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Halley

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NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
During the next week, sky watchers in the Philadelphia area will have their last opportunity for at least six weeks to view Halley's comet as it approaches the sun and moves slowly out of view. Derek Pitts, an astronomer at the Franklin Institute, said that so far, many observers unfamiliar with the night sky have had difficulty spotting the comet because it has been so dim. "It's been very tough to see, and it will become increasingly difficult every day during the next week," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Nature received terrible reviews for its mishandling of the return of Halley's comet. Lack of practice, many believed. The event nevertheless induced Morton Subotnick to compose a major work, Return, in celebration, and the piece is available on record (New Albion 010). Subotnick is the emblem of electronic musical activity and is the only composer to have won a Pulitzer Prize for a computer-generated score. This new work, 44 minutes long, attempts to portray all time since the Spirit hovered over the waters, gradually becoming musically specific for the recent sightings of the comet.
NEWS
January 5, 1986 | By Jay Clarke, Special to The Inquirer
With Halley's comet growing brighter each day, comet fever is heating up in southern Florida, the best place in the continental United States from which to see the celebrated celestial visitor. Comet festivals, tours to good viewing spots, planetarium shows, star parties, special flights and cruises are some of the comet-oriented activities being offered to visitors this winter. Some are already under way, and the pace will quicken as the best viewing time approaches in late March and early April.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Staff Writer
KAPOLEI, Hawaii - During his 12 seasons as the Eagles' placekicker, David Akers has been a frequent, if not weekly, visitor to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and he has learned one truth. As a parent, the last place you ever want to be with your child is the oncology floor. The cancer-stricken children there are like "warriors," Akers said. The parents, stronger than he could ever be. Yet on the Friday before the Eagles faced Green Bay in the playoffs three weeks ago, Akers was at Children's with his 6-year-old daughter, Halley, snaking through a course of tests that led them, unexpectedly, to the oncology floor.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Astronomers have discovered a new comet that may rival the brightest stars in the sky when it passes near Earth next month. If comet Hyakutaki, as it's called, lives up to expectations, it will put on a far better show than the famous Halley's comet did when it appeared as a faint smudge 10 years ago. The new comet is named after Yuji Hyakutaki, an amateur Japanese astronomer who first spotted the object using large binoculars on Jan. 30....
NEWS
March 19, 1986 | BY DONALD KAUL
My second-favorite picture of the week was of Halley's comet streaking through the skies, the one that newspapers throughout the country ran on their front pages to illustrate the success of the Soviet spacecraft Vega I. The visit of Halley's comet has been something of a disappointment to most of us. If we've seen it at all, it's been as a gray smudge just above the horizon. But this was a dynamite picture, revealing Halley's to be everything a comet should be. The photo's only real flaw, if it could be called that, is that it was taken in 1910 at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz.
NEWS
April 16, 1986
I don't remember how young I was when I first heard of Halley's comet, but I remember the story. My grandmother, Helen Brady, told me that when she was a young girl she heard that the world was about to end one night at 6 p.m. So she and her sisters went out and sat on the front step of their Philadelphia rowhouse, in Society Hill, and watched the sky and waited for the world to end. That was a common thought in 1910. There were many who believed the comet, which passed closer to the Earth that year than it has this time, would send poison gas and spell the end of the world.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ada Kessler has the ultimate word on Halley's comet: The 1986 version doesn't hold a candle to the one in 1910. Kessler, 89, who has seen the comet twice in her life, said that this year it was "just a fuzzy blur. " A retired teacher and avid traveler, Kessler had planned to visit Australia to see the comet for the second time, but on the advice of her travel agent visited Chile instead, returning last week. Seventy-six years ago, the last time Halley's appeared, Kessler, then a teenager, watched the comet every night from the porch of her family's home on Lancaster Avenue in Malvern.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ed Kaczanowicz, seeing Halley's comet, perched in the pre-dawn southeastern sky near Saturn, Mars and the constellation Sagittarius, was nothing compared to seeing the hundreds of people lined up outside his mini- observatory in Upper Dublin Township. "The crowd is a bigger spectacle here than the comet," said Kaczanowicz, a research technician for the physics department at Temple University's Ambler campus. He was charged with the difficult task of giving everyone in line a quick glimpse of the comet.
NEWS
March 11, 1986
If the only gauge of U.S.-Soviet relations was the rhetoric emanating from Washington and Moscow these days, any reasonable person would have cause for despair. Yet behind the scenes, the two nations have joined to share in one of the major scientific events of the century: a close-up examination of Halley's comet. American scientific equipment is onboard the Soviet Vega spacecraft that on Sunday passed within 5,000 miles of the huge comet. A dust analyzer designed by a University of Chicago scientist is one of the main instruments on Vega, there at the invitation of Soviet scientists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
SOME PEOPLE, like Andrea Green, never fully grow up. Lucky for her - and for the thousands of others (young and young in spirit) who've been touched by Green's work as a Philadelphia-based music therapist and composer of acclaimed, bighearted children's musicals. Green's organic works aren't just toe-tapping good - chock-full of polished, pop/Broadway-style anthems that get you humming along. These nourishing shows are also good for you - as socially inclusive, thought-provoking and therapeutic as they are entertaining.
