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Hack

NEWS
October 9, 2007 | By Eugene R. Dunn
During a recent Bruce Springsteen mini-concert on NBC's Today, he introduced a new song, "Livin' in the Future," and talked about what's great in America. He cited cheeseburgers, the Jersey Shore, the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry. Then he turned to a darker list: "illegal wiretapping, voter suppression, no habeas corpus. " I take exception. What exactly does he mean by illegal wiretapping? After 9/11, in an effort to uncover terrorist cells living in the United States and to thwart further murderous attacks on Americans, President Bush signed the Patriot Act, which was ratified by Congress, thus making it the official law of the land.
NEWS
September 24, 1996
Can't blame it on the Russians anymore. Besides, it would be pretty sad if the once-ferocious Bear's spies had launched an assault on the CIA by hacking their way into the agency's Internet site to leave the sophomoric greeting, "Welcome to the Central Stupidity Agency. " No, last week's incident of cyber-vandalism on a U.S. government World Wide Web site wasn't an incident of international espionage - no more than a digital burglary at the Justice Department's Web site was in August.
NEWS
August 7, 1999 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
About 30 taxicabs staged a horn-honking demonstration in front of the Daily News building yesterday, protesting a series of articles in the newspaper about problems with the city's taxis. "We're mad at you," declared James Walker, director of the 60-member Brotherhood of Unified Taxi Drivers and Owners. "We're upset. " A series of newspaper articles titled "Can't hack it" has charged that some of Philadelphia's taxicabs are mechanical heaps that imperil passengers. The stories also contend that state regulators do little to ensure public safety.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2012
"After extensive deliberations with the board, I recommended to them that I was no longer the right person to lead Sunoco as it progresses to the next phase of its future. " - Lynn L. Elsenhans, announcing she will step down as chief executive officer of Sunoco Inc. after leading the Philadelphia company in winding down its oil-refining businesses. "She was brought here to do something, she did it, and now she's going. I know a couple thousand people who wouldn't mind helping her pack.
NEWS
August 14, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It certainly looks like the location where they're shooting Hack. The police have sealed off traffic. And production sentries wearing headsets are moving pedestrians to the opposite sidewalk, cautioning them to be silent. In the middle of the block, ringed by a small army of sound, light and camera crew members, David Morse is filming a scene with a woman and a young man on the front porch of his character's house. But wait. At the risk of sounding like the Talking Heads, this is not his wife, this is not his son, this is not his modest house.
NEWS
June 2, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Abducted, bound, drugged, and awaiting the aid of a disgraced cop turned cabbie. All in a day's work. Washington Township's Amanda Danielle VanDerziel, 16, plays a naive teenager who, after a conversation with a stranger on the Internet, is lured from her suburban home in the debut episode of a television show set in Philadelphia. Hack stars David Morse, of St. Elsewhere fame, as Mike Olshansky, a police officer fallen from grace. Helping fares he meets in his new job driving a taxi, Olshansky uses his detective skills to become a freelance do-gooder.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | By David Lee Preston, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Thomas Turcol also contributed to this article
As a four-term GOP state senator from Cherry Hill, he was an iconoclast who never voted for a tax increase or a budget. Republicans couldn't count on him; Democrats dubbed him "Dr. No. " In his final campaign in 1991, his opponent won calling him "arrogant," "parasitic," "the ultimate political hack. " Yesterday, Lee B. Laskin moved a step closer to yet another title: Judge. Laskin, 58, one of the most controversial political figures in Camden County, was among five nominees to the New Jersey Superior Court announced by Gov. Whitman to fill vacancies around the state.
NEWS
November 12, 2002
YOU OUGHTA be in pictures. Or better yet, your neighborhood oughta be. Philadelphia is now the silent co-star in two programs that have won sizable audiences: "Hack" and "American Dreams. " "Hack" has done a decent job of showing Philadelphia in all its gritty charm, with forays into Fishtown, Manayunk and West Philadelphia. (Recently canceled "Philly" never much got past Center City.) "American Dreams," on the other hand, hasn't filmed much in Philadelphia, even though there are neighborhoods that haven't changed since the 1960s, the show's focus.
NEWS
July 20, 1988 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like pitchmen, they hawk their chariots, these underground chauffeurs of Camden. "Ride, sugar?" "Taxi?" They ply their gypsy trade to shoppers who enter the Pathmark on Mount Ephraim Avenue or who exit the cashier's line. Gypsy cabbies they are, men who scratch out an income by giving rides to the poor without wheels. Some charge market rates; others take only donations. There are no meters, no taxi licenses from the city, no commercial liability insurance - just a familiar coach to climb into and a hack who might even bag the groceries and deliver them along with the passenger to the doorstep.
NEWS
December 3, 2002 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
The interior of St. Gabriel's Church at 29th and Dickinson in Grays Ferry is magnificent - a block-long, cavernous space of wooden pews, marble floors, stained glass, and three-story-high pillars. It is in an unlikely neighborhood for Hollywood types, but during the last several months, a lot of them have walked through as members of the cast and crew of Hack, the first network series to be shot entirely in Philadelphia. "It's marvelous. It's certainly no soundstage in Santa Monica [Calif.
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