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NEWS
August 30, 2001 | By Jacob Quinn Sanders INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Half.com, a Plymouth Meeting-based Internet person-to-person thrift store owned by the auction Web site eBay.com, announced recently it would begin selling used college textbooks through the student center portion of its Web site. With a bank of 5 million volumes, Half.com hopes to appeal to college students, who spend an average of more than $60 per book, according to the National Association of College Stores. The site features a searchable title index and books organized by subject.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Half.com, an upstart Conshohocken e-commerce company that lists used books, CDs, video games and movies for sale, is being acquired by online auction giant eBay Inc. in a stock deal valued yesterday at more than $312 million. Meg Whitman, eBay's president and chief executive officer, and Joshua Kopelman, founder and president of privately held Half.com, announced the deal in a conference call after the stock market closed. Under terms of the agreement, Half.com - which was launched Jan. 19 - would become an independent subsidiary of eBay.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a busy and heady week for the Internet start-up Half.com. Last Wednesday morning, the Conshohocken-based company launched its e-commerce site that company officials call a "person-to-person marketplace" offering used and remaindered books, CDs, movies and video games for at least half price. Later that morning, Half.com's 28-year-old founder Joshua Kopelman was interviewed by Katie Couric on the Today Show. That night, the city council of Halfway, Ore., (pop.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joshua Kopelman knew his upstart online marketplace, Half.com, was a winner last year when members of his own family fell into competition to see who could sell the most used books and music on the Web site. As the site - where customers buy and sell used goods at not more than half of their original prices - opened last Jan. 19, Kopelman's wife, Rena, started selling her old CDs. His father began scouring yard sales for old tomes to sell. His mother-in-law did the same. By last week, the three had sold 380 items, Kopelman said.
NEWS
December 20, 1999 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
A Conshohocken Internet start-up is hoping to create a marketing sensation by persuading an Oregon town to adopt the company name. The timber-and-cattle town of Halfway, population 306, is considering changing it's name to Half.com for the year 2000 in return for help jumpstarting its sagging economy. Town leaders and company executives are excited about the venture. But many town residents still don't know about the proposal. Once word spreads, the town will be in upheaval, some residents feel.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's that noise around Mark Hughes? It must be the buzz. Hughes aims to get people chattering. While working for Half.com, a Web marketplace founded in the Philadelphia area, Hughes pioneered advertising in fortune cookies. He engineered a publicity stunt to change an Oregon town's name to Half.com. He put advertisements in New York City urinals and on the hubcaps of Boston taxis. Buzz buzz. Now, with his own company, Buzzmarketing, the Swarthmore resident wants to sell other companies on the merits of fortune-cookie ads and other oddball attention-getters.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1999 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it came time to get on the Internet, Halfway, Ore., was not about to go halfway. Halfway, population 306, has agreed to change its name to Half.com, at the request of a Conshohocken Internet start-up. "Oh, yeah. We're going all the way," Mayor Dick Crow said. Halfway's seven-member City Council on Thursday night voted unanimously to rename the town Half.com. The marketing ploy was dreamed up by executives of Half.com, which plans to launch a consumer Internet site in mid-January.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Half.com., the Internet start-up that made international headlines last month by urging Halfway, Ore., to rename itself Half.com, today will launch the e-commerce site behind the marketing ploy. Joshua Kopelman, chief executive officer of the Conshohocken-based company, described Half.com as a "person-to-person marketplace" that will offer used or remaindered books, CDs, movies and video games - for half price. He believes that the site - http://www.half.com - will function as an online classified advertising section or a virtual garage sale.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's young. He's rich. And he's a little bit worn out. So Internet whiz kid Joshua Kopelman said yesterday that it's time for a break. Come April 15, he'll be leaving Half.com, the online business he launched in 2000 and later sold to auction giant eBay Inc. "I've been on a treadmill for quite some time," Kopelman, 32, said. "I started my first business in college. The day of graduation, I went to a business meeting. . . . It's the right time to take some time off and spend time with my family.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | by Paul Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's how the Internet has shifted the power structure in today's business world: Josh Kopelman, 28, starts a small Internet company in Conshohocken last summer called half.com. Straight out of the Donald Trump handbook, Kopelman contacts the town of Halfway, Ore. with an offer officials cannot refuse: Rename the town half.com, Ore., for one year in return for some free computers. The mayor of Halfway agrees. Half.com (population 360) gets a ton of national and international publicity, including ABC News, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the London Times.
