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Gumbo

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FOOD
April 12, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Gumbos thickened with dark roux were rarely thought of as dishes for cooks in a hurry, because old methods of making the roux were time-consuming and tricky to pull off. But thanks to a new microwave technique for roux-making from Barbara Kafka's Microwave Gourmet (Morrow), the tastiest gumbos are quick and easy. So, "In a hurry" decided to incorporate this fast brown roux into an equally streamlined gumbo based on everyone's favorite shellfish, shrimp. The term gumbo is a catchall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When locals talk about gumbo, they're not always referring to the Louisiana stew laced with meat and veggies. They're talking about Philly Gumbo, the area's tastiest musical ragout of New Orleans parish-based soul, blues, reggae, and dense funk. After 31 years and running, they have finally made a CD, titled Come and Get It - but the fact is, adventurous listeners have made Philly Gumbo a topic of conversation for all of those 31 years, possibly a record when it comes to local bands.
FOOD
February 7, 2008 | By Sara Roahen FOR THE INQUIRER
In these northern environs, gumbo is a dish that many think of but once a year, as a marker of the pre-Lent celebration of Mardi Gras. But down in New Orleans, where gumbo is the most important dish in the Louisiana lexicon, most restaurants serve some version of it year round - at least once a week. At this time of year, two days post-Carnival, with strands of glittering beads, doubloons and plastic spears - parade throws all - already gathering dust, Lent has arrived in the largely Catholic city.
FOOD
February 4, 2010
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I've gotta love a Super Bowl with a culinary theme - I'm planning to make some of my best NOLA dishes this weekend (jambalaya, maybe a gumbo) . . . but can't do that without the proper smoked meats. I'm online ordering from Jacob's Andouille this year, chef John Besh's favorite. In the past, I've had good success with Best Stop in Lafayette, and Cajun Grocer, an excellent online source for all Louisiana products.
FOOD
February 14, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Carnival parades are rolling through New Orleans already, and the euphoria is surging toward Fat Tuesday. The momentum rises with every strutting brass band, every spectacular float that glides by, every glittering string of Mardi Gras beads that land in your outstretched hands like treasure from above. An afternoon of parade-going, though, can also stoke a fierce hunger. But there are few occasions when the city's lusty pageant of food is in such abundance. All along the parade routes on St. Charles and Carrollton Avenues, friends open their homes for parties, and their porches become perfumed with the pungent aroma of rustic Creole and Cajun pot cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1992 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fats Domino and 1,500 pounds of catfish. Dr. John and 115 gallons of steaming jambalaya. Shrimp, gumbo, crawfish. Let the good times roll. Philadelphia's Jambalaya Jam, the world's largest festival of New Orleans music outside of New Orleans, returns to the Delaware River waterfront this weekend with all the foot-stomping, body-shaking and stomach-stuffing that has made it a huge draw for the last six years. The festival, sponsored by USAir and run by the Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau, has become the grand announcement of summer in the city, three days of hot music, spicy food and endless fun to usher in the hot season.
NEWS
February 3, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The historic downtown strip of Medford, a quaint Victorian village on the fringes of the Pinelands, is about the last place I expected to encounter a "hey y'all!" bowl of Louisiana gumbo. But there it was the other night, steaming "ya-ya" style around a scoop of rice, with tender morsels of chicken bumping up against smoky moons of andouille sausage in a spice-tingled broth turned chestnut brown by patiently darkened roux. That it was served in a trendy square bowl is a small soul concession to the striving elegance of Ted's on Main, the year-and-a-half-old bistro where I was eating.
FOOD
September 24, 2009
Classic bouquet garni is a mixture of herbs tied with string or wrapped in cheesecloth to flavor soups and stews. This French import does the work for you and will make your fall soups sing. Wrapped in bay leaves, each bouquet contains chervil, oregano, thyme and marjoram. Crafty caramels Jennifer Bell was just out of college in Oregon and strapped for cash when she began making caramels by hand and giving them to relatives for the holidays. The reaction she got to these incredibly luscious treats inspired her to sell them by the pound, in 10 flavors as varied as cayenne, coconut, cashew, and, of course, chocolate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1993 | By Dan DeLuca, FOR THE INQUIRER
Jazzmatazz, Vol. 1, the first solo project by Guru, of the rap duo Gang Starr, is subtitled An Experimental Fusion of Hip-Hop and Jazz. Word to the Guru: Take it back to the lab. At Chestnut Cabaret on Wednesday night, the rhythmic rap quartet Gumbo opened the show. Gumbo's debut Dropping Soulful H2O on the Fiber was produced by Speech of Arrested Development, and, not surprisingly, the Milwaukee group traffics in an Afro-centric hip-hop that disses gangstas and preaches respect for women.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Mardis Gras revelry is at full force in Philadelphia this weekend, headquartered at Bacchanal at 1320 South St. Actually, this strange and funky little club is often cooking up New Orleans-style musical gumbo - soul cooking with a slab of bayou rock and Third World seasonings from Africa, Jamaica and Cuba. The presence of two occult/voodoo shops within howling distance of the club guarantees that Bacchanal performers are spreading the real thing on the crowd. But this holiday weekend, the club's really letting it all hang out, Hey La Bas!
