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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012
DEAR ABBY: My husband wears a hairpiece. Unfortunately, it doesn't look very real. Nearly every time we are in a public place, I notice somebody staring or laughing at it. I have talked with him about it, but each time he tells me how attached he is to it and how good it feels on his head. I want him to be happy, but I do not want him to be publicly ridiculed. Should I throw it away? - Wife of a Man with a "Secret" DEAR WIFE: Absolutely not. If you want to help your husband, start talking with some hairstylists.
NEWS
November 2, 2005 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To wear a bad toupee is to risk ridicule, a plight that has nothing to do with class, race, fame or fortune. Men can spend thousands on custom-made hairpieces and end up looking just as unconvincing as the poor schmoes who pay $50 for a hunk of cheap synthetic fur off the shelf. The roster of impostor-heads is long and impressive. Former U.S. Rep. James Traficant (D., Ohio), and sportscaster Marv Albert will go down in history for their astonishingly lifelike toupees.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bald men have been given a bit more time to get hairpieces sewn into their scalps before the state decides whether to ban the procedure as too dangerous. On Tuesday, the state Board of Medical Examiners banned the so-called "cosmetic suture process" - in which a hairpiece is fastened to sutures that have been stitched into a person's scalp - after dozens of consumers complained that it resulted in infections, permanent scarring and bleeding. But yesterday, the board decided to hold off on implementing the ban for 30 days to give a Cinnaminson company a chance to comment on the new regulation.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
WITH ONE FELL SWOOP, HE'S SONNY NON GRATA A man who began snatching handbags to finance his drug addiction robbed his own mother by mistake, police in Italy's southeastern port of Bari said yesterday. They said the woman, who was walking along the street when her son sped past on a motorcycle and snatched her bag, was so angry that she immediately reported him to the police. He was later arrested. "We were rather surprised by the whole episode, I must admit," said a police spokesman.
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abused by her husband, fearing threats against her children, Margarita Garabito told a Philadelphia jury Tuesday that she begged her 10-year-old stepdaughter to tell her teachers about the physical abuse that would result in her death. "I did tell her. I told her to save herself," Garabito, 48, responded to a question from Assistant District Attorney Andrew Notaristefano. Notaristefano seemed stunned by the answer: "So you told a 10-year-old girl to save herself, but you couldn't do it?"
NEWS
November 20, 1993 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It wasn't quite the story of the Bobbitts, but the cuts discussed yesterday in Burlington County Superior Court were almost as embarrassing to the male ego. At issue were the practices of International Cosmetics Laboratories Inc., a Cinnaminson hair-replacement company. The firm has drawn numerous complaints of fraud and misrepresentation in the last decade from clients, with some citing intense pain and permanent scarring of their scalps. According to the state attorney general and the Division of Consumer Affairs, which filed a lawsuit on behalf of 57 customers, ICL drew clients from around the world with the promise of a full head of hair for between $1,500 and $6,500.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
David Letterman ended his 11 1/2-year tenure as host of NBC's "Late Night" last night. His surprise guest was Bruce Springsteen, the last of an estimated 6,000 guests. Letterman is going to CBS, where he will collect a $14 million annual paycheck for his new talk show, "Late Show with David Letterman. " With a weeknight start time of 11:35 p.m. (EDT), it premieres Aug. 30. Last night's show concluded with a warm farewell from Letterman, who told his viewers, "You have my thanks and my friendship.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Malone," the latest Burt Reynolds one-word-title disaster ("Heat" was the one before), is distinguished by the strange curls in Reynolds' hairpiece, the uncomfortable-looking tightness of his jeans and the incessant music on the soundtrack. Hardly a minute of the film is unaccompanied by unpleasant hums, bleats and beats, an unsuccessful attempt to cover up the lack of drama and suspense on the screen. For composer David Newman's sake, I hope he was paid by the note. The plot, a throwback to "Seven Days in May" and other paranoid thrillers of the '60s and '70s, pits Reynolds, as Richard Malone, a disaffected CIA agent, against a right-wing militaristic "covenant" led by Charles Delaney (Cliff Robertson, who gives Reynolds a good run for his money in the battle of the celebrity rasps, not to mention the battle of the celebrity hairpieces)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Malone," an action drama starring Burt Reynolds, Lauren Hutton, Cliff Robertson and Kenneth McMillan. Directed by Harley Cokliss. Screenplay by Christopher Frank. Running time: 92 minutes. An Orion release. At area theaters. 'Malone," the latest Burt Reynolds one-word-title disaster ("Heat" was the one before), is distinguished by the strange curls in Reynolds' hairpiece, the uncomfortable-looking tightness of his jeans and the incessant music on the soundtrack. Hardly a minute of the film is unaccompanied by unpleasant hums, bleats and beats, an unsuccessful attempt to cover up the lack of drama and suspense on the screen.
