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Hadrosaurus

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NEWS
September 1, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Wanamaker's had its eagle. Margate has its elephant. And Haddonfield will have a 14-foot-long, 8-foot-tall bronze dinosaur. Hadrosaurus foulkii has long been a part of the borough's lore. In 1858, scientists discovered the prehistoric beast's nearly complete skeleton in a marl pit on what is now Maple Avenue. It was the first such dinosaur skeleton ever found, and the first fossil displayed in a museum, Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences. And now, spurred by an idea from the borough's garden club, local artist John Giannotti will craft the large sculpture to sit in the center of a garden on Lantern Lane, a pedestrian walkway in the business district.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
Several million years ago, an eight-ton lizard wandered the swamps of South Jersey, chewing on leaves and generally enjoying the surroundings. One day, it stepped into a pit of quicksand and died. Eons passed. The swamps dried. And the sand pit gave way to Haddon Township. In 1856, the lizard's bones were dug up, pronounced a hadrosaurus and used to help start the science of paleontology. Yesterday, following further evolution and a dogged campaign by some Westmont schoolchildren, additional laurels came to the hallowed skeleton.
NEWS
November 24, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was one of the first rock stars. So many people came to gawk at the long-limbed figure that handlers started charging 10 cents' admission in a vain effort to limit the crowds. By the next year, his fame would spread to far-off London, where a magazine called him "a reptilian master of the world. " It was 1868 in Philadelphia, and Hadrosaurus foulkii was the world's first dinosaur skeleton to go on public display. Last weekend, he - or perhaps she (as with some rock stars, scientists say it's hard to tell)
NEWS
January 19, 2003 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
He only grazed on plants, but his huge, scaly body and bulging eyes surely intimidated creatures who roamed in his shadow 60 million to 70 million years ago. Even the red clay model of the Hadrosaurus foulkii - looming nine feet and stretching almost 15 - is ominous. Never mind that the dinosaur model lacks teeth (it is a duckbill) and may be a tad smaller than a full-grown Hadrosaurus. John Giannotti, a Haddonfield sculptor, is just completing the first major stage of what he says will be a life-size, bronzed tribute to a famous dinosaur whose stomping ground was Haddonfield.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | By Craig McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Some experts think an ice age killed the dinosaur. Others blame it on a giant meteor. Yesterday, a new culprit emerged: the New Jersey Senate. By taking no action, the Senate killed a bill to name Hadrosaurus foulkii the official state dinosaur. The measure did not come up for a vote yesterday in the upper chamber, which met briefly for the final session of the most recent two-year legislative session. That meant extinction for the dinosaur bill, which passed the General Assembly by 54-0 on Monday.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
It may seem like a laudable idea, but lawmakers here already can see problems. For one thing, have the proponents hired a lobbyist? How about, as one politician here wondered, "a powerful, politically well-connected law firm?" "Have they taken any legislators to lunch yet?" asked Assemblyman Thomas P. Foy. "Let's get serious. " Let's not. What's stirring some small interest under the dome here these days is a bill endorsed by two South Jersey Republicans to add one more designation to join those of the state bird (Eastern goldfinch)
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Millions of years after dinosaurs mysteriously disappeared from the Earth, dinosaur bones were found in a marl pit on land owned by a Haddonfield farmer. That was 150 years ago. To commemorate the event, the Haddonfield chapter of the American Field Service brought dinosaurs back to the community Saturday in the form of a "Rollickin' Dinosaur Revue" at the Haddonfield Middle School. "That discovery put Haddonfield on the paleontology map," said Sally Dunbar Pedrick, who helped to organize the event to raise money for the 30- year-old student exchange program.
NEWS
October 15, 2003 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flag-waving schoolchildren lined the street. Shopkeepers peered out from behind doorways while the peppy mayor paced the sidewalk, smiling broadly and encouraging people to clap. It was 9:47 a.m. yesterday, and all of Haddonfield seemed to hold its breath while a one-ton bronze monster blanketed in bubble wrap slowly made its way down Kings Highway, perched on a flatbed truck and escorted by police cars and a fire engine. Hadrosaurus is a big deal in these parts. In 1858, the first nearly complete dinosaur skeleton was discovered in a marl pit on John Estaugh Hopkins' Haddonfield farm.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1986 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hadrosaurus foulkii made the commute from Pennsylvania to New Jersey before there were toll booths on the Ben Franklin Bridge or jokes like "You're from New Jersey? What exit?" In fact, when William Peter Foulke excavated the skeletal remains of the four-ton, 30-foot-long hadrosaurus ("bulky lizard") in Haddonfield in 1858, the creature had been dead for 73 million years or so. Foulke, a member of the Academy of Natural Sciences, had unearthed the first dinosaur skeleton ever found in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's the original Jersey Dude - tall and broad. Cocky walk. Liked to go down the Shore. He lived in Haddonfield - oh, 80 million years ago or so. He dropped dead in a marl pit at the east end of Maple Avenue and lay there until 1858, when Joseph Leidy, a young, wealthy scientist, made a positive ID: He called him Hadrosaurus foulkii, a duckbilled plant-eater. Thirty-five of Hadrosaurus foulkii's bones, considered the premier example of U.S. dinosaur paleontology, are kept at the Academy of Natural Sciences.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Haddonfield art teacher Hillary Johnston was much loved by students, family, and friends. A talented creator in her own right, she was gentle and strong, with a gift for nurturing children. In 2011, after years of illness, she lost her life to cancer. She is missed. Wednesday evening, she will be remembered in a manner most fitting - at the school where she taught, with the unveiling of a piece of art created in her honor. At 6:30 p.m. outside Tatem Elementary School, there will be a dedication ceremony for a bronze statue made as a memorial to Johnston by the Haddonfield artist John Giannotti.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Columnist
It was the time of P.T. Barnum, when people would line up to see a whitewashed elephant or a carefully faked petrified giant. But in 1868, a display in Philadelphia proved that reality could be far stranger than fiction. That year, the Academy of Natural Sciences showed the world its first glimpse of a real dinosaur skeleton - a 15-foot-tall Godzilla pulled from a pit in Haddonfield. The creature threatened to obliterate the traditional picture of the universe. Along with Darwin's theory and a revolution in geology, dinosaur fossils were opening the human imagination to lost worlds on our own planet, separated by vast epochs of time.
