FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 8, 2003
WE salute Mary Carey, the self-professed porn actress who's making a run for the Governor's Mansion in California. She symbolizes, we feel, how completely wacky the recall effort aimed against Gov. Gray Davis has become. Consider this, in a field that is getting crowded with the likes of Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gary "Diff'rent Strokes" Coleman, Davis could get 40 percent of the vote in the recall election and lose and a Republican candidate, who only attracts 10 percent of the vote, can end up winning the office.
NEWS
March 30, 2004
OUR FIRST thought on reading about the Governor Rendell speedwagon in yesterday's Daily News was that it could be worse: the guv could be speeding and talking on the cell phone and eating, like so many drivers out there who make driving so dangerous. Instead, Eddie's not only got a driver doing the speeding for him, from the photos we've seen, he doesn't even appear to be on a cell phone, but a regular phone. Granted, that's not to condone Rendell's speed racer behavior. For one thing, there's the obvious potential danger, not only to other drivers, but to the governor.
NEWS
April 29, 1987
Gov. Casey comes to town today to take a look around St. Christopher's Hospital. That's very nice. It should be an enjoyable visit. There's this one problem, though. Casey's looking around because the hospital could lose a $23.8 million state grant. Without the state grant, another $14.8 million in federal matching funds and $30 million in private donations will disappear. You don't have to have a Ph.D. in mathematics to see that loss of all that money would make St. Christopher's new $72 million hospital an impossibility.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
I commend Gov. Rendell's declaration making Sept. 27 "Family Day," and his encouragement that parents talk to their children about drug and alcohol abuse. I'd like to offer a suggestion. Given the direction he is taking Pennsylvania, he might want to encourage parents to speak to their children about gambling addiction, too. As the fastest growing addiction among teens, and one not as easily detected as substance abuse (no slurred speech or dilated pupils), parent will need to speak clearly and firmly about the dangers posed from slot machines and other gambling.
NEWS
March 5, 2003
I AM UPSET about the health benefits of the retirees from Bethlehem Steel, which filed Chapter 11 and sold its assets to ISG of Cleveland. They are losing their benefits on March 31. What are these men and women suppose to do? This is affects my mother's health insurance. She's a widow and has my dad's coverage. He worked 29 years and gave his life for his benefits. My mother takes 40 medications daily, plus weekly shots that cost $100 each. She also needs blood transfusions. I hope the governor pays as much attention to this as he did to attending the Groundhog Day festivities in Punxsutawney.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
So, what do we get for governor? Tom Ridge is 6-feet-3 and 205 pounds. He's a guy from Erie who grew up kind of poor, won an academic ride through Harvard and fought in 'Nam as an Army sergeant. He received a law degree at Dickinson, married his longtime heartthrob on the rebound (her second marriage) and adopted two kids: boy, girl. He often wears a hearing aid, the result of a childhood infection. He dyes his hair to look younger than 49. Why? "I just touch it up," he says, "I just do. " He's a Republican who cozied up to Mayor Rendell, who likes the mayor and who might be a little more receptive to pleas from the city than most GOPers.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
A PICTURE is worth a thousand words. That should make the March 29 front page ("Too Fast Eddie") worth a small fortune. Either my old eyes are deceiving me, or Fast Eddie Rendell AND his State Police driver have failed to fasten their seat belts! William Palmer Philadelphia Condi on the spot Condoleezza Rice says that only "law" and "precedent" keep her from testifying publicly to the 9/11 Commission. At least one real reason is her ridiculous assertion a while ago - after ex-Rep.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | By JOHN M. BAER, Daily News Staff Writer
Gov. Casey has sent a message to Senate Republicans that he's willing to compromise on stalled state budget matters. The vehicle he used was the Republican-passed $1.5 billion Pennsylvania Department of Transportation budget. The budget, which Casey signed during a news conference last night, keeps the department working and pays PennDOT workers, some of whom haven't gotten paychecks since July 1. Casey called the signing "a breakthrough . . . a very strong signal of our continuing willingness to compromise" on the state budget impasse.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
Here's a hoagie recipe dedicated to Fast Eddie, our former mayor and future governor. Back in the summer of '99, the folks at Wawa introduced the Rendelli, a spicy sub they named after the guy they called the "number one hoagie fan in Philadelphia. " The Rendelli lasted only a few weeks on the menu board, but while it was around it sure was a hit. Like all of Wawa's sandwiches, this one was available in Junior, Shorti or Classic size. The recipe here makes a Shorti (six-inch sub)
NEWS
April 11, 2008
INSTEAD OF sending our troops over to Iraq and Afghanistan to protect those countries for whatever reasons, how about if Gov. Rendell, the former mayor, starts to use some of the troops from the 28th Infantry Division (the "Bloody Bucket" Division of the World War I and II fame) to patrol the subway concourses and protect the citizens of Philadelphia from being killed, beaten and robbed by thugs who are using the subway for their own "needs and satisfactions. " Bobby Eddis, of the Philadelphia FOP, hit the nail on the head when he said they ought to have the "Granny Squads" back in the Philadelphia Police Department.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 31, 2015
LET'S CONSIDER the complex case of one Marcus Brown. It involves apparel, yard signs, social media, politics and race. It's a stunning example of narrow-minded self interest vs. sane public policy. In January, Brown was nominated by Gov. Wolf to head the Pennsylvania State Police after heading the Maryland State Police. A principal reason he was picked, according to Wolf at the time, was his "recruiting in areas with high minority populations and historically black colleges.
