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Gun Safety

NEWS
June 22, 2004 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lower Gwynedd Police Officer Dan Diedel vowed that he would be even more cautious with guns than usual when his daughter, Jamie, arrived 15 months ago. "At some point, the vision popped into my head of my little girl dead," Diedel said, his voice faltering. "It's amazing how your perspective changes. " To help other families keep firearms secure, Diedel is giving out free cable gun locks and training township residents to use them. The first session was June 11, and he will offer a second class in the fall.
NEWS
March 4, 2004
There's a climactic Vietnam battle scene in the true-to-life best-seller We Were Soldiers Once ... and Young where U.S. soldiers order artillery gunners to shell their own position because it's being overrun by the enemy. U.S. Sen. Larry E. Craig (R., Idaho) must know that feeling of desperation: On Tuesday, he commanded his GOP Senate allies to rain down "no" votes on his own prized but misguided legislation - the gun-industry immunity bill. Craig wasn't besieged by any enemy, though.
NEWS
January 20, 2004
Wouldn't it be great, for a change, to deal in the realm of the possible on the divisive, hot-button issue of firearms safety? Usually, this issue produces a showdown at the OK Corral: Gun-rights advocates squared off against handgun-ban folks, snarling all around, and may the most hardball politics win. In fact, it often seems that maneuvering for political advantage in the next election is the real gun-control agenda of both parties, rather...
NEWS
April 26, 2003 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James Sheets was a gangly eighth grader with a fondness for cowboy boots who moved easily between cliques, socializing with jocks and skateboarders. His jokes had the girls giggling. Eugene Segro, the principal at Sheets' school, was a button-down type who always wore a suit but could be playful. He was tough but fair, someone who could turn bad students around, and didn't mind it when students joked about his bald pate by calling him not "Mr. Segro" but rather "Mr. See-No-Hair-Grow.
NEWS
February 14, 2003
It's been a few years since Pennsylvanians first told pollsters they supported a modest tightening of the rules for handgun sales - by a slam-dunk margin of more than two to one. Even so, that hasn't moved the needle among Harrisburg lawmakers. Now, though, citizens have reason to hope lawmakers will notice: Finally, they have a governor who agrees with them on this life-and-death gun safety initiative. There's also surprising new evidence from the firearms industry itself on the need to act. A former lobbyist has gone public with what he charges is the dirty secret that gun makers long have recognized: Some gun dealers knowingly sell to illegal gun traffickers.
NEWS
November 27, 2002
'Smart gun' bill a ban in disguise Your editorial regarding a bill pending before the Assembly advocating "smart gun" technology ("Ready, aim, vote 'yes,' " Nov. 18) was as flawed as the legislation. Your nine-paragraph editorial used the word children (or variations of the word) nine times. This is often a technique used to inject emotion whenever an issue lacks merit. For example, you mentioned a "12-year-old son" of a Philadelphia police officer who was fatally shot with the officer's revolver.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Picture a handgun that knows the feel of its owner so intimately it won't let anyone else pull the trigger. New Jersey is homing in on legislating this image of a personalized handgun - a concept likely years away from going from lab research to the handgun stashed in someone's nightstand. The state would be the first to require this "smart gun" technology on gun purchases after it becomes commercially available. An Assembly committee is scheduled to take up the bill today in a hearing that could determine whether the state will pioneer a new period in gun-control laws.
NEWS
July 3, 2002 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A well-dressed robber armed with a rifle escaped with an estimated $4,000 from a bank branch near the Liberty Bell yesterday, disappearing into a crowd of tourists and pedestrians near the Bourse building, authorities said. Clem Cizewski, 49, was one of the customers in line about 1:45 p.m. at the PNC branch on the southwest corner of Fourth and Market Streets. More than a half-dozen customers waited for two tellers. "It happened so fast, I thought it was a toy at first," said Cizewski, describing the small-caliber rifle.
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