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NEWS
November 22, 1996 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
George Fitchett, a lifelong beautician whose motto was "I'm a beautician, not a magician," died last Friday. He was 60 and lived in West Oak Lane. He also was a part-time bartender. But it was in Alice's Beauty Salon, at 16th Street and Nedro Avenue, where Fitchett earned his reputation as a "happy-go-lucky" person. It was where he also got his nickname, "George the Beautician. " A veteran of the Korean War, Fitchett served four years in the Air Force. After his discharge in 1957, he attended a beauty culture school on the GI Bill.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
Take it from someone who once Scotch-taped her hair to her face overnight in an effort to straighten it: Trendy hairdos almost always take some doing. Take it from this voice of experience (lots and lots of experience . . . the tape job, circa 1973, was my effort to look like Laurie Partridge!): Now is an excellent time to be a teen-ager with "problem" hair. What's so great about this year, especially as opposed to last year (and, of course, 1973), is that virtually anything goes.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | By EVE ST. GIRARD
BLACK FOLKS, we've got a problem! "Dere is a whole heap a colored people who ain't got da news, SLAVERY IS OVER!" We are under siege by the hair police, the thought police, "da speech poleese," and mercy Lord, the how-to-be-black police, by Negroes who think it is their right to tell other Africans how to wear their hair etc., while important issues are ignored. Martin Luther King longed for the day when we would be "judged by the content of our character. " But it ain't just white folks doing the judging.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Primp, crimp, spray, clip, push, pull and pray. Women especially color the gray, hide the thin spots and spend oodles of money to treat damaged hair. But few cosmetic problems are as heart-wrenching as a female balding head. Mary Lou Enoches has been a hairdresser long enough to encounter clients and friends who have developed cancer or other maladies whose treatments have led to baldness. When the 25-year beauty veteran began laying out the floor plans for her new hair and body care shop, La Difference, on Market Street in West Chester, she including a special room.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1992 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Herman Allen, owner and president of Innovations Inc., works on Phyllis Vernon yesterday, during a symposium for African-American cosmetologists at the Adams Mark Hotel on City Avenue. The hair-care products presented by Ohio- based Innovations, which are sold exclusively to salon operators trained by Innovations professionals, were part of a symposium entitled "Keeping Your Business Alive in the 21st Century. "
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years - no, for centuries - man has worried about having peace in his time, food on his table, clothes on his back and love in his heart. Mostly, though, he has worried about hair on his head. He need worry no longer. First, there was the wet look. Then, the dry look. Later, the mousse look. Now, many a troubled man may rejoice. Finally, there is the thin look. Consider the heroes of our time, the men that men admire and women adore. Jack Nicholson, Bruce Willis, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and his fellow basketball player Gus Williams, Peter Jennings, Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood, Robert Duvall, Bill Murray, writer William Kennedy.
NEWS
November 28, 2008 | By Michelle Melloni
In the current economy, people are finding all kinds of ways to save a few bucks - including doing without trips to the barber. That's nothing new for me, though. I've been cutting my husband's hair for at least 12 years - since shortly after Ken and I were married. I had never cut hair before. Well, I did try trimming my friend's bangs once in middle school, but that went horribly awry. I lopped off too much of her bangs. (Despite that, we're still good friends.) After that, I never cut hair again until Ken. I'm not licensed.
NEWS
September 5, 2008
YOUR ONLINE poll the other day, asking "Do you think Sarah Palin will wear her hair up or down for the big speech tonight?" is, in a word, disgraceful. I'm sure that had Mitt Romney or Tim Pawlenty been named the vice presidential nominee, you would have been worried about the color of his tie, rather than the actual substance of the speech he was planning to present, right? Evan Davis Philadelphia IN REGARD to Mr. Andrew Dankanich's comments on the Democratic Convention: He asked, "Is this what politics is all about, the art of illusion and trickery, maybe sabotage and intimidation?"
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot of hair has been shorn in the 20 years since the rock musical Hair glorified the spirit of the hippie movement. So, in light of the Temple University revival of this tuneful paean to the flower children of the '60s, it is pertinent to ask: Is Hair still pertinent? As social statement it is not, and that is probably a good thing. The Vietnam War and the rancorous dialogue between young and old that spawned both the youth rebellion and the musical are in the past, and no one who lived through those distressing times would want to see them return.
