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SPORTS
January 14, 2012
Al Attles' favorite memory of Wilt Chamberlain: The legendary 100-point game he produced for the Philadelphia Warriors against the Knicks on March 2, 1962. But Attles, who attends every Warriors home game, also remembers being on hand just days earlier when Chamberlain - his former teammate - set a record with 34 free-throw attempts. Attles never expected either record to be broken in his lifetime. But there he was Thursday night, watching as Dwight Howard stepped to the foul line time and again in the Magic's 117-109 victory at Golden State.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - A former top lawyer for Rupert Murdoch's British newspapers insisted Wednesday that he told the mogul's son there was evidence of widespread phone hacking at the now-defunct News of the World tabloid. Tom Crone questioned contentions made by James Murdoch - chairman of News International, the British arm of his father's media empire - that he had not been informed about an e-mail indicating that hacking was rife. For months, News International insisted the illegal accessing of the cellphone voice messages of celebrities and crime victims was confined to reporter Clive Goodman, who, along with private investigator Glenn Mulcaire, was jailed in 2007.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - They couldn't be more different - the handsome, world-famous actor and the quiet parents who endured unspeakable tragedy. But together they've become the most public faces of Britain's phone-hacking scandal, and Monday they testified about their run-ins with this country's ferociously competitive tabloid press. For Hugh Grant, it was the paparazzi who wouldn't stop harassing the mother of his child for photos and the gossip rag that allegedly accessed his phone messages and wrongly concluded that he was cheating on his girlfriend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
HUGH GRANT starred in a London courtroom yesterday, testifying in a judge-led media-ethics inquiry regarding Britain's deservedly beleaguered press. Earlier testimony came from the parents of a murdered schoolgirl whose phone was targeted by reporters from the now-defunct tabloid News of the World . You know, the scandal in which the reporters all got fired but their editor walked away with a few million pounds. Grant, however, said he believes his phone was hacked by Britain's Mail on Sunday tabloid - the first time he has implicated a newspaper not owned by Rupert Murdoch . Grant said he could not think of any other way than eavesdropping on his voice mails that the Mail could have obtained the story alleging that his romance with Jemima Khan was on the rocks due to his conversations with a "plummy voiced" woman identified as a film-studio executive.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The latest big-time Hollywood scandal continues - and it's caught the attention of none other than the Federal Bureau of Investigation. As SideShow reported Thursday, the feddy bears are investigating "computer hacking attacks on celebrities" after cellphone photos appeared online that seemed to show actress Scarlett Johansson posing in the buff. That followed apparently hacked pics of a nude Jessica Alba on the Internet. Reports also say Mila Kunis and Justin Timberlake , stars of Friends With Benefits , had cellphone photos snatched and posted online.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - British police on Tuesday made their 11th arrest in their continuing investigation into phone hacking by the now-shuttered Sunday tabloid the News of the World, owned by the British newspaper arm of Rupert Murdoch's media empire. A 71-year-old, named in media reports as Stuart Kuttner, former managing editor of the News of the World, was arrested on charges of conspiracy to intercept communications and corruption when he voluntarily appeared for questioning at a central London police station.
NEWS
July 24, 2011
This used to be a noble profession. Still is, to tell you the truth. To hear an editor debate whether a story is fair to some deplorable individual most would consider unworthy of the effort or to watch a reporter rush toward danger to tell a story that needs telling is to be unalterably convinced of the honor in this work. But even in the saying, you brace for the derision and scorn - according to Gallup, the public ranks journalists between auto mechanics and lawyers in terms of ethics - that will surely follow.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Cassandra Vinograd, Associated Press
LONDON - Scotland Yard's assistant commissioner resigned Monday, a day after his boss also quit, and fresh investigations of possible police wrongdoing were launched in the phone-hacking scandal that has spread from Rupert Murdoch's media empire to the British prime minister's office. Prime Minister David Cameron called an emergency session of Parliament on the scandal and cut short his visit to Africa to try to contain the widening crisis. Lawmakers on Tuesday are to question Murdoch, his son James, and Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of Murdoch's U.K. newspaper arm. In a further twist, Sean Hoare, a former News of the World reporter who helped blow the whistle on the scandal was found dead Monday in his home, but the death was not believed to be suspicious.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - Scotland Yard's assistant commissioner resigned yesterday, a day after his boss also quit, and fresh investigations of possible police wrongdoing were launched in the phone-hacking scandal that has spread from Rupert Murdoch's media empire to the British prime minister's office. Prime Minister David Cameron called an emergency session of Parliament on the scandal and cut short his visit to Africa to try to contain the widening crisis. Lawmakers today are to question Murdoch, his son James and Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of Murdoch's U.K. newspaper arm. In a further twist, a former News of the World reporter who helped blow the whistle on the scandal was found dead yesterday in his home, but it was not believed to be suspicious.
NEWS
July 18, 2011 | Associated Press
LONDON - An intensifying voicemail-hacking and police-bribery scandal cut closer than ever to Rupert Murdoch and Scotland Yard yesterday with the arrest of the media magnate's former British newspaper chief and the resignation of London's police commissioner. Though the former executive, Rebekah Brooks, and the police chief, Paul Stephenson, have denied wrongdoing, both developments are ominous not only for Murdoch's News Corp., but for a British power structure that nurtured a cozy relationship with his papers for years.
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