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Guyana

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NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Bert Wilkinson, Associated Press
GEORGETOWN, Guyana - Flight 523 from New York had just touched down and passengers were applauding the pilot's landing in the South American country Saturday when something suddenly went wrong. The Boeing 737-800 slid off the end of a rainy runway, crashed through a chain-link fence, and broke in half just short of a deep ravine. All 163 people aboard survived. Officials were starting to probe the crash even as they marveled at the lack of fatalities. "We must be the luckiest country and luckiest set of people in the world to escape so lightly," said Health Minister Leslie Ramsammy, who said more than 30 people were taken to the hospital.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Bert Wilkinson, Associated Press
GEORGETOWN, Guyana - The airport where a Caribbean Airlines jet skidded off a rain-slicked runway in Guyana and broke apart was upgrading systems that help pilots to land, but not all the systems were operating yet at the time of the crash, Guyana's top aviation official said Sunday. Officials and aviation experts cautioned that it was too early to say whether the lack of the systems was a factor in the crash that injured about 30 people but killed none. The Boeing 737-800 with 162 people on board slid off the end of the runway and stopped just short of a deep ravine near the South American country's capital.
SPORTS
May 14, 1997 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
To Kwesi Solomon's way of thinking, any kid can grow up in America and become president of Guyana. Especially him. After Solomon, a 6-3, 270-pound defensive tackle at George Washington High, is finished playing in the 23rd annual Daily News-Eagles City All-Star Football Game, 7 p.m. Saturday at Northeast High, and after he's finished playing football at Villanova and earning a business degree, he might remain in this country, apply for...
NEWS
April 16, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 8-month-old boy lay in his Philadelphia hospital bed one day last week, peaceful, his grandmother dripping food into a stomach tube hanging from lines tied to the bedposts. This is how the child will have to be fed back in his own country, because no one there can service an automatic feeding pump. Yesterday, a successful 12-week sojourn to repair Zachariah Garib's pancreas and save his life ended when Zachariah returned to his village in Guyana, on the northeastern coast of South America.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By David McFadden, Associated Press
KINGSTON, Jamaica - The lushly forested nation of Guyana last month joined a regional pact to protect jaguars, the elusive spotted cat that is the biggest land predator in the Americas but is vulnerable due to expanded agriculture and mining that carves away at its fragmented habitat. Leaders of the government's environment ministry were signing an agreement with the New York-based conservation group Panthera, which is trying to establish a "jaguar corridor," a network of pathways that would link core jaguar populations from northern Argentina to Mexico.
NEWS
May 26, 2009 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Standing in front of his karate class in West Philadelphia, the gentle grandfather turned warrior as he barked crisp commands. "Open your mind to your opponent!" ordered Teruyuki Okazaki, his posture as erect as the slender gold staffs of large American and Japanese flags flanking him. For 48 years, legions of acolytes from around the world have studied at his spartan gym at 45th and Locust Streets, absorbing the lessons of Okazaki, the highest-ranking Shotokan karate master in the world.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
It was an inner voice that told Miguel Martinez, 15, that it was OK to kill Anthony Williams on March 15. Martinez said in a statement to police that he had some doubts as he was riding in a car with the doomed 13-year-old boy to the scene. "I was in the car thinking, 'Should I do it or not?' " Martinez said in the statement. "Something told me, 'Go ahead and do it.' " When they reached a secluded area in Fairmount Park, Martinez said, one of his partners "turned him around so Anthony's back was to me. I stood two steps behind him and shot him in the back of the head.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2009 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the day she graduated from law school in the spring of 2008, as the great ship of the global economy began to list and take on water, it would have been easy for Lindi von Mutius to throw up her hands in despair. True, she soon managed to land a job in Philadelphia with a small real estate law firm. But the firm's finances quickly went south, lawyers began to jump ship, and paychecks started to bounce. Recruiters, as recruiters often are, were cheery and buoyant and promised the moon, but time after time the jobs and engagements they promised evaporated as the big law firms cut back.
NEWS
December 20, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Archibald Parkinson, 88, of Germantown, a Lutheran chaplain for prisons, mental hospitals and churches, died of a stroke Thursday at Pennsylvania Hospital. Rev. Parkinson was born in New Amsterdam, Guyana. After graduating from high school, he learned accounting through correspondence courses from England and worked as an accountant in Georgetown, Guyana. He joined a Lutheran church, where he became a lay pastor. With dreams of becoming a minister, the young man traveled from South America to Oxford, Chester County, where he earned a bachelor's degree in classical languages at Lincoln University.
SPORTS
March 27, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Chicago White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf leveled another attack at Donald Fehr, comparing the union head to cult leader Jim Jones. In his first visit to White Sox training camp in the replacement era, Reinsdorf on Saturday criticized striking players for "blindly" following Fehr in the seven-month labor dispute, as Jones's followers did during the 1978 Jonestown massacre. Reinsdorf said the players should hire someone from the outside to "review the negotiations - what the clubs have offered, what the union has offered.