NEWS
April 26, 1986 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
An expert hired by accused murderer Jay C. Smith said yesterday that FBI tests on a hair and rug fibers said to link the former Upper Merion High School principal to slain teacher Susan Reinert are "inconclusive and improper. " Samuel J. Golub, a hair and fiber analyst for 30 years, challenged some of the prosecution's most damaging evidence against Smith. He claimed a single brown hair found in the basement of Smith's King of Prussia home - said by an FBI agent to be "consistent" with Reinert's hair - actually was more likely Smith's hair.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
McLie is an intelligent, inquisitive 7-year-old with big eyes, curly brown hair, and energy to burn. Polite and eager to please, he conscientiously follows the rules, and often worries about whether he is doing the right thing. McLie, who prefers to be called Mc or Lee, has a variety of interests, including reading, soccer, robots, rainbows, chess, and computer games. He expresses his feelings well and, if he feels comfortable with you, is quite sociable. He lives in a foster home with his three siblings - McBrooklyn, McSkull, and McHazel.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | BY KIM CAMPBELL THORNTON, Universal Uclick
HAVE YOU EVER thought about how many words and phrases we use every day that come straight from the horse's mouth? Expressions that are the cat's meow? You might even say our language has gone to the dogs. Animal-related terms are delightfully descriptive. Some are built upon animal characteristics - eagle-eyed, bird-brained, dog-eared - irrespective of accuracy (birds are actually pretty darn smart). Others come to us from languages such as Greek, Latin or Icelandic. Learning about their origins is fascinating.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Cathy Rubin
My hair has always been my thing. In the same way some people have vavavoom legs or a strong chin or the bluest eyes, I have noticeable hair. And whether it's been deemed bad (as when my fourth-grade classmates called me Medusa after swim class), or oh-so-good (as when that hot guy told me he waited outside the liberal arts building just to see my hair blow in the wind), I have felt defined by it. In fact, after I had my curls chemically straightened once in high school, I fell into a funk.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Stacey Burling
I turned 60 last year. To my surprise, it wasn't quite just another birthday. Maybe it was our last gloomy winter, but I found myself in an existential crisis. I've spent a lot of time in the last few months thinking about what's going to give my life meaning in the however-many years I have left, about what I want now that the nest is empty and all that. You get the idea. I spend a lot of time thinking. I also have spent time thinking - more than any smart, independent, fairly liberated woman should - about my hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio
There are some things that should be attempted only by a professional. Would you stitch up your own wounds? Repair downed power lines after a storm? Attempt a top-speed drive on a closed course even after the car companies warned you? Of course not. So why did I think I could color my own hair? I'm going to blame it on television and magazine advertisements. Christina Hendricks, Tina Fey, Jennifer Lopez, Beyoncé - that's right, Beyoncé - have all shaken their beautifully colored manes while promoting boxed dyes that cost less than $30. "Self," I said to myself in June, "let's save money for a few months and forgo salon visits.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Tom Wilk
To some, gray is a four-letter word, a color to be fended off at all costs. To me, gray calls to mind another four-letter word: gift, as in time. In the end, it's all a matter of perspective. As a youthful-looking 23-year-old, I decided to grow a mustache in November 1979 to give myself a more adult appearance. It seemed to take weeks, but, eventually, the brown whiskers formed a solid covering, which has remained unshaven since. In the ensuing decades, brown has slowly given way to gray.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By John Quinn
We were headed toward the cobblestone roads of hilly Manayunk, after descending the steps of St. Lucy's church on Smick Street. We waved our custom-made towels - "HITCHED" - and finished the set of impromptu photos before finding the parking lot. The trolley was there for the wedding party. Next stop, the Conshohocken Marriott. The reception wasn't for another two hours but Amy Zurzola Quinn and I were on deadline, apropos for the betrothal of two journalists. We were ready for our close-ups, Mr. DeMille.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016
"To go gray or to dye is a simple decision for me. In the Book of Proverbs, Solomon says, 'A gray head is a crown of glory.' There is no way I have earned mine yet, so I'll dye it until I do. Maggie Beck , Riverton "I am a 691/2-year-old wife, mother, grandmother. While standing in line at Acme's deli, there was a little girl with her dad - a really serious interaction here. Her dad told me his little girl had never seen a real, live princess, and could I say hello? Yep: me, with my long silver tresses in a braid.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Q: My cat seems to be losing a lot of hair. He even has a couple of bald patches. What is the problem? - via Facebook A: It's normal for cats to shed, of course. Hairs grow and then fall out on a regular basis, adorning our "fur-niture" (that's why they call it that), floors and clothing. Sometimes cats spontaneously lose a lot of hair when they are nervous or afraid. Stress activates their arrector pili muscles, attached to the hair follicles, causing the cats to suddenly lose hairs that have been in the resting phase of the hair growth cycle.
NEWS
December 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Staff Writer
THE WAITES family of West Philadelphia never thought of Loreen Jones as anything but a treasured member of the family, even if she was a foster kid. "Loreen joined the Waites family circle when she was 14 months old," said Jean Waites-Howard, who was 14 years old when Loreen arrived. "She was the beloved baby of the family. " Jean more or less adopted her "baby sister," taking her everywhere, the baby propped on her hip. And Jean's mother, Bessie Waites, was no less attentive.
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