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NEWS
October 17, 2014
LAST WEEK, an editor showed me a death notice in our paper for John McGee. Such listings are paid for by funeral homes based on information submitted by the family. In this one, the family included the man's nickname - "Jewboy. " That grabbed me, but maybe not for the reason the editor thought. I'm Jewish, but rather than take offense, I was overwhelmed by curiosity. How did this Irish guy get that nickname? When I was a kid, nicknames often focused on physical traits - Shorty, Fatty, Lefty - or personality traits - Tough Tony, Killer.
NEWS
November 22, 1996 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
George Fitchett, a lifelong beautician whose motto was "I'm a beautician, not a magician," died last Friday. He was 60 and lived in West Oak Lane. He also was a part-time bartender. But it was in Alice's Beauty Salon, at 16th Street and Nedro Avenue, where Fitchett earned his reputation as a "happy-go-lucky" person. It was where he also got his nickname, "George the Beautician. " A veteran of the Korean War, Fitchett served four years in the Air Force. After his discharge in 1957, he attended a beauty culture school on the GI Bill.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | by Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer
Take it from someone who once Scotch-taped her hair to her face overnight in an effort to straighten it: Trendy hairdos almost always take some doing. Take it from this voice of experience (lots and lots of experience . . . the tape job, circa 1973, was my effort to look like Laurie Partridge!): Now is an excellent time to be a teen-ager with "problem" hair. What's so great about this year, especially as opposed to last year (and, of course, 1973), is that virtually anything goes.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | By EVE ST. GIRARD
BLACK FOLKS, we've got a problem! "Dere is a whole heap a colored people who ain't got da news, SLAVERY IS OVER!" We are under siege by the hair police, the thought police, "da speech poleese," and mercy Lord, the how-to-be-black police, by Negroes who think it is their right to tell other Africans how to wear their hair etc., while important issues are ignored. Martin Luther King longed for the day when we would be "judged by the content of our character. " But it ain't just white folks doing the judging.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Primp, crimp, spray, clip, push, pull and pray. Women especially color the gray, hide the thin spots and spend oodles of money to treat damaged hair. But few cosmetic problems are as heart-wrenching as a female balding head. Mary Lou Enoches has been a hairdresser long enough to encounter clients and friends who have developed cancer or other maladies whose treatments have led to baldness. When the 25-year beauty veteran began laying out the floor plans for her new hair and body care shop, La Difference, on Market Street in West Chester, she including a special room.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1992 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
Herman Allen, owner and president of Innovations Inc., works on Phyllis Vernon yesterday, during a symposium for African-American cosmetologists at the Adams Mark Hotel on City Avenue. The hair-care products presented by Ohio- based Innovations, which are sold exclusively to salon operators trained by Innovations professionals, were part of a symposium entitled "Keeping Your Business Alive in the 21st Century. "
NEWS
July 12, 1986 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years - no, for centuries - man has worried about having peace in his time, food on his table, clothes on his back and love in his heart. Mostly, though, he has worried about hair on his head. He need worry no longer. First, there was the wet look. Then, the dry look. Later, the mousse look. Now, many a troubled man may rejoice. Finally, there is the thin look. Consider the heroes of our time, the men that men admire and women adore. Jack Nicholson, Bruce Willis, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and his fellow basketball player Gus Williams, Peter Jennings, Woody Allen, Clint Eastwood, Robert Duvall, Bill Murray, writer William Kennedy.
NEWS
November 28, 2008 | By Michelle Melloni
In the current economy, people are finding all kinds of ways to save a few bucks - including doing without trips to the barber. That's nothing new for me, though. I've been cutting my husband's hair for at least 12 years - since shortly after Ken and I were married. I had never cut hair before. Well, I did try trimming my friend's bangs once in middle school, but that went horribly awry. I lopped off too much of her bangs. (Despite that, we're still good friends.) After that, I never cut hair again until Ken. I'm not licensed.
NEWS
September 5, 2008
YOUR ONLINE poll the other day, asking "Do you think Sarah Palin will wear her hair up or down for the big speech tonight?" is, in a word, disgraceful. I'm sure that had Mitt Romney or Tim Pawlenty been named the vice presidential nominee, you would have been worried about the color of his tie, rather than the actual substance of the speech he was planning to present, right? Evan Davis Philadelphia IN REGARD to Mr. Andrew Dankanich's comments on the Democratic Convention: He asked, "Is this what politics is all about, the art of illusion and trickery, maybe sabotage and intimidation?"
NEWS
November 30, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lot of hair has been shorn in the 20 years since the rock musical Hair glorified the spirit of the hippie movement. So, in light of the Temple University revival of this tuneful paean to the flower children of the '60s, it is pertinent to ask: Is Hair still pertinent? As social statement it is not, and that is probably a good thing. The Vietnam War and the rancorous dialogue between young and old that spawned both the youth rebellion and the musical are in the past, and no one who lived through those distressing times would want to see them return.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 17, 2014
LAST WEEK, an editor showed me a death notice in our paper for John McGee. Such listings are paid for by funeral homes based on information submitted by the family. In this one, the family included the man's nickname - "Jewboy. " That grabbed me, but maybe not for the reason the editor thought. I'm Jewish, but rather than take offense, I was overwhelmed by curiosity. How did this Irish guy get that nickname? When I was a kid, nicknames often focused on physical traits - Shorty, Fatty, Lefty - or personality traits - Tough Tony, Killer.