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BUSINESS
December 21, 2015
Talk about a deodorant-don't-fail-me-now moment. Jess Edelstein and Sarah Ribner, buddies since their days at Friends' Central, were on the set of ABC's Shark Tank in September to make a business pitch to a lineup of entrepreneurial big shots. They were seeking $50,000 to help elevate a business the twentysomethings launched in March 2014, PiperWai L.L.C. Should the pressure and studio lights get to them, they were ready, fortified with their own PiperWai natural deodorant.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the dot.com boom crashed in 2001 and the easy money dried up, Guyana native Jonathan Brassington and two colleagues quit their venture capital-backed Philadelphia firm and set up their own small company: LiquidHub. They designed it to be self-funding - with cash from clients, not bets from investors - and went to work upgrading Internet services for some of the region's biggest companies. Today, LiquidHub is big enough, profitable enough, and growing fast enough to welcome investment from around the world.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
SO, a Trinidadian auto specialist and a Guyanese-Muslim business strategist walk into a combination restaurant, grocery and carpet-installation center in Delco . . . That sounds like the setup to the most convoluted crack in comedic history, but it's not a joke - it's the seed that sprouted Bad Habit, a distinctive Caribbean restaurant in diverse Upper Darby. Exploring the cuisine of the islands through American-influenced street food and a halal-friendly approach, owners Sheldon Crosbie and Zahid Khan are addressing a void many don't even realize demands filling.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By David McFadden, Associated Press
KINGSTON, Jamaica - The lushly forested nation of Guyana last month joined a regional pact to protect jaguars, the elusive spotted cat that is the biggest land predator in the Americas but is vulnerable due to expanded agriculture and mining that carves away at its fragmented habitat. Leaders of the government's environment ministry were signing an agreement with the New York-based conservation group Panthera, which is trying to establish a "jaguar corridor," a network of pathways that would link core jaguar populations from northern Argentina to Mexico.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
Carlton Nathaniel King, 70, a security officer at the Wistar Institute and a retired Philadelphia Gas Works employee, died Friday, Nov. 2, after a 11/2-year bout with prostate cancer. Mr. King was born in Guyana and married his wife, Sylvia, in 1971. The couple had two children before immigrating to the United States in 1987. He lived in Olney. Mr. King was described by his daughter, Diane White, as a proud man who wouldn't let anything get in his way. White said doctors told him he was persistent even in the face of cancer.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
Scientists back restarting reactors June 11 (Bloomberg) - A panel of Japanese scientists reported that two nuclear reactors idled for safety checks were safe to operate, giving Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda the approval he needs to restart the units. In a meeting late Sunday that was moved to a new venue after antinuclear protests, the 12-member panel appointed by the governor of Fukui prefecture, where Kansai Electric Power Co.'s Ohi nuclear plant is located, ruled the plant can be operated safely, according to national broadcaster NHK. Noda, backed by businesses including Komatsu Ltd. and NEC Corp., said June 8 the nation needed to resume nuclear power generation to avoid blackouts and preserve quality of life.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Bert Wilkinson, Associated Press
GEORGETOWN, Guyana - The airport where a Caribbean Airlines jet skidded off a rain-slicked runway in Guyana and broke apart was upgrading systems that help pilots to land, but not all the systems were operating yet at the time of the crash, Guyana's top aviation official said Sunday. Officials and aviation experts cautioned that it was too early to say whether the lack of the systems was a factor in the crash that injured about 30 people but killed none. The Boeing 737-800 with 162 people on board slid off the end of the runway and stopped just short of a deep ravine near the South American country's capital.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Bert Wilkinson, Associated Press
GEORGETOWN, Guyana - Flight 523 from New York had just touched down and passengers were applauding the pilot's landing in the South American country Saturday when something suddenly went wrong. The Boeing 737-800 slid off the end of a rainy runway, crashed through a chain-link fence, and broke in half just short of a deep ravine. All 163 people aboard survived. Officials were starting to probe the crash even as they marveled at the lack of fatalities. "We must be the luckiest country and luckiest set of people in the world to escape so lightly," said Health Minister Leslie Ramsammy, who said more than 30 people were taken to the hospital.
NEWS
April 30, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shareesa Bollers often seeks out her teachers after class, eager to soak up just a little bit more knowledge. She runs track, gives tours of her school, helps select its new teachers, and is a playwright and actress. "She is one of the most voracious and tenacious learners that we have. She is dogged in her pursuit of understanding," said Diana Laufenberg, a social studies teacher at Science Leadership Academy (SLA) and Bollers' student adviser. "She's just a cool kid," said Christopher Lehmann, the Center City magnet school's principal.
NEWS
April 26, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Claudius A.R. Elcock, 87, a family physician in West Philadelphia for 40 years, died of cancer Wednesday, March 31, at his home in Garnet Valley. Dr. Elcock opened an office on 57th Street in 1966. Ten years later, he joined the staff of the city's Health Center No. 4, on Haverford Avenue. For years he spent days at the health center and kept his private practice open at night. In 1993, he closed his office. He continued to practice part time at the health center until 2006.
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