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Hallucinations

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NEWS
September 25, 1986 | By Donna Shaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hallucinations and "bizarre feelings" can be side effects of a pain reliever administered by Main Line neurosurgeon Samuel S. Lyness to a 17-year- old patient who later accused him of sexual assault, experts testified yesterday before a state medical-board examiner. Speaking in Norristown before Louis Seltzer, a hearing examiner for the state Board of Medical Education and Licensure, one defense witness also said that the drug, Talwin, sometimes caused sexual hallucinations, particularly in younger patients.
NEWS
September 28, 1996 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
Shortly after an 82-count federal indictment accused him of stealing $3.5 million, Foundation for New Era Philanthropy president John G. Bennett Jr., said he suffers from hallucinations and is receiving psychiatric care. Bennett, 59, didn't raise mental incompetence as a reason why he shouldn't be tried, as John E. du Pont did successfully earlier this week. But Odell Guyton, Bennett's lawyer, said one psychiatrist Bennett is consulting, Dr. Robert Sadoff, also is one of du Pont's doctors.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | Reviewed by Lawrence W. Brown
Hallucinations By Oliver Sacks Alfred A. Knopf. 352 pp. $26.95 --- Popular science becomes more intense, more engaging, and more profound when provided by a true expert. It is rare, indeed, when such an expert is also a talented writer. Psychiatrist and neurologist Oliver Sacks is that unique scientific raconteur, with a spellbinding gift for recording the experiences of his own patients and collecting remarkable personal anecdotes from colleagues, correspondents, and the literature.
NEWS
May 27, 2011
POTTSVILLE, Pa. - An emergency injunction against the sale of the synthetic drug known as bath salts has been issued in a fifth Pennsylvania county. Schuylkill County Court Judge Jacqueline Russell issued the injunction Wednesday banning four stores from selling the chemicals. The drugs can cause extreme paranoia and hallucinations. They can be purchased for as little as $10 at some gas stations and smoke shops as well as online. Injunctions have also been issued in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Centre, and Columbia Counties.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
The titles of many of Oliver Sacks' books - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat , Seeing Voices and Musicophilia - sound like they're more likely to be found on the Magical Mystery Tour bus than in your library's nonfiction section. In his latest trek through the peculiar landscape of the brain, Hallucinations , now out on paperback, the acclaimed neurologist explores hallucinations - those he's had, those others have had and why they matter. Sacks speaks at the Free Library on Monday and hopes to get to the nearby Mutter Museum, an old favorite "which I hope has resisted attempts to modernize and sanitize," he said.
NEWS
July 12, 1990 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Convicted murderer Joseph L. Young was suffering from hallucinations and delusions that directed him to kill two Islamic scholars in 1986, three mental-health experts testified at his sentencing hearing yesterday. Young, also known as Yusef Ali, had the ability to lie but was "not smart enough to develop the intricacies" of a mental-illness defense, according to Robert L. Sadoff, a psychiatrist testifying on Young's behalf in Montgomery County Court. Sadoff and the two other expert witnesses described Young's condition as "paranoid psychosis.
NEWS
March 19, 1996 | by Kitty Caparella, Daily News Staff Writer
Mob witnesses who testify for the government are often accused by defense lawyers of hallucinating. Now, there's a star government witness whose hallucinating is certified. The colorful world of Rosario Conti Bellocchi, 27, continues to unfold in one surprise after another. The latest revelation is that the Sicilian native has a history of psychiatric problems: hallucinations, depression, acute anxiety and psychopathology, according to Italian hospital records reviewed by the Daily News.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Glenn Alton Barhight, a Croydon man who was convicted of stealing an empty SEPTA bus and injuring 16 people during a joy ride through four counties, has been sentenced to 10 to 20 years in a state mental hospital. Montgomery County Judge S. Gerald Corso last week also ordered Barhight, 37, of Main Street, to serve 10 years' probation after his release. Barhight faced a maximum sentence of 47 1/2 to 95 years in prison after he was found guilty but mentally ill on May 24 of three counts of aggravated assault, eight counts of simple assault, two counts of reckless endangerment and one count of theft by receiving stolen property.
LIVING
March 31, 1997 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Scientists are increasingly finding that mental disorders may only be malfunctions of the physical brain, much like a broken ankle, and, perhaps, equally curable. The brain is highly specialized, and mental maladies are rooted in specific areas of the brain. Anxiety disorders may affect areas of the brain that govern emotion; schizophrenia, areas that govern hearing and sight. "By knowing where in the brain things may go wrong in mental disorders, we can target rationally designed treatments," said Steven Hyman, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
In the government psychiatrist's view, Jack Bennett is quite normal - mentally speaking, that is. Bennett, the Philadelphia fund-raiser accused of masterminding a $130 million charity fraud, has no mental impairment, contrary to what Bennett's own doctors have reported, according to testimony yesterday by Dr. Park Dietz. And, because Bennett's been caught in too many lies, he can't even be considered "a religious zealot," Dietz told U.S. District Judge Edmund V. Ludwig, attempting to undercut another defense claim.
