKIN
THE MAINSTREAM media and international human rights organizations have relentlessly portrayed the Guantanamo Bay detention facility as a depraved torture chamber operated by sadistic American military officials defiling Islam at every turn. It's the "gulag of our time," wails Amnesty International. It's the "anti-Statue of Liberty," bemoans New York Times columnist Tom Friedman. Have there been abuses? Yes. But here's the rest of the story, the part Islamists and their sympathizers don't want you to hear.
NEWS
June 10, 2005 | By Anne Applebaum
Anne Applebaum is a member of the Washington Post editorial board A few years ago, I spent several days reading through newsletters, pamphlets and other accounts of Soviet prison conditions published in the 1970s and '80s by Amnesty International. Sometimes these reports were remarkably detailed, testifying to the extraordinary ability of prisoners to smuggle out their stories. One included the memorable observation that on Sept. 13, 1979, the prisoner Zhukauskas "found a white worm" in his soup.
NEWS
July 23, 2011
Cardinal Kazimierz Swiatek, 96, the former leader of the Catholic Church in Belarus who survived a Soviet death sentence and nearly a decade in the Gulag, died Thursday in a hospital in Pinsk. Cardinal Swiatek was sentenced to death for spying in 1939 by Soviet authorities but escaped when Nazi Germany's forces occupied the city of Brest. After the Red Army regained control of Belarus in 1944, he was rearrested and served nine years in the brutal Gulag prison-camp system. He became archbishop of the Minsk Diocese in 1991, was named a cardinal in 1994, and headed the church in Belarus, which counts about 15 percent of the country as believers, until 2006.
NEWS
August 5, 2008
Gulag? What's that? Many Americans were asking that question in 1973 after publication outside the Soviet Union of dissident author Alexander Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago. Over time, Americans made the word gulag synonymous with prison, though gulag was actually a Russian acronym for Chief Administration of Corrective Labor Camps, the bureaucracy that once ran Soviet prisons for inmates such as Solzhenitsyn. His death Sunday at age 89 was a reminder of what the old Soviet Union was like and of how much modern Russia still needs to change.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
Rabbi Moshe Greenberg, 84, a religious educator who survived a brutal gulag in Siberia and secretly taught Judaism under an oppressive Soviet regime, has died in Israel. The Hasidic Chabad Lubavitch movement, of which Mr. Greenberg was a member, said he died Tuesday. Mr. Greenberg was born to a Hassidic family in Moldavia at a time when Jews were oppressed and Jewish practices were forbidden by the Soviets, Chabad said Thursday. At 14, he went to Tashkent in Uzbekistan to study Judaism at a secret Chabad seminary.
NEWS
January 2, 1986
The big advertisements for Yugo cars seem oblivious to the ethical problem of carrying on business as usual with Yugoslavia, a state that violates human rights on a large scale. There is only one political party, the Communist Party. There have never been free elections. Those who disagree with the government end up in the gulag. Recently, for example, nine high school students were sent to the gulag for three to eight years just for passing out leaflets asking for greater rights for the country's Albanian community.
NEWS
June 13, 2005
There's no gulag there Re: "Prison probe needed," letter, June 9: The writer criticized President Bush for calling a recent Amnesty International report "absurd. " The report alleges that the United States is maintaining a "gulag" at Guant?namo. A review of the facts indicates that Bush was justified. In The History of the Gulag: From Collectivization to the Great Terror, Oleg Khlevniuk describes the Stalinist gulags as camps where undesirables such as peasants, ethnic minorities and political and religious dissidents were gathered together, tortured and ultimately silenced.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | by Adam Hochschild, New York Times
Every field of history seems to have its revisionists. Some 15 years ago, for example, a school of German historians began claiming that Hitler in some ways wasn't quite so bad after all. Three historians in the American Historical Review have said far fewer people were arrested in the Great Soviet Purge of the late 1930s than had been previously thought. They claimed to have found records proving that nearly 400,000 prisoners had "escaped" from gulag camps, a claim that would draw laughter from any camp veteran alive today.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
When socialism is invoked in American political discourse, it's usually derisively. Prior to this election cycle, there hasn't been a self-described socialist with even remotely respectable polls in a presidential campaign since Eugene V. Debs. Since then, the term has been used mostly by conservatives as a slur or in poorly formulated broadsides equating America's public sector with the Gulag. But this year, the protest candidacy of democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is outperforming all expectations - he effectively tied Hillary Clinton in the Iowa caucuses last week and is favored to win Tuesday's New Hampshire primary - threatening to restore legitimacy to the term.
