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Haitian People

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NEWS
August 12, 1994 | by Joanne Landy, New York Times
It is an illusion to believe that a U.S. invasion of Haiti could restore genuine democracy there. What happens after the Marines depose Haiti's brutal military rulers? Washington would probably sanction the return of exiled President Jean- Bertrand Aristide, but - judging by past U.S. policy in Haiti - would not help realize the hopes of the overwhelming number of Haitians who voted for him in 1990. If the United States invades, either on its own or with an assortment of countries recruited to lend an appearance of multilateralism, it is unlikely the Haitian people will regain control of their government.
NEWS
October 17, 1994 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Just back from the trip to return Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power, Philadelphia Congressman Tom Foglietta went to the Liberty Bell last night to proclaim a victory for the Haitian people. "It was a wonderful day for America. It was a wonderful day for Haiti and the Haitian people, and it was a great day for democracy," Foglietta said at a news conference in front of the Liberty Bell Pavilion on Arch Street near 6th. Foglietta said his trip to Haiti as part of the delegation of American officials and Haitian leaders and supporters who accompanied Aristide was his third trip to the island nation in the past year.
NEWS
January 8, 1993
In an effort to make a smooth transition on a volatile issue, President Bush and President-elect Clinton took the unusual step Wednesday of making a joint statement on Haiti. They said they "share the goal of restoring democracy to Haiti, safeguarding human rights of all Haitians on the island and helping the parties find a lasting solution that will end Haiti's suffering and attain new support for Haiti's economy and people. " The joint statement urges ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to compromise with the thugs who overturned his government, both to restore peace and bring an end to the anarchy and repression that have again made Haiti hell on earth.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | by James L. Oberstar, New York Times
I lived in Haiti for 3 1/2 years. I went there in 1959, fresh from graduate studies at the College of Europe, working under contract to the U.S. Navy to teach French to its mission in Port-au-Prince and as a volunteer teaching English in schools at various levels. I came to love Haiti and its people, and traveled all through the country. I believe that economic sanctions will not result in the timely departure of Haiti's illegitimate government. Quick military intervention is the only way to restore law, order and constitutional government to the beleaguered nation.
NEWS
July 5, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
President Clinton said yesterday that the United States would back "to the fullest" an agreement to return deposed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power in Haiti, and that he believed the move could be accomplished peacefully. The President telephoned congratulations to Aristide and hailed the U.N.-brokered accord to return him to power as "an historic moment for the Haitian people, for the hemisphere and for the principle of democratic rule. " Aristide and Gen. Raoul Cedras, who led the coup that ousted Aristide in September 1991, signed the agreement late Saturday.
NEWS
February 12, 1988
Haiti's new president was sworn in this week, and the United States must now decide how to deal with him. He is a paradox, an urbane, multilingual former professor of political science who claims he has been "democratically elected" despite the massive election fraud, violence and voter boycotts that ushered him into office. Secretary of State George P. Shultz said last week that, although the election was not truly democratic, he was "impressed" with Leslie Manegat's credentials.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | By Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gerard Alphonse Ferere has been calling Haiti for days with no luck. His brother-in-law is there. The phone lines don't seem to work. Ferere is worried. "People are being shot indiscriminately. On the street, in the wrong place at the wrong time," says Ferere, a Willow Grove resident who is president of the local Coalition for Haitian Concerns. Ferere, who teaches linguistics and language at St. Joseph's University, will speak out on "how Haiti has been abandoned by the world" at 7 p.m. tomorrow at the Calvary United Methodist Church, 48th Street and Baltimore Avenue.
NEWS
December 1, 1987
Haiti's downtrodden people deserved so much better. The country's first free presidential elections in 30 years, on Sunday, were suspended after armed gangs shot and hacked to death dozens of voters and destroyed polling places, churches and radio stations. The killers were supporters of ousted dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier, and members of Haiti's army. The army-dominated government stood by, let the violence happen, and then disbanded the civilian election council that had bravely tried to organize the balloting.
NEWS
January 22, 2011
Former dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier should have never returned to Haiti. But since he did, he should be tried for his murderous regime's killings and robbery of the state treasury. Duvalier showed up unexpectedly Sunday in Haiti after secretly departing France, where he has been in exile since 1986. Neither the French nor U.S. governments knew of Duvalier's travel plans. Haitian officials initially did not know how to react, but police Tuesday took Duvalier from his hotel for questioning.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Late Friday, as Haitian candidates were winding down their ragtag campaigns for a host of parliamentary and local offices, an American organization was busy working the hotel lobbies here in a different kind of campaign. A representative of the International Republican Institute (IRI), a private organization with ties to the U.S. Republican Party, was lining up American reporters for a news conference the next day, where a slick 300-page report would be released harshly criticizing the electoral process here.
