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Gustav Mahler

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1999 | By Anne Midgette, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tonight, the Academy of Music is hosting an unusual reunion. No, not between conductor Riccardo Chailly and the Philadelphia Orchestra. The 46-year-old Italian, well out of the blocks in the race for the Philadelphians' music director post, is only too happy to return to an orchestra he says he "loves with a great deal of passion. " The reunion is between Gustav Mahler and Edgard Varese. These two composers seem unlikely bedfellows at best. Mahler is the quintessential late Romantic, known for large-scale symphonies that call for massive instrumental forces, testing the limits of the conventional orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Alma Mahler (Sarah Wynter) wears a stunning red gown at the beginning of Bride of the Wind. By the end - some 17 years later in this very pretty, very shallow biopic - she's wearing a stunning blue gown. In between, the famed dame of early-20th-century Vienna marries composer Gustav Mahler, seduces painter Oskar Kokoschka, beguiles architect Walter Gropius and novelist Franz Werfel, befriends the artist Gustav Klimt, and gives birth to several children. But the woman who was muse, mother, and a musician in her own right remains no more than a striking beauty with a couple of drop-dead dresses.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2001 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
IN ITS FINAL week in the PNC Concert Series at the Mann, the Philadelphia Orchestra is offering a Broadway evening, Finnish greats, and a mighty closing concert before heading to Saratoga, N.Y. Tonight One of America's finest singers, soprano Dawn Upshaw, will lavish her gorgeous voice on Broadway music favoritesby Copland, Bernstein, Sondheim, the Gershwins ("Someone To Watch Over Me") and more. David Alan Miller conducts this season must. Wednesday One of the orchestra's regular guests, Spanish conductor Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos, takes the podium for the final two concerts.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The mark of a good Carl Nielsen performance is an experience fraught with paradox: The more you take it in, the less you understand it. Therefore, saying that Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 was hearteningly enigmatic at Monday's Kimmel Center performance by the Curtis Symphony Orchestra means it may be one of the best readings of the piece you'll ever hear. Conducted by Alan Gilbert (the New York Philharmonic director-designate and a Curtis alumnus), the orchestra played with all of its strengths at full throttle - meticulous control at softer volumes, wall-of-sound fortissimos and the willingness to realize what the conductor wants, unfiltered by some eternal institutional history (being students, they don't have one)
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Based in the high-traffic musical world of London, conductor Vladimir Jurowski has the freedom to devise unconventional programs that can be heard as provocative studies in musical incongruity. What might J.S. Bach have in common with Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss? Besides the obvious fact that Bach is pretty much the basis of everything after 1750? Such was the program Jurowski conducted with the Philadelphia Orchestra on Friday afternoon, which was, typical of him, played with an ultra-clear-eyed vision but, in this case, left you scratching your head.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The mythology of Gustav Mahler is still in a state of evolution, and that has a lot to do with how his Symphony No. 6 is heard and played. Though the symphony has long been a specialty of Christoph Eschenbach, he conducted it for the first time with the Philadelphia Orchestra on Thursday at the Kimmel Center, and not in ways I would have expected. The old view of Mahler has him haunted with boyhood aspirations to become a martyr and, later on, composing gargantuan symphonies as if being seized in a scruff-of-the-neck creative frenzy that ended only after many long movements requiring hundreds of performers were finished.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The Al in Gus and Al is a playwright named Albert Innaurato. He is fat and 40 and from South Philly, and he is going through a traumatic midlife crisis, which is caused by the fact that his plays keep getting panned. The resemblance to the real Albert Innaurato is, in a word, inescapable. The play is so personal that you hate to look, although Innaurato does his level best to make it fun. It has been mounted in the 75-seat studio theater at Off-Broadway's prestigious Playwrights Horizons.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
After the Philadelphia Orchestra's Broadway-based sellout concert tonight led by Rob Fisher, the focus shifts into a much deeper world. Its four-concert "Late Great Works Festival" explores the passion of seven great composers in the final months - sometimes days - of their turbulent and often tragic lives. Some of these works are virtual signatures of their creator's souls, as these masters pondered the mysteries of life through their musical language. Led by Christoph Eschenbach, the festival begins Thursday with the last completed symphony by Gustav Mahler, his Ninth.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Novelist Somerset Maugham once had a character say that whenever he observed a grieving woman, he detected an element of insincerity to the genuine pain. This female reviewer pardons the sexist remark in order to explain similar feelings about Gustav Mahler. The man loves his suffering so much, the music strikes one as having a layer of insincerity to it. This is not to diminish the composer's gargantuan gifts - and gift for the gargantuan - which the Philadelphia Orchestra put on display yesterday afternoon at the Academy of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Mozart and Mahler were the offerings of James DePreist and the Philadelphia Orchestra Thursday at the Academy of Music - well, not exactly Mahler. At his death Mahler left two of the five movements of the Symphony No. 10 in nearly full score, and the rest of the composition in varying states of completion. This performance version was completed in 1976 by English musicologist Deryck Cooke. There is no question, Cooke wrote in his estimable handbook Gustav Mahler: An Introduction to His Music (Cambridge University Press)
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NEWS
March 7, 2016
Vincent Fraley is communications manager for the Historical Society of Pennsylvania As the Philadelphia Orchestra tunes up for this week's performances of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 8 , consider the story of the man who introduced the orchestra to the world: Leopold Stokowski. Born in London to a Polish carpenter father and an Irish mother, Stokowski (1882-1977) studied at Britain's Royal College of Music and Queen's College, Oxford, before working as an organist and choirmaster.
