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Hacker

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NEWS
April 4, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"You think you see me, but believe me, you don't," says the villain at the opening of BecauseHeCan. As the play at McCarter Theatre proceeds, he is proved correct, but for more than the reason playwright Arthur Kopit had in mind. The fellow speaking is a hacker who gets into the computer of an upscale New York couple and does great damage to their lives. He is telling us, in effect, that his presence in their machine is invisible and undetectable. But the remark also reflects how the audience feels about the hacker when the play is done.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS - Interpol said yesterday that 25 suspected members of the loose-knit Anonymous hacker movement have been arrested in a sweep across Europe and South America. The international police agency said in a statement that the arrests in Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Spain had been carried out by national law-enforcement officers working under the support of Interpol's Latin American Working Group of Experts on Information Technology Crime. Those arrested, from ages 17 and 40, are suspected of planning coordinated cyberattacks against institutions including Colombia's defense ministry and presidential websites, Chile's Endesa electricity company and national library, as well as other targets.
NEWS
February 25, 2010 | By MICHAEL HINKELMAN, hinkelm@phillynews.com 215-854-2656
A high-school dropout admitted yesterday in federal court that he participated in the hijacking of Comcast's Internet home page in May 2008. Christopher Allen Lewis, 20, of Newark, Del., who pleaded guilty to a single count of conspiracy to intentionally damage a protected computer system, was a member of the hacker group Kryogeniks. When Comcast's Internet customers tried to connect to their e-mails or voice mails on May 28-29, 2008, they were redirected to a page boasting of the attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Swordfish. The password used by Groucho for access to a speakeasy in that masterwork of 20th-century cinema Horse Feathers. And maybe the password used by hacker Hugh Jackman for computer access to Drug Enforcement Administration slush funds in this minibyte of 21st-century cyber-thrillers. In the new movie of that title, it is also the DEA code name for covert bank accounts angled for by a supremely fishy figure named Gabriel (John Travolta). Despite Jackman's abundant charisma and costar Halle Berry's abundant charms (bared, gratuitously, in a scene that everyone will talk about)
BUSINESS
August 16, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
In the annals of digital nightmares, Mat Honan's could rank up there with an unscheduled trip into The Matrix . In one mind-bending hour, the writer for Wired magazine's Gadget Lab lost access to his Apple, Amazon, Google, and Twitter accounts. But that wasn't the worst. He then watched in horror as hackers posted offensive tweets in his name, erased eight years of his Gmail messages, and wiped all the memory from his iPhone, his iPad, and his Mac laptop. He lost all his unbacked-up data - including a year's worth of priceless photos of his daughter.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a cluttered fifth-floor studio in North Philadelphia, two huge pieces of plywood hang from the ceiling, pulsing in time with the music from a pair of high-end stereo speakers. thoompa-thoomp-thoomp . . . But whoa - upon closer inspection, the big pieces of plywood actually are the speakers. They have wires attached to the back, and, somehow, they sound really good. Typical for Hive76. It is a hacker space, a kind of inventors' clubhouse where castoff 21st-century junk and random parts are fused together in a collaborative cauldron of ideas.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A DELAWARE COUNTY man who considered himself a big deal in the online hacking community lied to a 9-1-1 dispatcher in September, claiming he was being held hostage, because he wanted to raise his status among hackers, authorities said yesterday. Michael Adams Jr., 22, of Marple, was charged with falsely reporting weapons of mass destruction, false alarms to an agency of public safety and related offenses for the Sept. 16 incident, the Delaware County District Attorney's Office announced.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
For a change, David beat Goliath. AT&T Corp. had sued in federal court to collect nearly $17,000 from a small Philadelphia law firm - even though the firm had been victimized by "hackers. " The bill was for long-distance toll calls made overseas, mostly to the Dominican Republic, over a nine-day period in August 1994. AT&T demanded payment, knowing that "hackers" had illegally accessed the firm's leased telephone system to make the overseas calls, and despite the firm's prompt notice that a scam was in progress.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Stallman sluggishly emerges from his cramped and cluttered office- cubicle at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It is 11 a.m., and he is without shirt or shoes. His eyes are half-closed, his shoulder-length, scraggly brown hair is uncombed. A blanket and pillow lie on a couch inside the door. He greets a visitor with a yawn. Say good morning to one of the most brilliant computer programmers in America, an eccentric and obsessive 37-year-old who has dedicated his life to writing complex and useful software that he gives away for free, and who is challenging others to do the same.