NEWS
February 25, 2015
ON BEHALF of Planned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania, I congratulate Gov. Wolf for his recent announcement that Pennsylvania will move away from the Healthy PA plan to a much more comprehensive full expansion of Medicaid. The federal money has already been set aside to expand preventive and lifesaving health care to hardworking women and their families in our state, and we finally have a governor willing to implement this program. The expansion will be 100 percent financed with federal money through 2016, and by at least 90 percent in 2017 and thereafter.
NEWS
November 6, 2014
FOR TOM WOLF the easy part is over. His money, demeanor and running against America's most vulnerable incumbent yesterday combined to make him governor-elect. And in a way that made history: He's the first candidate to break a 68-year state cycle of electing governors of different parties every eight years. It's a cycle that extended way back before we allowed governors two terms. But now what? Now Wolf, a progressive Democratic newcomer, faces governing the least-progressive Northeastern state, known for its love of the status quo. He faces doing so with a Legislature controlled by Republican majorities that couldn't get along with the Republican governor Wolf just beat.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Pennsylvania's Tom Corbett has been described as "endangered" so often in the past couple of years, it could be mistaken for his first name. Long saddled with low approval ratings in statewide opinion polls, the Republican governor trails by double digits in his fight for a second term. For all his troubles, it turns out that Corbett has plenty of company in misery this year: 11 governors of both parties are in tight reelection races, and analysts foresee the roughest ride for incumbent chief executives since at least 1994, when six lost their jobs.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
DESPITE VIDEO evidence of Gov. Corbett's former son-in-law taking $140 in marked money during a 2013 FBI and Police Department sting operation, a Philadelphia jury yesterday failed to reach a unanimous verdict. Common Pleas Judge Diana L. Anhalt declared a mistrial after the jury indicated it was hopelessly deadlocked on all seven charges faced by fired narcotics officer Gerold Gibson, 44. The jury of nine women and three men began deliberating yesterday morning and worked for five hours before being released by Anhalt.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's new fiscal year started yesterday with an election-year budget bill approved in a rigidly partisan vote by the Republican-controlled Legislature, but not Gov. Corbett's signature or a clear picture of what he planned to do with it. The Republican governor, who used to boast about his perfect record in signing budgets on time, said early yesterday that he would not immediately sign the $29.1 billion spending plan that lawmakers...
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE NOVEMBER election for governor will give Pennsylvania voters a real choice. They can elect the man with a lot of money. Or they can elect the man who's very popular with other rich people. The 2014 contest between newly minted Democratic nominee Tom Wolf - a once-obscure businessman who used $10 million of his own money to buy instant name ID - and GOP incumbent Gov. Corbett, who's adept at wooing big-ticket donations from energy executives and other business leaders, is already the exclamation point on that "big money is way too big in Pennsylvania" politics.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
THE PRIMARY for governor that ends tomorrow has been a mix of what we're used to and what we're not. It suggests evidence of political change, yet underscores political truisms. The first truism, of course, is money matters. Tom Wolf's $10 million put him where he stands today, which is poised to win the four-way Democratic race. But like other self-evident truths, this one carries a caveat: Money alone doesn't always do it. The National Institute on Money in State Politics has a decade's worth of data showing that among more than 6,000 self-funding candidates, only 11 percent won the offices they sought.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
WITH TOM WOLF firmly in control of Tuesday's Democratic primary election for governor, we have to wait and see who is likely to share his ticket in November. That's right, we're talking about the race for lieutenant governor, that one-heartbeat-away post with the principal task of overseeing the state Senate. Haven't been paying attention? Don't feel bad. You're not alone. Two Democrats - state Sen. Mike Stack III of Philadelphia and former U.S. Rep. Mark Critz of Johnstown - are neck-and-neck front-runners in two polls this week on the five-man field.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
THE WORDING was polite but the message was clear. U.S. Sen. Bob Casey wrote Gov. Corbett last week urging him to give up trying to implement the state's Voter ID Law. This dog of a law, first passed in 2012, has never fully taken effect, mostly due to court challenges to its strict requirements that voters show a photo ID before being allowed to vote. In January, Commonwealth Judge Bernard McGinley ruled the law unconstitutional, saying that it could deny the right to vote to several hundred thousand Pennsylvania who did not have access to the approved IDs. The state asked McGinley to reconsider his decision.
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