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Habitat

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1998 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
'Do you know any lesbians in Wyoming?" New York performance artist Sharon Hayes just kept asking people, until she hit pay dirt: a small community of lesbians in Laramie. They became part of last year's nearly four-month-long "Lesbian Love Tour," during which she toured 29 states and encountered 700 lesbians. The pilgrimage, whose grail was to find "lesbians in their natural habitat," became the basis for a 75-minute performance piece called The Lesbian, Part II of the Lesbian Love Tour.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | By Jacqueline L. Maroccia, Special to The Inquirer
Where most people see a blighted, abandoned corner building where drugs are sold and consumed, Ed Dreby envisions a big, freshly painted house for a family to make into a home. Dreby, a coordinator for Habitat for Humanity, wasn't always convinced the ramshackle former butcher shop at the corner of Green and St. Mary Streets in Burlington City was the perfect building for the nonprofit group to rehabilitate. "When I first saw it, I said, 'Oh, my God,' " Dreby said. The Burlington County affiliate of Habitat, a national group that remodels homes and then provides them at reduced costs to low-income and homeless families to purchase, usually takes on one or two projects a year.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Scott Sonner, Associated Press
RENO, Nev. - Smokey Bear has done such a good job stamping out forest fires the last half-century that a woodpecker that has survived for millions of years by eating beetle larvae in burned trees is in danger of going extinct in parts of the West, according to conservationists seeking U.S. protection for the bird. Four conservation groups filed a petition with the U.S. Interior Department this month to list the black-backed woodpecker under the Endangered Species Act in the Sierra Nevada, Oregon's Eastern Cascades, and the Black Hills of eastern Wyoming and western South Dakota.
NEWS
November 13, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It promised to be a dream community. Nestled in the lush pine forests of Evesham, it was called Sanctuary, offering a quiet retreat to families willing to pay to get away from the hustle and bustle of urban living. But the natural surroundings that lent the community its appeal ultimately came back to haunt it. With just a third of 300 planned homes built, endangered timber rattlesnakes slithered out of hibernation and into the path of construction workers in 1998. The Pinelands Commission, charged with regulating growth and safeguarding resources within the environmentally sensitive Pinelands, recalled preliminary approvals for the project, halting construction.
NEWS
October 6, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students from Eastern University will help with household chores and yardwork this fall to raise money for Habitat for Humanity. Raking, gardening, painting and cleaning are among the tasks the students will tackle in the St. Davids area. They plan to work Saturdays through November in exchange for donations to the nonprofit organization, which builds and renovates houses for the poor. Last year, about 25 students collected $12,000 for the organization. Their work two years ago brought in $25,000 to help pay for their service trip to New Zealand.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2009 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The construction crew at 822 Cherry St. in Norristown was, to say the least, a bit unconventional. Eighteen-year-old Megan Donnelly, in yellow sneakers and blue nail polish, was gingerly hammering braces between floor beams. Helping her Wednesday was John Canty, a 61-year-old respiratory therapist from Temple Hospital who cited as his job qualifications homeownership and 39 years of marriage. A floor above, high school senior Geliece Douglas was worrying she might dirty her new footwear, so she worked in her green-and-black-striped socks.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
A Burlington County farmer who damaged the habitat of a federally protected turtle species by clearing several rows of trees on his 140-acre North Hanover Township farm was sentenced in federal court Tuesday to a year's probation. James Durr, who is deputy mayor of the township, pleaded guilty in January to harassing endangered bog turtles in 2005. He removed the trees along Turtle Creek, upland from the habitat, and didn't think his actions would affect the turtles, he said.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By John Murphy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Baseball diamonds or backyards? Those are the opposing plans for a four-acre lot that is the subject of debate by borough officials and Habitat for Humanity of Greater Bucks. The lot - on the corner of Maple and Otter Streets - was donated to Habitat for Humanity last year. The group's president, Brian Reiff, says it would like to build homes for about 20 families there. But Borough Mayor Gary Tosti and council members are opposing construction of houses on the property.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Doylestown Borough officials told representatives of Habitat for Humanity this week that they could not sell them a three-quarter-acre parcel of land because state law forbids the sale. Habitat for Humanity is an international organization that builds affordable houses for needy families with the help of volunteers. The group wanted to buy the vacant borough lot on Church Street near Ashland Street to build five homes of 900 to 1,200 square feet. Borough Solicitor Charles McIlhinney said state law required real estate valued at more than $1,500 to be sold through the bidding or auction process.