SPORTS
October 10, 2014 | By Avery Maehrer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Her black hair tie was missing, and Sophia Tornetta panicked. Before a game earlier this fall, the Agnes Irwin senior forward couldn't find her signature accessory and good-luck charm that has become a constant throughout her field hockey career. Her teammates noticed the problem. So did coach Alison Brant, who improvised by pulling out her own tie and coaching the Owls with her hair down for the rest of the game. Tornetta can't explain how or why the practice began, but ever since her arrival at the school in 2011, she has continued it. "I don't know if it's a superstition, but it kind of is," Tornetta said.
NEWS
September 5, 2014
Y OLANDA Keels-Walker, 32, of West Philadelphia, owns Suite Extensions hair salons in Germantown and Norfolk, Va. She also owns Pink Label Beauty, a line of hair-care products. Keels-Walker, a divorced mother of two young girls, grew up in Virginia. She worked as a contract negotiator for the CIA in Langley, Va., for four years. She's also a recent Daily News Sexy Single. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: I read in Entrepreneur about Drybar and their blow-dry concept and thought, "How can I transform this into something for African-Americans?"
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Lydia O'Neal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police are searching for a pink-haired, heavy-set woman and a thin man with a reddish beard who allegedly shot a 23-year-old woman in Northeast Philadelphia Wednesday afternoon. The victim, who is in critical condition at Aria-Torresdale Hospital, was shot five times around 3 p.m. while visiting friends at an apartment complex in the 9900 block of Haldeman Ave., police said. The two suspects fled the building, heading north. The victim, who's name has not been released, was taken by a friend to a nearby police station, then rushed to the hospital.
NEWS
April 29, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nick Berardi's hair salon is seven blocks and a world away from the homeless shelter in a church basement on Broad Street, just a block north of City Hall. Every week, Berardi and his stylists handle more than 400 customers. Clients pay top dollar for cuts or color, with an average bill of $100. For Clarence Briscoe, 71, home is a cot at the Arch Street United Methodist Church. He'd still have an apartment in Northeast Philadelphia if he had not lost a $200-a-month rent subsidy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Face it. Beards are everywhere - and we're not talking about a little stubble. More guys are wearing full-out fuzzy beards and mustaches - scruffy and dense like bracken, or elegantly coiffed and pointed like topiary - and the evidence of facial fawning grows. Manhattan's International Beauty Show this month hosted as many bearded models and clipper demonstrations as it did colorists and tall coifs. Cosmetic surgeons such as Ardmore's Rumer Cosmetic Surgery offer facial hair transplants (for $3,000)
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
AS DEANDRÉ BEMBRY seized the inbounds pass, he felt the left arm of Treveon Graham all over his left shoulder. A spin to his right and a mere dribble shed the VCU standout and presented Bembry an avenue to the rim. The 6-6, 250-pound Mo Alie-Cox slid 10 feet to his left and leapt, but all it got him was on the unfortunate side of a vicious dunk. Sitting in the 11th row of Section 105 at Brooklyn's Barclays Center, Chris Chavannes saw the play develop. He had, after all, witnessed plays like it so many times before, in games, practices and open gym sessions.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Katie Anne Castaldi, 31, of Sadsburyville, a stylist and image consultant who helped clients at a Jeffersonville hair salon show the world their best faces, died Tuesday, March 4, of injuries suffered in an auto accident on the Route 30 Bypass in Caln Township. Her car veered off the roadway just after 9 a.m. and struck a bridge abutment. Pennsylvania state police were seeking to learn the cause of the accident, which occurred the day after a snowfall. With honey-colored shoulder-length hair, green eyes, and a sprinkling of freckles, Ms. Castaldi was movie-star beautiful.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT WAS JUST like Jack Thompson to think of plucking a hair from the tail of a tiger. Well, he didn't pluck it himself. He got a keeper at the Philadelphia Zoo to do the plucking by holding a piece of meat in one hand and grabbing the hair with the other. "It was a great thing," said Jack's wife, Mary Pat Timony. "He was jumping up and down. " What, you might well ask, did Jack Thompson want with the hair of a tiger? He was working as the advertising manager for a company called Nuclide Industries, which made mass spectrometers - used to "determine the elemental signature of a sample," as it is described - like the hair of a tiger.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE HUNGER Games" is just sci-fi, set in a future we'll probably never see. Right? No decent society would allow its leaders to throw working-class teens into a deadly meat-grinder in order to create an authoritarian public spectacle designed to keep the rabble in line. Keep telling yourself that as you watch the hair-raising documentary "Kids for Cash," based on the notorious case of Luzerne County judges convicted of sending juveniles to a new for-profit prison that they endorsed building and whose developer paid them under the table.
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