FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
George Fitchett, a lifelong beautician whose motto was "I'm a beautician, not a magician," died last Friday. He was 60 and lived in West Oak Lane. He also was a part-time bartender. But it was in Alice's Beauty Salon, at 16th Street and Nedro Avenue, where Fitchett earned his reputation as a "happy-go-lucky" person. It was where he also got his nickname, "George the Beautician. " A veteran of the Korean War, Fitchett served four years in the Air Force. After his discharge in 1957, he attended a beauty culture school on the GI Bill.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
Take it from someone who once Scotch-taped her hair to her face overnight in an effort to straighten it: Trendy hairdos almost always take some doing. Take it from this voice of experience (lots and lots of experience . . . the tape job, circa 1973, was my effort to look like Laurie Partridge!): Now is an excellent time to be a teen-ager with "problem" hair. What's so great about this year, especially as opposed to last year (and, of course, 1973), is that virtually anything goes.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | By EVE ST. GIRARD
BLACK FOLKS, we've got a problem! "Dere is a whole heap a colored people who ain't got da news, SLAVERY IS OVER!" We are under siege by the hair police, the thought police, "da speech poleese," and mercy Lord, the how-to-be-black police, by Negroes who think it is their right to tell other Africans how to wear their hair etc., while important issues are ignored. Martin Luther King longed for the day when we would be "judged by the content of our character. " But it ain't just white folks doing the judging.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Primp, crimp, spray, clip, push, pull and pray. Women especially color the gray, hide the thin spots and spend oodles of money to treat damaged hair. But few cosmetic problems are as heart-wrenching as a female balding head. Mary Lou Enoches has been a hairdresser long enough to encounter clients and friends who have developed cancer or other maladies whose treatments have led to baldness. When the 25-year beauty veteran began laying out the floor plans for her new hair and body care shop, La Difference, on Market Street in West Chester, she including a special room.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1992 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Herman Allen, owner and president of Innovations Inc., works on Phyllis Vernon yesterday, during a symposium for African-American cosmetologists at the Adams Mark Hotel on City Avenue. The hair-care products presented by Ohio- based Innovations, which are sold exclusively to salon operators trained by Innovations professionals, were part of a symposium entitled "Keeping Your Business Alive in the 21st Century. "
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years - no, for centuries - man has worried about having peace in his time, food on his table, clothes on his back and love in his heart. Mostly, though, he has worried about hair on his head. He need worry no longer. First, there was the wet look. Then, the dry look. Later, the mousse look. Now, many a troubled man may rejoice. Finally, there is the thin look. Consider the heroes of our time, the men that men admire and women adore. Jack Nicholson, Bruce Willis, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and his fellow basketball player Gus Williams, Peter Jennings, Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood, Robert Duvall, Bill Murray, writer William Kennedy.
NEWS
November 28, 2008 | By Michelle Melloni
In the current economy, people are finding all kinds of ways to save a few bucks - including doing without trips to the barber. That's nothing new for me, though. I've been cutting my husband's hair for at least 12 years - since shortly after Ken and I were married. I had never cut hair before. Well, I did try trimming my friend's bangs once in middle school, but that went horribly awry. I lopped off too much of her bangs. (Despite that, we're still good friends.) After that, I never cut hair again until Ken. I'm not licensed.
NEWS
September 5, 2008
YOUR ONLINE poll the other day, asking "Do you think Sarah Palin will wear her hair up or down for the big speech tonight?" is, in a word, disgraceful. I'm sure that had Mitt Romney or Tim Pawlenty been named the vice presidential nominee, you would have been worried about the color of his tie, rather than the actual substance of the speech he was planning to present, right? Evan Davis Philadelphia IN REGARD to Mr. Andrew Dankanich's comments on the Democratic Convention: He asked, "Is this what politics is all about, the art of illusion and trickery, maybe sabotage and intimidation?"
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot of hair has been shorn in the 20 years since the rock musical Hair glorified the spirit of the hippie movement. So, in light of the Temple University revival of this tuneful paean to the flower children of the '60s, it is pertinent to ask: Is Hair still pertinent? As social statement it is not, and that is probably a good thing. The Vietnam War and the rancorous dialogue between young and old that spawned both the youth rebellion and the musical are in the past, and no one who lived through those distressing times would want to see them return.
