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NEWS
February 4, 2010
The Philadelphia region can be proud of local efforts to aid survivors of the earthquake in Haiti, work that will go on for months. Cooper University Hospital in Camden, for example, sent a team of 18 doctors, nurses, and technicians who treated victims there for nearly two weeks. The hospital and the Norcross Foundation paid for transportation, medical supplies, and personnel. Within days of its arrival, the team, led by Anthony Mazzarelli, an emergency-room physician, had transformed an orphanage into a makeshift hospital with five operating rooms.
NEWS
October 14, 1993
Those who don't remember the past may be condemned to repeat it. But those who draw strained analogies to past events may be condemned to make new and different mistakes. The army-backed thugs who wouldn't allow U.S. and Canadian troops to land in Haiti earlier this week apparently think they can take advantage of horror and concern over the deaths of U.S. soldiers in Somalia by getting Americans to equate the two situations. They may be right. The armed toughs who harassed American officials and kept the USS Harlan County from landing shouted they would do the same to Americans as Somali rebels did. Those were the magic words, apparently.
NEWS
February 1, 2010
I FOUND Cheryl Gilbert's letter on aid to Haiti to be reprehensible. Shame on anyone who doesn't feel enough compassion for her fellow human beings to not want to help people hit by an epic disaster. Children by the thousands were left orphaned, bodies are being dumped into mass graves, thousands are starving while waiting for help. As an African-American, I view Hurricane Katrina and Haiti as a single event that happened to my people, and as a man of modest means, I still gave to both causes.
NEWS
February 2, 2010
THANK goodness 90 percent of the population does not have the cold, cold heart of letter-writer Cheryl Gilbert. The U.S. has the greatest resources in the world and has always come to the aid of the unfortunate. When devastation strikes, like the earthquake that hit Haiti, it's our moral obligation to help. When you have a loaf of bread and someone hasn't eaten in a week, can't you just let them have just a slice or two? Ms. Gilbert says she won't give to the relief effort of Haiti.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Jacqueline Charles, McClatchy Newspapers
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Fourteen-day-old Alexandro Joseph has never been seen by a doctor and 7-month-old Lovemika Belzi has suffered from diarrhea since the day she was born. In the sprawling camps that continue to dot this broken capital after last year's devastating earthquake, health and human-rights officials warn of another crisis: a population explosion of tent babies. "The camps are not an appropriate place for delivery and not for a newborn," said Olivia Gayraud, health and nutrition manager for Save the Children's Port-au-Prince field office, which works with pregnant women in five camps.
NEWS
September 27, 1994 | By DANIEL SNEIDER
Russian President Boris Yeltsin's visit to the United States to address the United Nations and confer with President Clinton has been almost totally lost amid official Washington's preoccupation with Haiti. Given his predilection to hold center stage, Yeltsin might be expected to feel less than happy by this turn of events. But from a Russian point of view, the timing of his visit could not be better. However unintended, the U.S. intervention in Haiti lends considerable support to Russia's insistence on preeminence in the region of the former Soviet Union.
NEWS
October 14, 2012
Harris Steinberg is executive director of PennPraxis, School of Design at the University of Pennsylvania As a specialist in civic engagement, urban planning, and creating partnerships, I was invited to Haiti by the State Department to lead workshops with local cultural, arts, academic, and nonprofit groups on using civic engagement as a springboard for action. I approached the assignment with a healthy dose of skepticism and a dash of trepidation. After all, how could a few days on the ground in a country without civil society as we know it make any sense of civic engagement?
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Trenton Daniel, Associated Press
LA VISITE NATIONAL PARK, Haiti - The police officers and other officials showed up in the mountain clearing on a cool morning armed with shotguns, pistols, sledgehammers, and orders for hundreds of squatters to vacate the homes and farms they had carved out of one of Haiti's few national parks. The people living there had known they could be removed at any time because they were on a rare piece of protected woodland in one of the most deforested countries on earth. But they were resolved to put up a fight.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | By William F. Buckley Jr
Roger Allan Moore, with a sizable delegation, was dispatched by the State Department to Haiti with the mandate to report back to the government whether the election on Sunday had been fair. This is a fairly recent tradition: the political version of what in arms control lingo we call "verification. " An example was the delegation sent to Saigon in 1971 to depose that the election of President Thieu had been fair. Memory is vague about the exact report of that commission, but not about the report of one of its members, a Harvard professor.
NEWS
March 3, 1986 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Soon after dawn on Feb. 7, Todd Scott knew he was going to get more experience than he had bargained for in taking a six-week hotel-management internship in Haiti. Scott and Jerry Perry, a fellow cadet at the Valley Forge Military Academy, dressed quickly and ventured into the streets of Petionville, a suburb of the capital of Port-au-Prince. Word was spreading that President Jean-Claude Duvalier had fled the country. In the four days that followed, Scott, 20, of Pottstown, and Perry, 21, who is from Haiti, said they had seen people celebrate freedom and commit murder.