NEWS
January 30, 2011 | By Ashley Fox, Inquirer Staff Writer
KAPOLEI, Hawaii - During his 12 seasons as the Eagles' placekicker, David Akers has been a frequent, if not weekly, visitor to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and he has learned one truth. As a parent, the last place you ever want to be with your child is the oncology floor. The cancer-stricken children there are like "warriors," Akers said. The parents, stronger than he could ever be. Yet on the Friday before the Eagles faced Green Bay in the playoffs three weeks ago, Akers was at Children's with his 6-year-old daughter, Halley, snaking through a course of tests that led them, unexpectedly, to the oncology floor.
NEWS
June 30, 2005 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eighty-three million miles from here, a NASA spacecraft is closing in for the first real-life attack on a heavenly body - a comet called Tempel-1. On Monday, the spacecraft will send an 800-pound projectile smashing into the comet to expose whatever is inside. The Hubble and two other space-based telescopes and countless observatories on the ground will be focused on tiny Tempel-1 during the impact, planned for 1:52 a.m. Philadelphia time. "We don't know what's going to happen," said Jack Brandt, a comet expert from the University of New Mexico.
LIVING
October 20, 1997 | By Dick Ahlstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the quest to explore space, earthlings have landed on the moon, brought a mechanical rover down on Mars and last week launched Cassini, slated for a visit to a Saturn moon. Coming next will be a coup of a different sort: pulling up to a comet and dropping a robot lander on its dirt-and-ice surface. It will be like trying to launch a flea into orbit around a passing bullet. Putting a satellite into position next to a speeding comet will push space technology to its limits, according to Gerhard Schwehm, the project scientist for the mission, being planned for launch in 2003 by the European Space Agency.
LIVING
May 16, 1996 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The rehearsals were done, the performances over. The songs were sung one last time yesterday, and then the cast of The Return of Halley's Comet embraced one another. Fin Vuong hugged and patted the back of her partner on stage, Anne Blood, whose eyes were red. Jesse Gemberling-Johnson held a gift, a painting from his partner, Andrew Wyatt, and sobbed. Everyone was hugging Joey Schmidt or shaking his hand. This was not the cast party of just any theater troupe. No, this was the annual goodbye to one of the more remarkable theatrical-scholastic events of the local season - the musical production put on jointly earlier this month by the HMS School for Children With Cerebral Palsy and the Germantown Friends School.
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Out in space, a comet is hurtling toward us at 65,000 miles per hour. It will miss Earth by nine million miles - a hair in the vastness of space - but could provide a light show in the night sky. The finding, announced last week, comes amid a spate of recent discoveries about the universe. But the new comet has a particular attraction: We might be able to see it. Not only that, its very discovery did not depend on the sort of high-priced technology that spotted a galaxy 14 billion light-years out or found hints that the smallest-known particles of matter may contain smaller parts still.
NEWS
February 8, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Astronomers have discovered a new comet that may rival the brightest stars in the sky when it passes near Earth next month. If comet Hyakutaki, as it's called, lives up to expectations, it will put on a far better show than the famous Halley's comet did when it appeared as a faint smudge 10 years ago. The new comet is named after Yuji Hyakutaki, an amateur Japanese astronomer who first spotted the object using large binoculars on Jan. 30....
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | By Ronda Sharpe, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see the Shoemaker-Levy comet brought more than 100 people to Washington Crossing State Park on Sunday night for a stargazing party. The park, usually the site of family picnics and historical re-enactments, was chosen for the first time as the site for the annual star-watching party given by the Philadelphia Franklin Institute because "it's a good, dark sky location - no city lights," said Derrick Pitts, vice president and director of the Fels Planetarium/Tuttleman Omniverse Theater of the Franklin Institute.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
Joe Laufer collects events the way kids collect baseball cards. A self-described "events fan," he traveled to Gettysburg in 1963 for the 100th anniversary of the Civil War battle. Years later, he took his family to Independence Hall in Philadelphia on July 4, 1976, for celebrations there. And in 1986, he journeyed to the Statue of Liberty for the centennial celebration of the statue. Now the Vincentown resident no longer collects events by attending them. He organizes them.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1986 | By KIRK HONEYCUTT, Los Angeles Daily News
Choke Canyon" is a series of stunts in search of a movie. A biplane lands on a bus. A helicopter piggybacks on a truck. A man grabs hold of the undercarriage of a moving jeep and loosens the front axle. Other stunts involve animals, explosives, falls and fistfights. Writers Sheila Goldberg, Ovidio G. Assonitis and Alfonso Brescia have the thankless task of trying to write a movie around all this action. Not surprisingly, they fail. The story lurches ahead on a predetermined course, not letting logic or plot considerations stand in the way. In the opening scene, Stephen Collins, playing a physicist conducting solitary research in the wilds of Choke Canyon, complains about lack of research money.
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