NEWS
April 5, 1996 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christopher A. Schanot, the 19-year-old St. Louis computer whiz who was arrested by the FBI last week in Broomall, was released to his parents yesterday and placed under house arrest - but only on condition that he not be allowed near a computer, or even talk about computers on the telephone. Schanot was also barred from contact with Netta Gilboa, the former Broomall woman with whom prosecutors believe he spent much of the last 10 months. Authorities say Gilboa, 37, helped Schanot run away from home after he became the anonymous source for a magazine article that Gilboa wrote about an ad-hoc, anti-big-business hacker group that called itself the Internet Liberation Front.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 20, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Computer hacking is still generally frowned upon. But hackathons, once the province of programmers and cool coders, have spread like viruses to almost every human domain, even health care. No gathering seemingly can exist without one, even if the brainstorming mostly uses such old-school materials as paper and Post-it notes instead of laptops. Such was the case Thursday when the new MIT Hacking Medicine Institute held a four-hour Idea Hack on the final day of BIO International 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning after Tuesday's election, Philadelphia City Council's website was hacked and replaced by a sparse black Web page with white text reading: "I am Muslim & Islam is my way of Life. " On Twitter, Cyber ComandOs, a group that identifies itself as a Muslim hacker team, took responsibility for the cyber attack. Efforts to reach the Cyber ComandOs were unsuccessful. City government sites, which are hosted separately from Council's, were not affected by the breach, according to Jane Roh, spokeswoman for Council President Darrell L. Clarke.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2014
THERE'S NO QUESTION the massive breach of Sony Pictures' computer system has provided a degree of titillation and amusement along with massive grief and paranoia for all concerned. But things took a dark and frightening turn yesterday when those behind the unprecedented hack (self-identified in an Orwellian manner as the "Guardians of Peace") threatened a "9/11"-style attack on movie theaters that screen "The Interview. " The film, which rolls out nationwide on Christmas Day, stars Seth Rogen and James Franco as TV gossip-show reporters who land an interview with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un , only to be asked by the CIA to assassinate him. It is generally believed that Sony's financing of the comedy is what provoked the Guardians to hack and leak the company's computer files.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
FOR THOSE of you scouring the Internet for those leaked photos of Tattle naked, stop wasting your time. There aren't any. Unless you count one bare-assed shot of Baby Tattle taken when film still had to be developed, we can't recall one time we ever stood in front of a mirror and took a selfie of our stuff. Heck, we don't even want to see it. One of the most bizarre and fascinating things we find about the latest hacker scandal of female celebrity nude shots is that so many celebrities take nude shots.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Computer hackers traced to China stole personal data belonging to 4.5 million patients who used hospitals owned by Community Health Systems, which includes 20 hospitals in Pennsylvania and one in South Jersey. The stolen information included patient names, addresses, birth dates, and telephone and Social Security numbers, but not credit card or medical information, according to a report filed with the federal government by Community Health. "The company is providing appropriate notification to affected patients and regulatory agencies as required by law," the report said.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A DELAWARE COUNTY man who considered himself a big deal in the online hacking community lied to a 9-1-1 dispatcher in September, claiming he was being held hostage, because he wanted to raise his status among hackers, authorities said yesterday. Michael Adams Jr., 22, of Marple, was charged with falsely reporting weapons of mass destruction, false alarms to an agency of public safety and related offenses for the Sept. 16 incident, the Delaware County District Attorney's Office announced.
NEWS
September 10, 2013 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 1,000 programmers converged over the weekend at Penn for what was billed as "the biggest university hackathon in the world. " To the public, the word hack may bring up visions of Edward Snowden and digital terrorism. But in the tech world, hack is used as a synonym for build . And "hackathons" are the programmer's version of a slumber party, science fair, and Super Bowl rolled into one. The students spent 48 hours at the Palestra, working in small teams to brainstorm, design, and build an app, website, or hardware product.
SPORTS
July 9, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
RECENTLY ACQUIRED Dallas Stars forward Tyler Seguin said an anti-gay comment that showed up on his Twitter account came from "hackers. " The Stars said in a statement yesterday that they had "addressed the issue directly" with Seguin. The tweet showed up on his account Saturday and was quickly removed. Seguin posted an apology on Twitter and said he was temporarily shutting down his account because of "repeated attempts by 'hackers' to try to damage my reputation. " Seguin, 21, was traded to Dallas by Boston last week, just days after Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli criticized the No. 2 pick in the 2010 draft as needing to be a "better pro. " Dallas made the seven-player deal because it needs centers, and Seguin figures to be on the Stars' first line.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Ellen Nakashima, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Designs for many of the nation's most sensitive advanced weapons systems have been compromised by Chinese hackers, according to a report prepared for the Pentagon and to officials from government and the defense industry. Among more than two dozen major weapons systems whose designs were breached were programs critical to U.S. missile defenses and combat aircraft and ships, according to a previously undisclosed section of a confidential report prepared by the Defense Science Board for Pentagon leaders.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Colleen Long, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A gang of cyber-criminals stole $45 million in a matter of hours by hacking their way into a database of prepaid debit cards and then fanning out around the globe to drain cash machines, federal prosecutors said Thursday. Brooklyn U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch called it "a massive 21st-century bank heist" and compared its size to the Lufthansa heist in the late 1970s immortalized in the film Goodfellas . Lynch said the fraudsters had moved with astounding speed to loot financial institutions around the world.
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