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SPORTS
October 6, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - It was the late morning of Sept. 27, and three bulletproof sport utility vehicles pulled into Gymnasium Vincent's gated parking lot. Nerlens Noel, the 76ers' rookie power forward, unfolded his 6-foot-11, 217-pound frame out of one of the vehicles and into the path of several awaiting fans. "Hey, Nerlens, welcome to Haiti," said Ezekiel D. Petion, one of the first to greet Noel and his contingent. "This is my son. He's going to be a future NBA player. " Noel smiled, shook the little boy's hand, and responded: "Yeah, I can see it in him. " At that moment, several children standing on the court outside the gym began faint chants of "Nerlens, Nerlens, Nerlens.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Frandy Jean moved to the United States two years ago from Haiti, Brother Daoud Bey was one of the first people to help him connect to and integrate into the South Jersey artist community. Now, with his own gallery in Haddon Heights that he opened to give young people the chance to show their art, Jean, 25, hopes to help Bey, 45, who is now in the hospital. "He gave me a lot of opportunities to work with the Camden County Arts," said Jean, who is helping to organize a July 10 fund-raiser.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
On May 6, 2010, a 15-year-old boy named Oriel died of diphtheria in Haiti. Normally, the world would not have noticed. But the boy was living in a refugee camp managed by the actor Sean Penn. With the listless teenager in his sinewy arms, Penn had spent hours, rushing from hospital to hospital in the capital of Port-au-Prince, searching for the antitoxin that would save Oriel's life. It was found too late. Shortly after the boy was taken off life support, Penn appeared on CNN, expressing outrage about the many factors that led to his death.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
BELLE GLADE, Fla. - Anything can go wrong in a blueberry harvest. The season is short - six to eight weeks in midsummer - and a freak July hailstorm can ruin a crop in 15 minutes. The stakes are high - blueberries are New Jersey's biggest crop, worth $80.8 million, more than double corn and tomatoes. It's a staffing nightmare. To pick New Jersey's 7,500 acres of blueberries, thousands of workers are needed for six intense weeks. Then it's over. This is the story of one set of farmworkers - Haitian immigrants who live in poverty in South Florida - and one New Jersey blueberry farmer, and how their lives came to intersect, reflecting historic patterns and ebbs and flows in the economy.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Olivia Wilde writes on Haiti Olivia Wilde , who stars as a suburban sex kitten in Better Living Through Chemistry , writes eloquently in Darling magazine about her volunteer work in Haiti, which had her burying victims with pal Babs Burchfield . "We were aware of the unlikelihood of the moment - two white American girls working to bag bodies in a morgue - but this was Haiti, and we had come to expect the darkly unexpected," Wilde,...
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHEN Ricardeau Scutt immigrated to Philadelphia from Haiti in 2000, he came for one reason - to work - even though he'd never had a job. "There are no jobs in Haiti," Scutt said. "A job there is like winning the lottery. " Scutt's father worked as a taxi driver in Philadelphia to send money back to his family in Haiti. He brought Ricardeau, then 20, over to do the same. But Ricardeau Scutt spoke very little English and for three months nobody would hire him. One day while driving his taxi, Scutt's dad told a passenger about the difficulty his son was having.
SPORTS
November 21, 2013 | BY JOHN MURROW, Daily News Staff Writer murrowj@phillynews.com
SOMETIMES, we need a reminder there is more to life than football and immersing yourself in the game as a fan, coach or player. This is a lesson Eagles backup quarterback Matt Barkley learned at a young age. And a lesson his father hasn't stopped teaching. The latest evidence of this can be found on Barkley's Twitter account, where yesterday he tweeted a photo of his father in Tacloban, Philippines, with devastation left by Typhoon Haiyan in the background. The tweet read: "Please keep my dad in your prayers as he brings aid and helps those in the Philippines recover from typhoon #Haiyan.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Typhoon Haiyan, one of the largest storms ever recorded, hit the Philippines Nov. 7, killing thousands and displacing more than 600,000. The full toll is not yet known, communications and access routes are far from restored, and aid has been slow to reach stranded, isolated victims. Could this be an opportunity for what some call the "new philanthropy"? A moment in particular for the millennial generation (born after 1982) to take leadership? Digital has changed the face of philanthropy - for both aid groups (which craft the call)
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kristen Hertzog and her backers have already shown that a tiny nonprofit based in Pennsylvania's Amish country can change the job prospects of impoverished Haitians. Haitian Connection Network, founded by Hertzog in 2010 and headquartered at her home in Ephrata, provides tuition-free online courses in computer science and business administration in Haiti. On Wednesday, Hertzog announced a big step forward for the cyberschool. It will join forces with Life Connection Mission, a nonprofit based in Germantown, Md., that provides 500 Haitian students with primary and secondary schooling, a medical clinic, and social services.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
B ILL GLAAB, 29, and Courtney Apple, 27, a married couple living in Washington Square West, founded Hand in Hand Soap in 2011 in Fishtown. The company's bar soap is sold in 225 stores in North America and Europe, the biggest retailer being Anthropologie. To date, Hand in Hand says, 65,000 bars of soap have been donated to children in Haiti. Apple, an Ardmore native, oversees marketing; Jersey native Glaab handles finances. I spoke with Apple. Q: How did you come up with the idea for Hand in Hand?
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