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NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Jake Blumgart
When socialism is invoked in American political discourse, it's usually derisively. Prior to this election cycle, there hasn't been a self-described socialist with even remotely respectable polls in a presidential campaign since Eugene V. Debs. Since then, the term has been used mostly by conservatives as a slur or in poorly formulated broadsides equating America's public sector with the Gulag. But this year, the protest candidacy of democratic socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is outperforming all expectations - he effectively tied Hillary Clinton in the Iowa caucuses last week and is favored to win Tuesday's New Hampshire primary - threatening to restore legitimacy to the term.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
Rabbi Moshe Greenberg, 84, a religious educator who survived a brutal gulag in Siberia and secretly taught Judaism under an oppressive Soviet regime, has died in Israel. The Hasidic Chabad Lubavitch movement, of which Mr. Greenberg was a member, said he died Tuesday. Mr. Greenberg was born to a Hassidic family in Moldavia at a time when Jews were oppressed and Jewish practices were forbidden by the Soviets, Chabad said Thursday. At 14, he went to Tashkent in Uzbekistan to study Judaism at a secret Chabad seminary.
NEWS
July 23, 2011
Cardinal Kazimierz Swiatek, 96, the former leader of the Catholic Church in Belarus who survived a Soviet death sentence and nearly a decade in the Gulag, died Thursday in a hospital in Pinsk. Cardinal Swiatek was sentenced to death for spying in 1939 by Soviet authorities but escaped when Nazi Germany's forces occupied the city of Brest. After the Red Army regained control of Belarus in 1944, he was rearrested and served nine years in the brutal Gulag prison-camp system. He became archbishop of the Minsk Diocese in 1991, was named a cardinal in 1994, and headed the church in Belarus, which counts about 15 percent of the country as believers, until 2006.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By PHIL GOLDSMITH
WITH TEACHERS unions getting slapped around across the country, leave it to Philadelphia School Superintendent Arlene Ackerman to show us why they're still necessary. She didn't set out to do that, but by trying to silence outspoken Audenried High School teacher Hope Moffett, she's made the case for the relevancy of unions far better than any of its leaders have done recently. Moffett, a three-year veteran at Audenried, had the audacity to criticize the district's plans to convert Audenried into a charter school.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Director Peter Weir, maker of such films as The Year of Living Dangerously , Witness , and The Truman Show , is one of film's master landscape artists. With the possible exception of Terence Malick, no one surpasses him in conveying the lure and awe of place and its transforming effects on people. In The Way Back , a breathtaking epic, Weir chronicles the two-year, 4,000-mile trek of prisoners who escape from a gulag in Siberia. They walk south to Mongolia, across the Gobi Desert, and the survivors then make it up into the Himalayas to find sanctuary in Tibet and India.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Exuberance alone will lend sparkle to a kids' movie. But it exhausts itself quickly, a cinematic syndrome confirmed by Shorts , the latest film from Robert ( Spy Kids ) Rodriguez. Shorts takes off like Usain Bolt but ends up bent over and panting, well short of the finish line. Our hero, Toe Thompson (Jimmy Bennett), is a dorky 11-year-old with heavy metal on what he describes as his "hillbilly teeth. " He may be the school bullies' plush doll, but, as he proves in the voice-over narration, Toe has a droll sense of humor.
NEWS
August 5, 2008
Gulag? What's that? Many Americans were asking that question in 1973 after publication outside the Soviet Union of dissident author Alexander Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago. Over time, Americans made the word gulag synonymous with prison, though gulag was actually a Russian acronym for Chief Administration of Corrective Labor Camps, the bureaucracy that once ran Soviet prisons for inmates such as Solzhenitsyn. His death Sunday at age 89 was a reminder of what the old Soviet Union was like and of how much modern Russia still needs to change.
NEWS
October 31, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Gulager is hot. The success of the first-time director's terrific monster film, Feast, which has made the top-three list of horror DVDs since its Oct. 17 release, has put the unknown squarely on Hollywood's short list of sought-after auteurs (well, the shorter list of directors who make gory, low-to-medium-budget horror films suffused with a sardonic sense of humor). Gulager explains Feast's success with characteristic self-deprecation: "My theory is that if you can actually finish a film you are so much . . . ahead.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
Save all wetlands Re: "Tiny turtle, colossal clout," June 5: The article was highly informative, but should have put more emphasis on the need for Pennsylvania to join several other states in requiring buffers for all wetlands, including but not limited to areas involving habitat for endangered or threatened species. Wetlands perform an array of very important functions, including filtering pollutants from runoff, storing floodwaters, and providing habitat for an array of wildlife, not just imperiled species.
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