LIVING
July 2, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was billed as a soiree for "the hip and eccentric. " And there were plenty of both at the Warhol Pop Party thrown by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts on June 23. Part of the Academy's effort to publicize the exhibit "Andy Warhol: Social Observer," the party also aimed to sweep the cobwebs from its old-fogey reputation and draw the "now" crowd. Helping to lure the tattooed scenesters was the cachet of the event's promoters, Gyro Worldwide, the too-hip Philadelphia ad agency, and its wacky Old City store/gallery, G-Mart.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abused by her husband, fearing threats against her children, Margarita Garabito told a Philadelphia jury Tuesday that she begged her 10-year-old stepdaughter to tell her teachers about the physical abuse that would result in her death. "I did tell her. I told her to save herself," Garabito, 48, responded to a question from Assistant District Attorney Andrew Notaristefano. Notaristefano seemed stunned by the answer: "So you told a 10-year-old girl to save herself, but you couldn't do it?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012
DEAR ABBY: My husband wears a hairpiece. Unfortunately, it doesn't look very real. Nearly every time we are in a public place, I notice somebody staring or laughing at it. I have talked with him about it, but each time he tells me how attached he is to it and how good it feels on his head. I want him to be happy, but I do not want him to be publicly ridiculed. Should I throw it away? - Wife of a Man with a "Secret" DEAR WIFE: Absolutely not. If you want to help your husband, start talking with some hairstylists.
NEWS
November 2, 2005 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To wear a bad toupee is to risk ridicule, a plight that has nothing to do with class, race, fame or fortune. Men can spend thousands on custom-made hairpieces and end up looking just as unconvincing as the poor schmoes who pay $50 for a hunk of cheap synthetic fur off the shelf. The roster of impostor-heads is long and impressive. Former U.S. Rep. James Traficant (D., Ohio), and sportscaster Marv Albert will go down in history for their astonishingly lifelike toupees.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | By Kelly Wolfe, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Suzanne Kratz, a sophomore at Conestoga High School, sat nervously in the barber's chair with her long, straight brown hair in several small ponytails all over her head. Last year, growing out her hair to donate to charity sounded like a great idea. Yesterday afternoon, she was having second thoughts. In the end, charity prevailed. "I had been wearing it pretty long," Kratz said. "My boyfriend almost cried when I told him I was cutting it. " Kratz was one of more than 35 Conestoga High School students who had their hair chopped off yesterday to donate to a Florida-based charity called Locks of Love.
LIVING
July 2, 2000 | By Eils Lotozo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was billed as a soiree for "the hip and eccentric. " And there were plenty of both at the Warhol Pop Party thrown by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts on June 23. Part of the Academy's effort to publicize the exhibit "Andy Warhol: Social Observer," the party also aimed to sweep the cobwebs from its old-fogey reputation and draw the "now" crowd. Helping to lure the tattooed scenesters was the cachet of the event's promoters, Gyro Worldwide, the too-hip Philadelphia ad agency, and its wacky Old City store/gallery, G-Mart.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
WITH ONE FELL SWOOP, HE'S SONNY NON GRATA A man who began snatching handbags to finance his drug addiction robbed his own mother by mistake, police in Italy's southeastern port of Bari said yesterday. They said the woman, who was walking along the street when her son sped past on a motorcycle and snatched her bag, was so angry that she immediately reported him to the police. He was later arrested. "We were rather surprised by the whole episode, I must admit," said a police spokesman.
NEWS
April 5, 1995 | BY RICK SELVIN The New York Times and the Los Angeles Daily News contributed to this report
DON'T BREATHE DEEPLY: If you're driving home and the gridlock is so bad you've already made it to this page, take heart. At least you're not breathing SEPTA bus fumes. That's the good news. The bad news is that the pollution will get worse once you finally make it through the front door of your domicile. Yes, those who know about indoor pollution tell us that now there are more than 2,000 contaminants in typical household air. Space limitations, thank goodness, preclude us from listing them here, so we'll simply pass one suggestion along.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bald men have been given a bit more time to get hairpieces sewn into their scalps before the state decides whether to ban the procedure as too dangerous. On Tuesday, the state Board of Medical Examiners banned the so-called "cosmetic suture process" - in which a hairpiece is fastened to sutures that have been stitched into a person's scalp - after dozens of consumers complained that it resulted in infections, permanent scarring and bleeding. But yesterday, the board decided to hold off on implementing the ban for 30 days to give a Cinnaminson company a chance to comment on the new regulation.
NEWS
November 20, 1993 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It wasn't quite the story of the Bobbitts, but the cuts discussed yesterday in Burlington County Superior Court were almost as embarrassing to the male ego. At issue were the practices of International Cosmetics Laboratories Inc., a Cinnaminson hair-replacement company. The firm has drawn numerous complaints of fraud and misrepresentation in the last decade from clients, with some citing intense pain and permanent scarring of their scalps. According to the state attorney general and the Division of Consumer Affairs, which filed a lawsuit on behalf of 57 customers, ICL drew clients from around the world with the promise of a full head of hair for between $1,500 and $6,500.
NEWS
June 26, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
David Letterman ended his 11 1/2-year tenure as host of NBC's "Late Night" last night. His surprise guest was Bruce Springsteen, the last of an estimated 6,000 guests. Letterman is going to CBS, where he will collect a $14 million annual paycheck for his new talk show, "Late Show with David Letterman. " With a weeknight start time of 11:35 p.m. (EDT), it premieres Aug. 30. Last night's show concluded with a warm farewell from Letterman, who told his viewers, "You have my thanks and my friendship.
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