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | Drew Lazor
BANANA bread. Gumbo. Hot browns. Shellfish. Rice. Citrus. No, this isn't a rundown of a culinarily gifted fraternity's refrigerator contents. It's just a few of the ingredients and dishes that have inspired intra-staff cooking duels at Sbraga, where chef-sanctioned battles keep the minds as sharp as the knives. Kevin Sbraga, who opened at Broad and Pine in late 2011, knows about creating on the fly. He won season seven of Bravo's "Top Chef" by adapting to every bizarre challenge thrown his way, from developing a plate inspired by the phrase "bring home the bacon" to crafting a dish that could be eaten by astronauts in zero gravity (seriously)
FOOD
February 23, 2012 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
My husband always talks longingly about his Aunt Helen Rose's Chicken Gumbo. I mentioned to her that I wished I could make her famous dish, but it takes too long, so she sent me this quick version, which my husband loves. Use fresh okra if you can, for texture. And since the dish improves with age, make extra to freeze for another quick dinner.   Aunt Helen Rose's Chicken Gumbo Makes two servings Vegetable oil spray 3/4 pound skinless chicken breast with bones, cut into several pieces 1/4 pound okra, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012 | By Stacey Plaisance, Associated Press
NEW ORLEANS - Alligator hunters, raccoon wranglers, and crawfish catchers in Louisiana's critter-filled swamps and bayous are increasingly common on television. Since the introduction of the History Channel's wildly popular Swamp People in 2010, roughly a dozen other Louisiana-based reality shows have made their television debuts, among them the Travel Channel's Girls, Guns and Gators , CMT's Crawfish Cowboys , and the Discovery Channel's Ragin' Cajuns . The reason for the boom in Louisiana-based reality TV is twofold, said the state's lieutenant governor, Jay Dardenne.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2011 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
When locals talk about gumbo, they're not always referring to the Louisiana stew laced with meat and veggies. They're talking about Philly Gumbo, the area's tastiest musical ragout of New Orleans parish-based soul, blues, reggae, and dense funk. After 31 years and running, they have finally made a CD, titled Come and Get It - but the fact is, adventurous listeners have made Philly Gumbo a topic of conversation for all of those 31 years, possibly a record when it comes to local bands.
FOOD
February 4, 2010
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I've gotta love a Super Bowl with a culinary theme - I'm planning to make some of my best NOLA dishes this weekend (jambalaya, maybe a gumbo) . . . but can't do that without the proper smoked meats. I'm online ordering from Jacob's Andouille this year, chef John Besh's favorite. In the past, I've had good success with Best Stop in Lafayette, and Cajun Grocer, an excellent online source for all Louisiana products.
FOOD
September 24, 2009
Classic bouquet garni is a mixture of herbs tied with string or wrapped in cheesecloth to flavor soups and stews. This French import does the work for you and will make your fall soups sing. Wrapped in bay leaves, each bouquet contains chervil, oregano, thyme and marjoram. Crafty caramels Jennifer Bell was just out of college in Oregon and strapped for cash when she began making caramels by hand and giving them to relatives for the holidays. The reaction she got to these incredibly luscious treats inspired her to sell them by the pound, in 10 flavors as varied as cayenne, coconut, cashew, and, of course, chocolate.
SPORTS
February 23, 2009 | By Jim Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The competition for the Phillies' fifth starting pitcher's job is a little like a bowl of seafood gumbo down the road at Frenchy's Caf? on the beach. It has a little bit of everything in it. You want experience? There's Chan Ho Park, a veteran of 280 big-league starts. You want someone with something to prove? There's Kyle Kendrick, who is trying to regain the job after losing it last season. You want a lefthander? There's J.A. Happ, who showed his potential by recording a 2.28 ERA in four starts last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It's a pity the Geneva Conventions haven't been invoked to end the cruel abuses regularly inflicted on Cajun and Creole cuisine hereabouts - horrible bread suffocating the po'boy, gumbos salty beyond belief, gummy rice, unrecognizable jambalaya, odd olive salads that insult the great state of Louisiana. I have taken to squirming and averting my eyes upon encountering Cajun-themed eateries, unleashed by the blackened-redfish craze of the 1980s, still popping up now and then, often in the worst of all possible hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2008 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
WITH THE HEAT index more than 100 this week, it seemed like an ideal time to try out Les Bons Temps, the 6-week-old Center City version of Carmine's Creole Caf? on the Main Line. In the new location executive chef and owner John Mims and his business partner, Howard Taylor, are branching out with a contemporary interpretation of Mim's native New Orleans cuisine. The old H. Battles building lends itself to a rich southern decor. The sweeping staircase, which surely must be Mount Kilimanjaro to the waitstaff by mid-shift, provides a decadent and indulgent grandeur.
FOOD
February 7, 2008 | By Sara Roahen FOR THE INQUIRER
In these northern environs, gumbo is a dish that many think of but once a year, as a marker of the pre-Lent celebration of Mardi Gras. But down in New Orleans, where gumbo is the most important dish in the Louisiana lexicon, most restaurants serve some version of it year round - at least once a week. At this time of year, two days post-Carnival, with strands of glittering beads, doubloons and plastic spears - parade throws all - already gathering dust, Lent has arrived in the largely Catholic city.
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