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NEWS
August 10, 2016
President Obama has been very critical of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's threat to arrest and send home millions of undocumented immigrants, but his administration has said little about a deplorable deportation program affecting Dominican-born Haitians, the largest stateless population in the Western Hemisphere. In 2010, the Dominican Republic amended its constitution to deny citizenship to anyone born in the country who didn't have at least one parent who was born there too. Overnight, 200,000 Dominicans of Haitian descent were stripped of citizenship.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Trenton Daniel, Associated Press
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - President Michel Martelly urged Haitians to recall the tens of thousands of people who lost their lives in a devastating earthquake three years ago, marking the disaster's anniversary Saturday with a simple ceremony. Martelly also thanked other countries and international organizations for their help after the Jan. 12, 2010, disaster. "Haitian people, hand in hand, we remember what has gone," Martelly said as a gigantic Haitian flag flew at half-staff before him on the front lawn of the former National Palace, a pile of tangled steel reinforcement bars nearby.
NEWS
October 23, 2012 | By Trenton Daniel, Associated Press
CARACOL, Haiti - Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton encouraged foreigners to invest in Haiti as she and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, led a star-studded delegation gathered Monday to inaugurate a new industrial park at the center of U.S. efforts to help the country rebuild after the 2010 earthquake. Actors Sean Penn and Ben Stiller, fashion designer Donna Karan, and British business magnate Richard Branson were among the luminaries at the opening of the new Caracol Industrial Park, projected to create thousands of jobs more than 100 miles from the quake-ravaged capital of Port-au-Prince.
NEWS
January 22, 2011
Former dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier should have never returned to Haiti. But since he did, he should be tried for his murderous regime's killings and robbery of the state treasury. Duvalier showed up unexpectedly Sunday in Haiti after secretly departing France, where he has been in exile since 1986. Neither the French nor U.S. governments knew of Duvalier's travel plans. Haitian officials initially did not know how to react, but police Tuesday took Duvalier from his hotel for questioning.
NEWS
January 22, 2010
A PICTURE OF Haiti's most despicable looter flashed onto our TV screens Wednesday night. It was enough to make you gag on your dinner. I recognized him right away. He wasn't one of those wild-eyed Haitians traveling in what the media are calling "roving bands of scavenging looters" or "machete-wielding gangs of looters. " Those pillaging marauders seen hauling away food, mattresses and anything else they can lay siege to have a frantic and desperate look about them. Whether polite society can relate to them or not, they are in a life and death struggle in a land where the rule of law no longer prevails.
NEWS
January 21, 2010 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
JIMANI, Dominican Republic - Dressed in scrubs and a red kerchief, Angela Guerrera crouched over the 69-year-old Haitian woman. She plucked at the filthy bandage and revealed the damage caused more than a week earlier by the collapse of a concrete wall: The left foot was severely flattened from toes to instep. The patient, Orana Soliman, had been airlifted yesterday from Port-au-Prince to this medical outpost, where Guerrera and her 18 colleagues from Cooper University Hospital spent the day tending to Haiti's wounded and desperate.
NEWS
January 20, 2010 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
JIMANI, Dominican Republic - Dressed in scrubs and a red kerchief, Angela Guerrera crouched over the 69-year-old Haitian grandmother. She plucked at the filthy bandage and revealed the damage caused more than a week earlier by the collapse of a concrete wall: The left foot was severely flattened from toes to instep. The patient, Orana Soliman, had been airlifted today from Port au Prince to this medical outpost, where Guerrera and her 18 colleagues from Cooper University Hospital spent the day tending to Haiti's wounded and desperate refugees.
NEWS
March 2, 2004 | By Acel Moore
With his country convulsed by political upheaval and threats from armed rebels and hoodlums, Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide resigned and fled Sunday morning. His departure signaled yet another coup in Haiti's long history of violent takeovers - and also symbolized the long and often tortured ties between the island nation and the United States. Aristide's failure is his own. He simply never was able to extend the law and democracy throughout the tiny nation, and I won't make excuses for his failures.
NEWS
June 28, 1995 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Late Friday, as Haitian candidates were winding down their ragtag campaigns for a host of parliamentary and local offices, an American organization was busy working the hotel lobbies here in a different kind of campaign. A representative of the International Republican Institute (IRI), a private organization with ties to the U.S. Republican Party, was lining up American reporters for a news conference the next day, where a slick 300-page report would be released harshly criticizing the electoral process here.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | By Marjorie Valbrun, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 10,000 candidates are running, from 60 parties, for everything from village council to the national senate. The campaigning - other than scattered radio ads, a handful of rallies and one particularly raucous televised debate - didn't really begin until late last week. Yet for all the admitted confusion, today's elections in Haiti are a defining moment, one that people hope will put the finishing touches on a long struggle to return democracy to their politically battered country.
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