NEWS
February 9, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Based in the high-traffic musical world of London, conductor Vladimir Jurowski has the freedom to devise unconventional programs that can be heard as provocative studies in musical incongruity. What might J.S. Bach have in common with Gustav Mahler and Richard Strauss? Besides the obvious fact that Bach is pretty much the basis of everything after 1750? Such was the program Jurowski conducted with the Philadelphia Orchestra on Friday afternoon, which was, typical of him, played with an ultra-clear-eyed vision but, in this case, left you scratching your head.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
By Caeli Smith I often ride the subway with my violin, and the sight of the instrument's case slung over my shoulder as I squeeze into a crowded compartment tends to spark comments from strangers. "Oh, I played violin for four years in elementary school!" As they reminisce, I begin to understand that they no longer have a relationship with classical music; it's all in the past for them. These conversations, although pleasant, leave me disturbed. If so many people studied classical music as children, why don't they take pleasure in it later in life?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pianist Garrick Ohlsson hasn't always worn the mileage of his four-decade career lightly: His fingers are almost always in fine shape, but he sometimes leaves his heart in San Francisco (which is his home). The all-Liszt recital he chose for himself Thursday at the Kimmel Center, however, had few places to hide, showing the 64-year-old artist at his peak on all levels. After Liszt's 200th birthday in 2011, so many performances of the composer's Piano Sonata in B minor have gone under the bridge that only Pierre Laurent Aimard's recording is one I'd want to hear again.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Whether or not there's a free lunch in America, free Mahler is all over the place these days. Though the posthumous popularity of the early-20th-century symphonist Gustav Mahler seemed to be peaking 10 years ago, recognition of his music is, if anything, accelerating in this, the centenary of his death. Those who have never investigated Medici TV ( www.medici.tv ) are more likely to do so now that the online video-streaming network is offering a Mahler symphony cycle free to the end of June, showing the Orchestre de Paris under Christoph Eschenbach in thrilling form.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Gustav Mahler is invited to rant from beyond the grave. Among the five new pieces being premiered by Dolce Suono Ensemble on Wednesday as part of its Mahler 100/Schoenberg 60 Project, one of Mahler's letters is being set to music by Princeton-based composer Steve Mackey. Titled "Herr Guttmann," the piece has opera bass Eric Owens as the voice of Mahler threatening to walk out on the premiere of his own Symphony No. 8 for lack of rehearsals. Herr Guttmann, the impresario, believes the chorus' enthusiasm will get it through.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The mark of a good Carl Nielsen performance is an experience fraught with paradox: The more you take it in, the less you understand it. Therefore, saying that Nielsen's Symphony No. 3 was hearteningly enigmatic at Monday's Kimmel Center performance by the Curtis Symphony Orchestra means it may be one of the best readings of the piece you'll ever hear. Conducted by Alan Gilbert (the New York Philharmonic director-designate and a Curtis alumnus), the orchestra played with all of its strengths at full throttle - meticulous control at softer volumes, wall-of-sound fortissimos and the willingness to realize what the conductor wants, unfiltered by some eternal institutional history (being students, they don't have one)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The mythology of Gustav Mahler is still in a state of evolution, and that has a lot to do with how his Symphony No. 6 is heard and played. Though the symphony has long been a specialty of Christoph Eschenbach, he conducted it for the first time with the Philadelphia Orchestra on Thursday at the Kimmel Center, and not in ways I would have expected. The old view of Mahler has him haunted with boyhood aspirations to become a martyr and, later on, composing gargantuan symphonies as if being seized in a scruff-of-the-neck creative frenzy that ended only after many long movements requiring hundreds of performers were finished.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
After the Philadelphia Orchestra's Broadway-based sellout concert tonight led by Rob Fisher, the focus shifts into a much deeper world. Its four-concert "Late Great Works Festival" explores the passion of seven great composers in the final months - sometimes days - of their turbulent and often tragic lives. Some of these works are virtual signatures of their creator's souls, as these masters pondered the mysteries of life through their musical language. Led by Christoph Eschenbach, the festival begins Thursday with the last completed symphony by Gustav Mahler, his Ninth.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2004 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
The Philadelphia Orchestra's four-week festival of Gustav Mahler's world began last weekend with Christoph Eschenbach leading the immense, 110-minute Third Symphony. After Saturday's performance, he strode to the piano and joined mezzo Lorraine Hunt Lieberson in six songs by Mozart, Schumann and Brahms, exciting an enthusiastic audience that filled the downstairs at Verizon Hall until nearly 11 p.m. "After that symphony, we couldn't sleep anyway," Eschenbach admitted. There's not one note of Mahler in this weekend's program, but his influence is ever-present.
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