NEWS
August 2, 1991 | by Penelope M. Carrington, Daily News Staff Writer
For the past three weeks, Keith Kratz has been hammering nails, caulking windows, and laying floor tile all along the East Coast as a volunteer house builder for Habitat for Humanity International. "It has been a tremendous experience . . . These have been three of the more interesting weeks I've spent in my life," said Kratz, 22, of Telford, Pa. Kratz and 21 other people opted to spend seven to 15 weeks this summer in the traveling work camp of the ecumenical Christian housing ministry that enlists volunteers and the future homeowners to build and rehabilitate houses for low-income families, team leader Linda Behmke said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
They came with paint brushes, steel wool, and brawn. But what really got to Robert Sheppard - what made him cry in front of his wife for the first time in almost never - had to be the love. A dozen Samaritans soldiered into Sheppard's Oxford Circle rowhouse Sunday and attacked the shabby abode with fixer-upper resolve. Sheppard and his wife were barely making it in blue-collar retirement; the workers hoped this kindness would help. The 82-year-old Korean War veteran watched the workers and smiled, even while drawing breath from the oxygen tank that has made him feel less and less like the man he once was. He cracked jokes about the Eagles, about the time he ruined his knees by falling two decks on a Navy ship, and how the family never really took vacations and that was all right.
NEWS
November 24, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he created a natural habitat on the acre surrounding his Cape May County home, Mike Crewe didn't know he'd be summoned to court to answer for it. His Lower Township property had become a kind of oasis amid the area's manicured lawns, a colorful meadow for monarch butterflies, native bees, and other species of wildlife. Its native grasses, seed- and berry-laden plants, and nectar-bearing flowers such as milkweed provided a feast and a rest stop. So Crewe, program director of the New Jersey Audubon Society's Cape May Bird Observatory, was disappointed by the reaction of neighbors who complained about his unmowed grounds to the municipality, which cited him for code violations last winter.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
I'M THE FIRST person to admit when I am wrong and, boy, was I wrong. Sources had told me that 6ABC reporter Annie McCormick asked the station to take a leave of absence after her husband, lobbyist A.J. Marsico , was accused of sexual assault in September. But McCormick's leave, which lasted about 3 1/2 weeks, was actually due to a tumor. On her personal Facebook account, sources tell me, McCormick wrote two posts. The first, in early October, was posted after her surgery, thanking her doctors and assuring friends that she was recovering quite nicely with the help of her dog, Gigi , and husband, Marsico.
TRAVEL
September 29, 2014 | By Nicole DiCrecchio, For The Inquirer
This Valentine's Day, Jeff Ramspacher, my boyfriend of five years, wanted to give me a gift far better than jewelry or candy. Knowing that I've been an animal advocate my entire life and that elephants in particular have always had a special place in my heart, he surprised me with an adoption certificate for Lizzie, an ex-circus elephant now living at the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee. The sanctuary is the nation's largest natural-habitat refuge for Asian and African elephants.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long after dawn on Thursday, about 50 volunteers made their way over to a Point Breeze rowhouse neighborhood, ready to put in the sweat they had promised. They all wore the accessory of the day: hard hats. The volunteers, a mix of professional craftsmen and people with little or no experience in construction, had arrived by 7 a.m. because they had only three days to carry out their mission for Habitat for Humanity's Philadelphia chapter: completing a significant chunk of six rowhouses under construction - the framing and installation of windows - for families in need.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bulldozers began spreading sand on several South Jersey beaches along the Delaware Bay on Wednesday, the first of 31 projects to restore wildlife habitat damaged by Hurricane Sandy up and down the East Coast. The just-started project, in Cape May County, is a $1.65 million race to replenish beaches before the May horseshoe crab spawn and shorebird migration. The New Jersey projects are also seen as a way to indirectly benefit residential bay communities, which many feel have not received a fair share of restoration money.
REAL_ESTATE
February 3, 2014 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Habitat for Humanity works in partnership with low-income families to provide affordable opportunities for homeownership. But Habitat, which has been active in this region since 1985, also is working to show that builders don't need stacks of greenbacks to be green. In December, Habitat completed its 171st house locally, on Wilt Street in North Philadelphia, which has earned LEED Gold certification. This month, the nonprofit is scheduled to complete the semidetached house next door and anticipates a similar LEED designation.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
When a rare cancer ended the too short, but bountiful, life of Leo Roselli, upward of 700 people lined up to pay their respects at his nearly five-hour wake. Even his preschool teacher came. "I never took a bathroom break," his widow, Laura Roselli, said. While she and Leo's other family and friends knew he was a great guy, they had no idea of the extent of his good works - the long list of people to whom he delivered free food from his family's Italian food business, the funds he raised, the chores he did for people in need.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Tom Johnson, NJ SPOTLIGHT
In a dispute about how best to protect hundreds of thousands of acres of state-owned forests, the environmental community remains deeply at odds over a bill that would allow commercial logging on woodlands in New Jersey. In a letter Monday to Gov. Christie, several of the most prominent environmental organizations urged him to veto a bill given final approval a week ago by the Assembly. The issue revolves around the most suitable way to preserve New Jersey's woodlands. Both critics and advocates of the bill agree this resource faces serious questions about its long-term viability.
NEWS
May 1, 2013 | By Jon Hurdle, NJ SPOTLIGHT
Hunters love to shoot them and birders love to watch them, but both groups understand that they can save the bobwhite quail only by working together. The groups came together for a three-day conference to talk about preserving the scarce and secretive game bird and identify other areas of common interest, ranging from fighting invasive species and maintaining healthy forests to managing New Jersey's growing population of black bears. The Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey and the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs held their first joint conference from Friday through Sunday with a view to identifying common interests and fostering cooperation.
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