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Hack

ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | By ELLEN GRAY Daily News Television Critic 215-854-5950
The historic streets of Philadelphia may have been passed up for Virginia reproductions in the HBO miniseries "John Adams," but at least we can claim George Washington. David Morse, the versatile Philadelphia-based actor who spent two seasons driving a cab here in "Hack" shows up in a white wig and a nose and accent not his own in the second of two episodes premiering Sunday. Just know that he fought for the nose. "I had to convince them," he said last month during an interview in HBO's New York offices.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | By Colbert I. King
Soldiers in the Al Gore and George W. Bush camps have shown all the class of the worst elements on the U.S. Olympics team. The bad sportsmanship of swimmer Amy Van Dyken, "Colorado's Golden Girl," who's given to scooping up handfuls of water and spitting them into the lane of her opponents before the race starts; the obnoxious exhibitionism of Baltimore's 400-meter hurdler James Carter; and the post-race antics of the men's relay team have nothing...
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Last night's opening at the Walnut Street Theater was formally described as a "world premiere. " This would suggest that Dumas, the historical comedy by John MacNicholas, is a new play. Maybe that's part of the joke, because it is hard to find anything new in the work. MacNicholas is a professor of English at the University of South Carolina. What he has given the world in this premiere is a confused piece of academic hack work that borrows inspiration from several sources.
SPORTS
April 20, 1997 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you saw Tiger Woods' post-Masters TV interview from the Butler Cabin last Sunday, you saw the young titan talk about something near and dear to golfers everywhere. His "A-game. " His 12-stroke victory, he told CBS's Jim Nance, was the first time as a pro that he really had his A-game clicking - well, except for his front-nine 40 in the first round. Ah, the A-game. What golfer alive - regardless of whether he or she is Tiger Woods, a 15-handicapper or the worst weekend hack - doesn't have an A-game, a B-game and a I-don't-want-to-talk-about-it game?
SPORTS
July 18, 1991 | By Dick Polman, Inquirer Staff Writer
When baseball is played with panache, it looks something like this: The leadoff man triggers the winning rally. The young second baseman whacks a clutch hit in the eighth. The young third baseman powers a ball into the bullpen. The young starter smothers the opposition until the eighth. And the closer picks up another save. So it went yesterday, as the Phillies downed the Los Angeles Dodgers, 4-2, in a victory that moved reliever Mitch Williams to declare, "The whole attitude of the team has changed in the second half.
NEWS
September 11, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Even when he makes a simple caper movie, actor/environmentalist Robert Redford cannot resist plugging his favorite causes. In "Sneakers," he plays security expert Martin Bishop, who cut his teeth in college by tapping into the computers of the Republican National Committee and AT&T, and transferring funds to whale-saving organizations and the like. The successful company Bishop founded, along with a former CIA agent (Sidney Poitier), employs a half-dozen borderline-criminal geniuses who are experts in computer hacking, electronic surveillance and audio technology.
NEWS
December 5, 1996
One of Bill Clinton's best buds, James Carville, is gearing up a p.r. campaign to call independent counsel Kenneth Starr a political hack who's just out to get the Clintons. But this caricature of Mr. Starr, a distinguished attorney with Republican connections, is belied by the fact that Attorney General Janet Reno keeps expanding his authority as new allegations come to light. Clearly, the political hack in this tangle is Mr. Carville, "the Ragin' Cajun" who managed the 1992 Clinton campaign.
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | By Gaiutra Bahadur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Borough Council voted, 4-0, last night to change a 30-year-old ordinance that barred immigrants who are not yet U.S. citizens from driving taxis. Officials said the restriction, which has not been consistently enforced since it became law in 1969, was a relic of a less tolerant period in the borough's past. Without debate or dissent, the council amended the ordinance, which has been called unconstitutional by the American Civil Liberties Union, to make all legal immigrants eligible for taxi drivers' licenses.
NEWS
July 5, 2012 | By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON - Britain's Supreme Court took a step toward exposing the names at the heart of Britain's phone-hacking scandal Wednesday, ruling that a private investigator convicted of eavesdropping for a Rupert Murdoch-owned tabloid must reveal who ordered him to do it. Meanwhile, a police investigation into press wrongdoing triggered by the hacking revelations expanded beyond Murdoch's media empire with the arrest of a former reporter from the rival Mirror...
NEWS
January 12, 2000 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
WANTED: 150 men and women to serve as ambassadors of the City of Brotherly Love. This high-profile career is ideal for candidates capable of non-lethal social interaction with tourists, Republicans and drunks, and who possess a marginal fluency in English and a working knowledge of local landmarks and traffic laws. Applicants must enjoy travel and demonstrate ability to read a map. Salary: $1.80 plus 30 cents per 1/6th mile, plus tips. Would-be Philadelphia ambassadors, a/k/a cabbies, can make their application to the state Public Utility Commission starting today.
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