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NEWS
July 22, 2013
The titles of many of Oliver Sacks' books - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat , Seeing Voices and Musicophilia - sound like they're more likely to be found on the Magical Mystery Tour bus than in your library's nonfiction section. In his latest trek through the peculiar landscape of the brain, Hallucinations , now out on paperback, the acclaimed neurologist explores hallucinations - those he's had, those others have had and why they matter. Sacks speaks at the Free Library on Monday and hopes to get to the nearby Mutter Museum, an old favorite "which I hope has resisted attempts to modernize and sanitize," he said.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
By Ann Connor Parkinson's is a chronic, progressive neurological disease. It is hard to live with, yet there are far worse diseases to have. Nevertheless, since April is Parkinson's Awareness Month, let's, for a few paragraphs, shine a bright light on the dark, sobering realities of this disease. Some of the questions your neurologist asks while Parkinson's is in its early stages pull the curtain back on what's ahead: Can you dress yourself? Do you drool excessively? Only at night or during the day?
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | Reviewed by Lawrence W. Brown
Hallucinations By Oliver Sacks Alfred A. Knopf. 352 pp. $26.95 --- Popular science becomes more intense, more engaging, and more profound when provided by a true expert. It is rare, indeed, when such an expert is also a talented writer. Psychiatrist and neurologist Oliver Sacks is that unique scientific raconteur, with a spellbinding gift for recording the experiences of his own patients and collecting remarkable personal anecdotes from colleagues, correspondents, and the literature.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those still suffering burnout from all those excessive-heat warnings might find the following a refreshing change. Deep in the heart of August, Accu-Weather Inc. is calling for a snowy winter along the I-95 corridor and throughout the Mid-Atlantic. "The I-95 cities could get hit pretty good," said meteorologist Paul Pastelok. The company sees above normal snowfall in the populations centers from Washington to Boston, places where people still might be digging out from this summer's air-conditioning bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
There are so many truly fascinating ideas floating around InterAct Theatre's world premiere of Kara Lee Corthron's drama Etched in Skin on a Sunlit Night , it's a wonder she managed to cram them all into the same play. Then again, there's a big difference between cramming and finessing. For starters, Jules (Phyllis Johnson), an African American painter living in Iceland, married to Ólafur (Ian Bedford), an investment banker and native, harbors a dark, secret past. She also receives hallucinatory visitations from Jónsi (Jered McLenigan)
NEWS
May 27, 2011
POTTSVILLE, Pa. - An emergency injunction against the sale of the synthetic drug known as bath salts has been issued in a fifth Pennsylvania county. Schuylkill County Court Judge Jacqueline Russell issued the injunction Wednesday banning four stores from selling the chemicals. The drugs can cause extreme paranoia and hallucinations. They can be purchased for as little as $10 at some gas stations and smoke shops as well as online. Injunctions have also been issued in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Centre, and Columbia Counties.
NEWS
May 5, 2011
NEW HAVEN, Conn. - A 5-year-old Connecticut girl was hospitalized after she accidentally ingested the hallucinogenic drug PCP, New Haven police said yesterday. The child ate noodles prepared by a relative Monday in the same pot that her mother, Hope Brodie, 26, used the day before to mix the the illegal drug with marijuana, police said. Brodie has been charged with risk of injury to a minor. The New Haven Register reported that after she ate the noodles, the child became hyperactive and distracted and began pointing to her face, saying that she had four noses.
NEWS
May 24, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Jack Sparrow is at the wheel, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End scores as the joyride of joyrides. But ultimately the voyage is so choppy and long (2 hours, 48 minutes) that into the third hour I found myself yawning, "Yo-ho-hum and a very sore bum. " The three-quel is an improvement over the soggy, sorry, second installment of POTC. For one thing, Geoffrey Rush returns as Capt. Barbossa. As he verbally spars with the pixilated Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp), you would think that with their poetic cadences, upthrust chins and rascally swaggers they were playing Shakespeare.
NEWS
May 24, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
When Jack Sparrow is at the wheel, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End scores as the joyride of joyrides. But ultimately the voyage is so choppy and long (2 hours, 48 minutes) that into the third hour I found myself yawning, "Yo-ho-hum and a very sore bum. " The three-quel is an improvement over the soggy, sorry, second installment of POTC . For one thing, Geoffrey Rush returns as Capt. Barbossa. As he verbally spars with the pixilated Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp), you would think that with their poetic cadences, upthrust chins and rascally swaggers they were playing Shakespeare.
NEWS
November 1, 2006 | By BONNIE SQUIRES
ITHOUGHT I was finished writing about negative politics. But then Rush Limbaugh opened his big mouth and attacked one of my heroes, Michael J. Fox, who has Parkinson's. You've probably seen the political ads Fox has made for several candidates who support stem-cell research in ways opposed by the Bush administration and the GOP Congress, putting the United States way behind other countries in this area of science and progress. And we all remember his interview with Katie Couric where his arms and legs flailed so violently that he lost his microphone.
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