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Habitat

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September 10, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
'Do you know any lesbians in Wyoming?" New York performance artist Sharon Hayes just kept asking people, until she hit pay dirt: a small community of lesbians in Laramie. They became part of last year's nearly four-month-long "Lesbian Love Tour," during which she toured 29 states and encountered 700 lesbians. The pilgrimage, whose grail was to find "lesbians in their natural habitat," became the basis for a 75-minute performance piece called The Lesbian, Part II of the Lesbian Love Tour.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Jacqueline L. Maroccia, Special to The Inquirer
Where most people see a blighted, abandoned corner building where drugs are sold and consumed, Ed Dreby envisions a big, freshly painted house for a family to make into a home. Dreby, a coordinator for Habitat for Humanity, wasn't always convinced the ramshackle former butcher shop at the corner of Green and St. Mary Streets in Burlington City was the perfect building for the nonprofit group to rehabilitate. "When I first saw it, I said, 'Oh, my God,' " Dreby said. The Burlington County affiliate of Habitat, a national group that remodels homes and then provides them at reduced costs to low-income and homeless families to purchase, usually takes on one or two projects a year.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Scott Sonner, Associated Press
RENO, Nev. - Smokey Bear has done such a good job stamping out forest fires the last half-century that a woodpecker that has survived for millions of years by eating beetle larvae in burned trees is in danger of going extinct in parts of the West, according to conservationists seeking U.S. protection for the bird. Four conservation groups filed a petition with the U.S. Interior Department this month to list the black-backed woodpecker under the Endangered Species Act in the Sierra Nevada, Oregon's Eastern Cascades, and the Black Hills of eastern Wyoming and western South Dakota.
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Birds' numbers have plunged sharply over the last half-century. Loss of habitat, damage from predators, and widespread use of aerial pesticides that kill their insect diet decimated the populations of common nighthawks and chimney swifts in New Jersey and across the birds' breeding range in the United States and Canada. The numbers of both have dropped by about 2 percent a year since 1966, based on bird counts in designated tracts, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lenny Bazemore remembers heating pots of water on the stove to fill the bathtub. He remembers waiting his turn and bathing in dirty water. He remembers hunger. He remembers poverty. "We didn't have much, but we had love, we had family," Bazemore said. "We didn't have much, but we had each other. " On Thursday, Bazemore, 46, now a successful businessman, sought to honor the family of his childhood best friend, who lived across the street in Norristown. He had purchased the family's home after the parents died, planning to flip it for a profit.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It promised to be a dream community. Nestled in the lush pine forests of Evesham, it was called Sanctuary, offering a quiet retreat to families willing to pay to get away from the hustle and bustle of urban living. But the natural surroundings that lent the community its appeal ultimately came back to haunt it. With just a third of 300 planned homes built, endangered timber rattlesnakes slithered out of hibernation and into the path of construction workers in 1998. The Pinelands Commission, charged with regulating growth and safeguarding resources within the environmentally sensitive Pinelands, recalled preliminary approvals for the project, halting construction.
NEWS
October 6, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students from Eastern University will help with household chores and yardwork this fall to raise money for Habitat for Humanity. Raking, gardening, painting and cleaning are among the tasks the students will tackle in the St. Davids area. They plan to work Saturdays through November in exchange for donations to the nonprofit organization, which builds and renovates houses for the poor. Last year, about 25 students collected $12,000 for the organization. Their work two years ago brought in $25,000 to help pay for their service trip to New Zealand.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2009 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The construction crew at 822 Cherry St. in Norristown was, to say the least, a bit unconventional. Eighteen-year-old Megan Donnelly, in yellow sneakers and blue nail polish, was gingerly hammering braces between floor beams. Helping her Wednesday was John Canty, a 61-year-old respiratory therapist from Temple Hospital who cited as his job qualifications homeownership and 39 years of marriage. A floor above, high school senior Geliece Douglas was worrying she might dirty her new footwear, so she worked in her green-and-black-striped socks.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
A Burlington County farmer who damaged the habitat of a federally protected turtle species by clearing several rows of trees on his 140-acre North Hanover Township farm was sentenced in federal court Tuesday to a year's probation. James Durr, who is deputy mayor of the township, pleaded guilty in January to harassing endangered bog turtles in 2005. He removed the trees along Turtle Creek, upland from the habitat, and didn't think his actions would affect the turtles, he said.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By John Murphy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Baseball diamonds or backyards? Those are the opposing plans for a four-acre lot that is the subject of debate by borough officials and Habitat for Humanity of Greater Bucks. The lot - on the corner of Maple and Otter Streets - was donated to Habitat for Humanity last year. The group's president, Brian Reiff, says it would like to build homes for about 20 families there. But Borough Mayor Gary Tosti and council members are opposing construction of houses on the property.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 26, 2016
At the Convention Centers Conventions expecting 500 or more to attend.    Date Attendance     2016 Hero Conference2     Apr. 24-26   1,000    Habitat for Humanity Annual Luncheon3     Apr. 26   1,500    Philly I-Day3     Apr. 28   800    PA Bar Institute: Employment Law Institute 20163     Apr. 28-29   500    Congress ICFSR 20163     Apr. 28-30   700    Broad Street...
NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The half-built, two-story duplex is tucked on a small lane in Cinnaminson, close to a woods adjacent to the Delaware River. It has walls, and its roof was installed last week. But the house still needs siding and windows, and more critically, two veterans willing to move in with their families and to assume an interest-free mortgage that is less than the average rental payment. Habitat for Humanity of Burlington County recently hung an American flag from a utility pole on the front lawn, as if to drive the point home.
NEWS
November 29, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Habitat for Humanity of Burlington County has received a low-interest $420,000 loan from the New Jersey Economic Development Authority to purchase the building that houses its administrative offices and its ReStore center in Maple Shade. EDA chief executive officer Melissa Orsen held a press event at the center this week to raise awareness of the financing that the EDA offers to small businesses and nonprofits. "Organizations like Habitat for Humanity serve a dual purpose in our state's economy," Orsen said in a statement.
NEWS
November 21, 2015
A Nov. 9 article about the Cira Green plaza mischaracterized the ownership of a 25,000-square-foot parcel of land behind 30th Street Station. It is owned by Amtrak. A story Friday about the donation of a Norristown home to Habitat for Humanity misstated the purchase price of the home by businessman Lenny Bazemore. It was $45,000.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lenny Bazemore remembers heating pots of water on the stove to fill the bathtub. He remembers waiting his turn and bathing in dirty water. He remembers hunger. He remembers poverty. "We didn't have much, but we had love, we had family," Bazemore said. "We didn't have much, but we had each other. " On Thursday, Bazemore, 46, now a successful businessman, sought to honor the family of his childhood best friend, who lived across the street in Norristown. He had purchased the family's home after the parents died, planning to flip it for a profit.
NEWS
August 25, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Birds' numbers have plunged sharply over the last half-century. Loss of habitat, damage from predators, and widespread use of aerial pesticides that kill their insect diet decimated the populations of common nighthawks and chimney swifts in New Jersey and across the birds' breeding range in the United States and Canada. The numbers of both have dropped by about 2 percent a year since 1966, based on bird counts in designated tracts, according to the North American Breeding Bird Survey.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ronald L. Martin, 67, of Tabernacle, executive editor of the Burlington County Times from 1996 to 2008, died of cancer Saturday, July 11, at Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice in Mount Holly. Steve Todd, the newspaper's general manager since 2010, who had first met Mr. Martin at the Willingboro paper in the 1970s, said, "He was a true local community journalist. " "He was a great leader in the newsroom," Todd added. Beyond the newsroom, Todd said, "he was one of the directors for the Ellis Family Foundation . . . created by Shirley Ellis, one of the owners of the newspaper.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Outfitted with high ceilings, circles of furniture, and stacks of appliances and construction material, Habitat for Humanity's newest store was already a bustling place moments after Friday's grand opening. In the words of Corinne O'Connell, associate executive director of Habitat Philadelphia, the 17,000-square-foot store, housed in a nondescript, one-story building on Washington Avenue, is "Five Below meets Home Depot. " "We have everything but the clothes you wear and the mattress you sleep on," she said.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
They came with paint brushes, steel wool, and brawn. But what really got to Robert Sheppard - what made him cry in front of his wife for the first time in almost never - had to be the love. A dozen Samaritans soldiered into Sheppard's Oxford Circle rowhouse Sunday and attacked the shabby abode with fixer-upper resolve. Sheppard and his wife were barely making it in blue-collar retirement; the workers hoped this kindness would help. The 82-year-old Korean War veteran watched the workers and smiled, even while drawing breath from the oxygen tank that has made him feel less and less like the man he once was. He cracked jokes about the Eagles, about the time he ruined his knees by falling two decks on a Navy ship, and how the family never really took vacations and that was all right.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he created a natural habitat on the acre surrounding his Cape May County home, Mike Crewe didn't know he'd be summoned to court to answer for it. His Lower Township property had become a kind of oasis amid the area's manicured lawns, a colorful meadow for monarch butterflies, native bees, and other species of wildlife. Its native grasses, seed- and berry-laden plants, and nectar-bearing flowers such as milkweed provided a feast and a rest stop. So Crewe, program director of the New Jersey Audubon Society's Cape May Bird Observatory, was disappointed by the reaction of neighbors who complained about his unmowed grounds to the municipality, which cited him for code violations last winter.
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