LIVING
March 5, 2010 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
The source of the items in a New Jersey online auction taking place this week is almost as unusual as the pieces themselves: a dozen lots of cretaceous-era fossils that are being sold by the woman who dug them out of the ground herself. The fossils, characterized as dinosaur bone fragments, are being offered by Alfred's Auctions Inc., of Hightstown, in an online sale accessible at www.auctionzip.com. that ends at 8 p.m. Sunday. They were consigned by Linda Passarelli, who lives in the vicinity of the Navesink River in Monmouth County.
NEWS
November 24, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was one of the first rock stars. So many people came to gawk at the long-limbed figure that handlers started charging 10 cents' admission in a vain effort to limit the crowds. By the next year, his fame would spread to far-off London, where a magazine called him "a reptilian master of the world. " It was 1868 in Philadelphia, and Hadrosaurus foulkii was the world's first dinosaur skeleton to go on public display. Last weekend, he - or perhaps she (as with some rock stars, scientists say it's hard to tell)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2008 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
The Academy of Natural Sciences will open its newest exhibit, "Hadrosaurus Foulkii: The Dinosaur That Changed the World," at 10 a.m. Saturday. The exhibit will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the scientific recognition of the Hadrosaurus foulkii, the most complete dinosaur skeleton found to that time. Discovered in Haddonfield in 1858, the fully mounted skeleton of the 23-foot-long plant-eater will be displayed at the academy for the first time since the 1930s. Three scenes will tell the story of Hadrosaurus foulkii.
NEWS
October 15, 2003 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flag-waving schoolchildren lined the street. Shopkeepers peered out from behind doorways while the peppy mayor paced the sidewalk, smiling broadly and encouraging people to clap. It was 9:47 a.m. yesterday, and all of Haddonfield seemed to hold its breath while a one-ton bronze monster blanketed in bubble wrap slowly made its way down Kings Highway, perched on a flatbed truck and escorted by police cars and a fire engine. Hadrosaurus is a big deal in these parts. In 1858, the first nearly complete dinosaur skeleton was discovered in a marl pit on John Estaugh Hopkins' Haddonfield farm.
NEWS
January 19, 2003 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
He only grazed on plants, but his huge, scaly body and bulging eyes surely intimidated creatures who roamed in his shadow 60 million to 70 million years ago. Even the red clay model of the Hadrosaurus foulkii - looming nine feet and stretching almost 15 - is ominous. Never mind that the dinosaur model lacks teeth (it is a duckbill) and may be a tad smaller than a full-grown Hadrosaurus. John Giannotti, a Haddonfield sculptor, is just completing the first major stage of what he says will be a life-size, bronzed tribute to a famous dinosaur whose stomping ground was Haddonfield.
NEWS
January 16, 2003 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anyone seeking an explanation of why so many Eagles fans are rooted in South Jersey - even in the bad years - might want to look at the soil. There, not far below the surface, you can find something folks in the 19th century called marl and mined for fertilizer. Marl as in Marlton. Marl as in the marl pit on John Hopkins' farm in Haddonfield, where the United States' first nearly complete dinosaur skeleton - Hadrosaurus foulkii - was found more than 140 years ago. It's rare stuff, and despite what folks in these parts have been calling the sediment all these years, geologists know it as greensand.
NEWS
September 1, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Wanamaker's had its eagle. Margate has its elephant. And Haddonfield will have a 14-foot-long, 8-foot-tall bronze dinosaur. Hadrosaurus foulkii has long been a part of the borough's lore. In 1858, scientists discovered the prehistoric beast's nearly complete skeleton in a marl pit on what is now Maple Avenue. It was the first such dinosaur skeleton ever found, and the first fossil displayed in a museum, Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences. And now, spurred by an idea from the borough's garden club, local artist John Giannotti will craft the large sculpture to sit in the center of a garden on Lantern Lane, a pedestrian walkway in the business district.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1999 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Say what you will about Silicon Valley or Seattle as a locus of science, but there's one hot spot that no one should ignore. When a certain inventor carbonized a filament inside a glass bulb, where was he tinkering? Or when a small team of scientists squashed silicon and germanium between plastic and called it a transistor, where were they working? Or when a dinosaur later known as Hadrosaurus foulkii dropped dead in a marl pit, only to be unearthed and studied 60 million years later, where was this?
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