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NEWS
March 22, 2013
SERIAL entrepreneur Josh Kopelman knows a thing or two about disruption. Kopelman, 41, of Gladwyne, is managing director of First Round Capital, a seed-stage venture-capital fund he formed in 2004. The Wharton grad made a name for himself before that. In 1999, he founded half.com, an online marketplace for used books, music and videos. It was sold to eBay in 2000 for $350 million. Half.com was Kopelman's "secret," something that everybody thought was crazy, but he believed would fundamentally redefine an industry.
NEWS
August 24, 2012
The reasons for Philadelphia's distant also-ran finish in the first 30 years of America's tech boom are numerous and complicated, but two stand out: 1) the city's anemic entrepreneurial culture; 2) a tax structure that's been outright hostile to start-ups and the investors who fund them. But with the news last week that the hotshot investment firm First Round Capital was moving to Philadelphia, there's reason to hope the city need not be shut out of the economy-goosing tech sector forever.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the handful of venture-capital firms based in Philadelphia's leafy suburbs, First Round Capital stands out for its national reach and its rapid pace - more than a deal a week. Now it's moving downtown. Josh Kopelman , a 1993 graduate of Penn's Wharton School, started venture-backed Infonautics (he took it public in the dot.com boom), auctioneer Half.com (now part of eBay ), and security firm TurnTide (sold to Symantec ) before setting up First Round with Penn computer-scientist-turned-investor Howard Morgan in 2004.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2003 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's young. He's rich. And he's a little bit worn out. So Internet whiz kid Joshua Kopelman said yesterday that it's time for a break. Come April 15, he'll be leaving Half.com, the online business he launched in 2000 and later sold to auction giant eBay Inc. "I've been on a treadmill for quite some time," Kopelman, 32, said. "I started my first business in college. The day of graduation, I went to a business meeting. . . . It's the right time to take some time off and spend time with my family.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2003 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's that noise around Mark Hughes? It must be the buzz. Hughes aims to get people chattering. While working for Half.com, a Web marketplace founded in the Philadelphia area, Hughes pioneered advertising in fortune cookies. He engineered a publicity stunt to change an Oregon town's name to Half.com. He put advertisements in New York City urinals and on the hubcaps of Boston taxis. Buzz buzz. Now, with his own company, Buzzmarketing, the Swarthmore resident wants to sell other companies on the merits of fortune-cookie ads and other oddball attention-getters.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Web retailer that once persuaded an Oregon town to change its name to Half.com is about to see its own name wiped off the map. Half.com, the popular used-goods peddler with headquarters in Plymouth Meeting, was absorbed into its parent, Silicon Valley-based EBay Inc., yesterday. As a result, over the next six months, the Half.com brand name will gradually disappear from the Web, company officials said. EBay announced 18 layoffs and 28 job relocations at Half.com in connection with the changes.
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | By Jacob Quinn Sanders INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Half.com, a Plymouth Meeting-based Internet person-to-person thrift store owned by the auction Web site eBay.com, announced recently it would begin selling used college textbooks through the student center portion of its Web site. With a bank of 5 million volumes, Half.com hopes to appeal to college students, who spend an average of more than $60 per book, according to the National Association of College Stores. The site features a searchable title index and books organized by subject.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2001 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joshua Kopelman knew his upstart online marketplace, Half.com, was a winner last year when members of his own family fell into competition to see who could sell the most used books and music on the Web site. As the site - where customers buy and sell used goods at not more than half of their original prices - opened last Jan. 19, Kopelman's wife, Rena, started selling her old CDs. His father began scouring yard sales for old tomes to sell. His mother-in-law did the same. By last week, the three had sold 380 items, Kopelman said.
NEWS
June 15, 2000
On Jan. 19, Joshua Kopelman of Conshohocken started up a new business. On Wednesday, the 29-year-old sold it to eBay Inc., the online auctioneer, for $312 million-plus in eBay stock. So the independent lifespan of Mr. Kopelman's business, Half.com, was 148 days. In a sclerotic old-style corporation, 148 days would be how long it would take a 29-year-old with a good idea to get a meeting with his boss' boss. Therein lies an intoxicating appeal of Internet e-commerce: It can dramatically shorten the distance between having an idea and giving it a fair trial, sharply lessen how much persuading of the hidebound or building of infrastructure an impatient entrepreneur has to endure.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2000 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Half.com, an upstart Conshohocken e-commerce company that lists used books, CDs, video games and movies for sale, is being acquired by online auction giant eBay Inc. in a stock deal valued yesterday at more than $312 million. Meg Whitman, eBay's president and chief executive officer, and Joshua Kopelman, founder and president of privately held Half.com, announced the deal in a conference call after the stock market closed. Under terms of the agreement, Half.com - which was launched Jan. 19 - would become an independent subsidiary of eBay.
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