NEWS
April 26, 1986 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
An expert hired by accused murderer Jay C. Smith said yesterday that FBI tests on a hair and rug fibers said to link the former Upper Merion High School principal to slain teacher Susan Reinert are "inconclusive and improper. " Samuel J. Golub, a hair and fiber analyst for 30 years, challenged some of the prosecution's most damaging evidence against Smith. He claimed a single brown hair found in the basement of Smith's King of Prussia home - said by an FBI agent to be "consistent" with Reinert's hair - actually was more likely Smith's hair.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 34-year-old woman who defrauded women with the ruse of a fictitious hair show to pay for plastic surgery, apartment rent, a car loan, and Walmart shopping sprees was sentenced Friday in federal court in Philadelphia to 15 months in prison. Tamira Fonville of New York, and conspirator Ricardo Falana of Philadelphia deposited fraudulent checks in banks in the Philadelphia area, prosecutors said. Fonville pleaded guilty in September to conspiracy to commit bank fraud and three counts of bank fraud.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Joan Capuzzi, For The Inquirer
Horses pull carts, jump hurdles, and carry everyone from jockeys to preteen girls. They are pretty good on their feet. So when a horse falls for no apparent reason, people notice. That's what happened three years ago to Ranger, a retired Thoroughbred racehorse living at Manor College's Jenkintown campus. "The students kept telling me that he would fall asleep suddenly and almost fall down before catching himself," said veterinarian Amy Bentz, an adjunct professor who teaches large-animal courses in Manor's Veterinary Technology Program.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In the current generation of so-called rock-star symphony orchestra conductors, Stéphane Denève definitely has the hair. Though not as wild as Gustavo Dudamel's or as glossy as Riccado Muti's, it corkscrews with such a mind of its own you're sure he didn't plan the look. He may be so preoccupied with musical matters he doesn't even notice it. Clearly, it's an accident. "This is the exact story," says the ebullient French-born principal guest conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The Delaware River delineates a national gun divide. On one side, a young mother decided her best defense against violent crime was to buy a gun - no doubt the remedy envisioned by state legislators who have sought to punish her hometown, Philadelphia, for any attempt at gun control. But carrying the weapon across the river got her weeks in jail and, but for a belated outbreak of prosecutorial restraint, years in prison with the criminals she was hoping to fend off. Gov. Christie's recent pardon of Shaneen Allen ended her ordeal a year and a half later, but not before she became a cause célèbre for gun-rights activists and a challenge to gun-control advocates.
SPORTS
March 13, 2015 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
FROM HEAD to toe, everything about DeAndre' Bembry indicates he is more style than substance. His audacious Afro transfixes everyone who sees him, on City Avenue or in a Saint Joseph's classroom or in Hagen Arena. Nearly as wide as his shoulders and cropped over his ears, it is a mushroom cloud of basketball funk, an explosion of retro chic. On his chin he grows a wispy goatee more than 2 inches long. It has never been shaved. Glance down and witness psychedelic socks. The inevitable tattoos, the predictable piercings - they all would represent his further, deep need for notice; his well of insecurity; his ache for individuality.
NEWS
February 27, 2015
EVERYTHING about Don's Barber Shop in Mount Holly, N.J., is vintage - from the 50-year-old burgundy barber chairs to the old-style cash register that's been there 40 years, to owner Don Thompson himself, who has been cutting hair there for almost six decades. "I got my first haircut there in 1979, and I started taking my son, Nicholas, 3, to Don's when he was 2 years old," said Jason Carty, 38, the fire chief of Westampton Township. "The place is a pillar of Mount Holly," he said.
NEWS
February 24, 2015
C ANDACE V. MITCHELL, 27, of West Philadelphia, is co-founder & CEO of Myavana, a North Philly startup offering personalized hair service for women of color. Users send in a hair sample for lab analysis, and Myavana recommends products based on the results. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Myavana? A: I've had issues managing my hair. I majored in computer science at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, wanted to be an entrepreneur and thought about my issues as a consumer.
NEWS
January 30, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ERNESTINE McCASKILL fancied herself something of a card shark. Pinochle was her game, and she was good at ignoring distractions to pursue her mastery of the cards, including the apparent efforts of her son-in-law, Ronald Nixon, to throw her off her game. Ronald talked incessantly to disrupt her concentration, her family said, but she would say to the other players, "Aw, just let what he's saying roll off your back. " "She could make you laugh while playing any type of game," her family said.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The majority of us spend a lot of time (and money) to get rid of gray with high-powered weapons such as the get-it-golden double process and make-it-brunette balayage. But the winds of change are coloring the most stylish of women's tresses silver. The trendlet Yes, it's true. Women are paying stylists top dollar to have their inverted, shoulder-length bobs and short spikey-dos colored a perfect gray to silver ombre. (Much like bleach blondes, the first step is to strip the pigment, and then stylists apply a permanent gray dye. You can add a semipermanent rinse for a pastel effect.)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
"I'M FROM Philly!" "Hey, went to school in Philly!" "Our agency is in Philly!" The shout-outs were plentiful to this Consumer Electronics Show attendee wearing a big "Philadelphia Daily News /philly.com" badge earlier this month in Las Vegas. And the salutations pretty much demanded that I stop, chew the fat on Philly connections and pick up on their cool gizmos at the huge confab. HOT STUFF: The smart-room-register Ecovent grabbed my gaze even before I heard that co-founders Dipul "Dip" Patel, Nick "Laus" Lancaster and Shawn "Bucky" Rose started collaborating as students at Drexel and Penn.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|