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Gwendolyn Faison

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NEWS
March 9, 2005 | By Dwight Ott and Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Camden's nonpartisan mayoral race is shaping up to be a crowded referendum on the city's revitalization efforts. The three major candidates on May 10 will be Councilman Ali Sloan El, a maverick known for opposing the state-run rehabilitation of the city and the $1 billion Cramer Hill redevelopment project, and two officials who support both initiatives, Democratic Assemblywoman Nilsa Cruz-Perez and incumbent Gwendolyn Faison. Mary Cortes, 49, a Cramer Hill activist who has mobilized opposition to the redevelopment, also is running, and former mayoral candidate Keith Walker, 46, is expected to file soon.
NEWS
August 15, 1998 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Whitman's appointment of a review board to oversee Camden's finances drew a mix of resignation, fear and anxiety from the city's Council president yesterday. "It poses a threat, but we'll take it in stride and work with it," said Gwendolyn Faison, a fervent ally of Camden Mayor Milton Milan, of the board's authority. The oversight board's broad powers were outlined this week when the governor approved a "statement of imminent peril," characterizing Camden's financial condition as severe and the city as no longer able to handle its debts.
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | By Melanie Burney and Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gwendolyn Faison knows about filling big shoes in tough times. She did so as a girl growing up in North Carolina, and she has done so repeatedly as a political power broker in Camden. As the fifth of nine children, Faison was summoned often by her parents to take on such adult responsibilities as paying bills and running errands. Years later, she has often found herself answering the call to assume a key political role, whether it was filling a vacancy on the Camden County Freeholder Board in 1985 or coming out of retirement to return to City Council in 1997.
NEWS
June 13, 2005
Voters in Camden will elect a mayor tomorrow in a runoff between Assemblywoman Nilsa Cruz-Perez and incumbent Gwendolyn Faison. The Inquirer is endorsing GWENDOLYN FAISON for another term. Camden's next mayor will regain more power in 2007, when the city is scheduled to emerge from the state takeover that began in 2002. Faison is better qualified to provide experienced, steady leadership as the economically struggling city confronts challenges such as redeveloping the Cramer Hill neighborhood, combating rampant crime and working through a comprehensive plan for the city's riverfront.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
"I could be retired and eating grapes somewhere," says Camden's acting mayor, Gwendolyn Faison, "but I want to help my city and turn it around. Camden is a good place, but we've had corrupt mayors and poor financial management. " That surely captures the dilemma of the poorest city in New Jersey. As one member of a rare breed, someone who still invests capital in the city, puts it: "Camden should be in receivership; it has a structural deficit and a talent deficit. " Ms. Faison, a former county freeholder, has been performing mayoral duties since the March 2000 indictment of her predecessor, the now-convicted Milton Milan.
NEWS
April 16, 2010 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden Mayor Dana L. Redd announced her first three appointments to the city's school board Thursday. They are current member Kathryn Blackshear; Sean M. Brown, a Rutgers University-Camden student and community activist; and Raymond L. Lamboy, head of the local Latin American Economic Development Association. They were nominated by a steering committee. "After reviewing the committee's recommendations, I believe Mr. Lamboy, Ms. Blackshear, and Mr. Brown possess the exact type of commitment, leadership, and knowledge that will strengthen and [enhance]
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 30 protesters yesterday told the six male members of Camden City Council to stand up to the Democratic machine and "be a man" and retain Gwendolyn Faison as Council president. Faison said this week that she had been told by someone she would not identify that she would lose her presidential post at Monday's reorganization if she did not pull out of the mayor's race and support interim Mayor Aaron A. Thompson. Faison is the only woman on City Council and the highest-ranking female elected official in the city of Camden.
NEWS
May 25, 2005 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After former candidate Keith Walker endorsed Nilsa Cruz-Perez yesterday in the Camden mayoral runoff, the two shook hands and posed for a photograph. "We don't shake hands. We hug," Cruz-Perez said before embracing Walker. Moments before, both had talked about forming "one community, one family" and "working across artificial barriers" to turn around one of the nation's most distressed cities. Cruz-Perez, seeking to become Camden's first female Hispanic mayor, will face incumbent Gwendolyn Faison on June 14. In a city with a history of voting along racial lines, Walker, an African American who endorsed Faison in the last election, said Cruz-Perez would unite diverse communities "for common goals and to confront common enemies.
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | By Herbert Lowe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The City Council welcomed back Gwendolyn Faison yesterday and quickly chose her, the only woman member, as the new president. "This nomination is for the recognized leadership and exemplary work of a great lady," Councilman Israel Nieves said before he and his colleagues endorsed his motion unanimously. Faison, 71, Nieves, 44, and Gilbert "Whip" Wilson, 50, were each sworn in to four-year terms as at-large Council members. Each beat out 13 other candidates in the city's May 13 election.
NEWS
February 5, 2000 | By Dwight Ott and Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Four decades ago, it was a predominantly Jewish community in Camden and included lawyers, doctors and architects. Today, the predominantly African American middle-class neighborhood called Parkside is one of the few stable communities left in the city. But recently, Parkside has become dotted with vacant houses and pockmarked with drug corners. Yesterday, an open house was held inside a two-story townhouse that has been renovated and saved from decay through an organization called the Parkside Business and Community Partnership Inc. The organization aims to "reverse the decline of Parkside and make it a desirable place to live," said Bridget Phifer, executive director of the organization.
