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NEWS
July 15, 2011 | Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The phone-hacking scandal that has ignited a political firestorm in Britain jumped the Atlantic yesterday as the FBI opened an investigation into whether British reporters tried to access cellphone messages and records of victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in violation of U.S. law. The preliminary probe further rattled the New York-based global media empire of Rupert Murdoch, who was forced this week to withdraw his $12 billion bid to take over Britain's largest satellite broadcaster, and raises questions about the future of News Corp.
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Tom Hays, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The FBI has begun a preliminary inquiry based on concerns in Congress over a report that media mogul Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. sought to hack into the phones of Sept. 11 victims, a law enforcement official said Thursday. The decision to step in was made after Rep. Peter King (R., N.Y.) and several other members of Congress wrote to FBI Director Robert Mueller demanding an investigation, said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the official was not authorized to speak publicly.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON - Rupert Murdoch's dream of controlling a British broadcasting behemoth has evaporated with the withdrawal of his bid for BSkyB - the latest, biggest casualty of what Prime Minister David Cameron called the hacking "firestorm" sweeping through British politics, media, and police. Cameron appointed a senior judge to lead an inquiry into the phone-hacking and police-bribery scandal engulfing Murdoch's British newspapers, and promised it would investigate whether Murdoch's reporters sought the phone numbers of 9/11 victims in their quest for sensational scoops.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - As investors punished News Corp.'s stock again yesterday, questions arise anew about the leadership abilities of its chief executive, Rupert Murdoch. The phone-hacking scandal in Britain now threatens to engulf top executives, and has hobbled the company's stock, which has stagnated for a decade. If News Corp. operated like many corporations in the midst of scandal, the CEO's job would be in jeopardy. But the media conglomerate runs more like a family dynasty, and analysts suggest that Murdoch, its 80-year-old patriarch, is likely to maintain his grip for now. As the company's chief executive, Murdoch presides over an empire with a wide array of media assets, including the Fox broadcast network, cable channels such as FX and Fox News, TV stations, the 20th Century Fox movie studio and newspapers around the world, including the Wall Street Journal, the New York Post and the Sun , in the U.K. He controls the company through a family trust that owns 40 percent of the voting stock and the largest chunk of News Corp.'s shares at 12 percent.
NEWS
July 9, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - Prime Minister David Cameron's former communications chief and an ex-royal reporter were arrested Friday in a phone hacking and police corruption scandal that has already toppled a major tabloid and rattled the cozy relationship between British politicians and the powerful Murdoch media empire. The 168-year-old muckraking tabloid News of the World was shut down Thursday after being engulfed by allegations that its journalists paid police for information and hacked into the phone messages of celebrities, young murder victims, and even the grieving families of dead soldiers.
NEWS
July 7, 2011 | By Gregory Katz, Associated Press
LONDON - Britain's phone-hacking scandal intensified Wednesday as the scope of tabloid intrusion into private voice mails became clearer: Murder victims. Terror victims. Film stars. Sports figures. Politicians. The royal family's entourage. The focal point is the News of the World - now facing a spreading advertising boycott - and the top executives of its parent companies: Rebekah Brooks, chief executive of News International, and her boss, Rupert Murdoch. In his first comment since the latest details emerged, Murdoch said in a statement Wednesday that Brooks would continue to lead his British newspaper operation despite calls for her resignation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
TATTLE'S FAVE British tabloid, News of the World , has apologized to Sienna Miller for hacking into her cellphone messages. What? Hacking's not allowed? Why must they make this job so hard? Michael Silverleaf , a lawyer for News Group Newspapers, the publisher of News of The World and part of the Rupert Murdoch "news" empire, offered "sincere apologies" to Sienna in London's High Court yesterday. The company acknowledged that the information obtained through hacking should never have been published.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
If you tried to donate online to the Republican slate for Washington Township Council early this week, you got a whole lotta Shy Love instead. The "donate" icon on the official website of candidates Chris Del Borrello, Giancarlo D'Orazio, and Daniel Morley ( www.wtfreshstart.com ) hooked up would-be donors with Ms. Love, an adult-video performer who exhibits no signs of shyness. The apparent cyber attack gives the phrases political hack and dirty politics a new twist.
NEWS
July 23, 2010
IF ANDREW BREITBART hadn't already been exposed as a hack, maybe you could understand how his slander of Shirley Sherrod could get such traction. He is one of those slugs who emerges from the swamps every few years, passing themselves off as journalists and working to discredit perceived enemies with half-truths, innuendos and outright lies. He is a wholly owned subsidiary of the conservative movement, as are his Web tools, Breitbart.com and Biggovernment.com. He is not a prostitute.
NEWS
July 10, 2010 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three Haddonfield Memorial High School students pleaded guilty Thursday to charges connected to hacking into their school's computer system and changing grades, authorities said. A 14-year-old and 16-year-old student gained access to the system between January and March and changed some of their own and other students' grades. The two used keystroke recording software to retrieve passwords, which allowed them to enter secure areas of the district's computer system, according to Jason Laughlin, spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.
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