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NEWS
April 16, 2010 | By Rita Giordano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden Mayor Dana L. Redd announced her first three appointments to the city's school board Thursday. They are current member Kathryn Blackshear; Sean M. Brown, a Rutgers University-Camden student and community activist; and Raymond L. Lamboy, head of the local Latin American Economic Development Association. They were nominated by a steering committee. "After reviewing the committee's recommendations, I believe Mr. Lamboy, Ms. Blackshear, and Mr. Brown possess the exact type of commitment, leadership, and knowledge that will strengthen and [enhance]
NEWS
May 28, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camden's Democratic mayoral primary next week comes down to $18,000 vs. $0. The former is the amount raised by Dana Redd, a state senator, city councilwoman, vice-chair of the state Democratic Party, veteran of several government appointments, and, in the words of one supporter at a rally last week, "the chosen one. " The latter is the combined amount the other two candidates have raised for the June 2 primary, according to state reporting documents...
NEWS
February 8, 2009 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With New Jersey Democratic heavyweights framing her as Camden's Barack Obama, State Sen. Dana Redd announced her candidacy for mayor yesterday. "Thank you for accepting my invitation to believe," Redd, who is also vice president of City Council, told 200 people under a tent on the street in the Centerville section where her mother grew up. Running under the motto "United for Change" with a logo reminiscent of the Obama O, the 40-year-old Redd...
NEWS
November 14, 2008 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The "people's champ" is back. And this time, he has a new nickname. Ali Sloan El, the former Camden councilman and mayoral candidate who went to prison last year for accepting $36,000 in bribes, is on his way to being a free man and poised to stir the political waters again. "The community needs their champ back," Sloan El, wearing a white baseball cap with Coach inked in on the bill, said yesterday outside a halfway house in North Philadelphia. "Coach" is the nickname that Sloan El, 54, picked up at the Edgefield Federal Correctional Institution in South Carolina, where he led the softball and basketball teams to a combined 11 prison titles from July 2007, when his sentence began, through last week, when he was transferred to the halfway house.
NEWS
December 30, 2007 | By Sam Wood and Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Last summer, Loresha Gaines buried her son, a 12-year-old boy gunned down with an assault rifle while sitting in a parked car in Camden. "We miss you so much, Martin. You don't know what it's like talking to a picture," she said shortly after the funeral. "But I want you to rest. We're all going to be together in the end. " James Martin "Pee Wee" Coleman is the youngest homicide victim in Camden so far this year. Though his death was widely publicized, it was hardly unique.
NEWS
August 4, 2007 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In just one day, a Pennsauken field of dirt sprouted a house. The basement had been excavated, a foundation poured, walls erected, the roof shingled. The day after that, 25 windows were installed, and the house was clad with slate-blue siding. Though it takes months - maybe years - to remodel most kitchens, an army of blue-shirted, hard-hatted volunteers has been working around the clock this week on what must be South Jersey's speediest home construction project. Most of the work was to be finished by today, ahead of schedule.
NEWS
July 17, 2007 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cooper University Hospital's "most famous patient" returned yesterday - this time bringing word of $6.4 million for a cancer treatment center in Camden. "I am glad to have arrived by car this time rather than helicopter," quipped Gov. Corzine, who was flown in after an April 12 crash that severely injured him. Corzine's visit was the second time this year he has come to the city to announce a major development push; the first time was to announce a Campbell Soup Co. expansion plan.
NEWS
October 25, 2006 | James E. Murrell
Re: "Primas Resigns as Camden Overseer," by Dwight Ott, Wendy Ruderman and Kristen A. Graham, Oct. 13. I had mixed feelings when I read about the resignation of Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr. Surprise, though, was not among them. Considering the political maelstrom enveloping State Sen. Wayne Bryant, I thought it was only a matter of time before Primas, Bryant's financial ally, would come under the scrutiny of state and federal authorities. But as I thought more, I wondered about his replacement, or if he should be replaced.
NEWS
September 8, 2005 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some high-profile members of Camden's Hispanic community voiced dissatisfaction yesterday over the reassignment, at reduced pay, of the most visible Latino member of Mayor Gwendolyn Faison's cabinet. Yolanda Aguilar de Neely served as the mayor's executive assistant during her hotly fought reelection campaign this year and was at Faison's side during many public appearances. This week, she was back where she started, as a mayor's aide. Her salary will drop to $69,791 from the $79,981 she earned as executive assistant.
NEWS
June 16, 2005 | By Dwight Ott and Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In the end, Camden's unlikely coalition worked. A last-minute surge of support from some of her most vocal critics gave Mayor Gwendolyn Faison the edge she needed Tuesday to beat an all-out challenge from Assemblywoman Nilsa Cruz-Perez in a runoff election. Councilman Ali Sloan El, who has knocked Faison for years, and demolition mogul William Hargrove, who has tangled with her legally and verbally, were among those clapping and chanting her name on election night. Unofficial results showed Faison basically picking up the votes that had gone to Sloan El in the predominantly African American areas of Camden during the May 10 nonpartisan election, in which he placed third.
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