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LIVING
April 2, 1998 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Titanic, Oscar champ and ruler of box office and billboard charts, is now steaming into fashion. Those lush, sweeping clothes worn by what were surely the most glamorous passengers to ever go down with a ship are all over the runways as the U.S. designer fall previews pick up steam. Designers from Hollywood's Richard Tyler to all-American Ralph Lauren are proposing that women go deluxe, wrap themselves in rich fabrics and swathe their bodies in luxurious coats, dresses and skirts.
LIVING
November 10, 1997 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Donna Karan and Isaac Mizrahi, two creative visionaries, appear to be the guiding lights of fashion's next millennium. Other U.S. designers bombed last week with forward, edgy collections too revolutionary for today's women. Karan and Mizrahi, however, closed the U.S. spring designer previews with masterful, evolutionary collections, pushing fashion forward one easily acceptable step at a time. A new star did emerge last week - Randolph Duke. His second collection for the resurrected Halston company was haute, haute, haute.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
No, the Martha Graham Ensemble - as the troupe that performed Monday at the Annenberg Center is called - is not the Graham company. It is the next best thing, though. It is made of advanced students now attending Graham's school in New York. The caliber of dancing was high enough to give one pause in calling them students; in fact, the majority of the 12 dancers would probably be with one professional troupe or another were their eyes not set on joining the main Graham company. The repertory was well suited to not yet fully matured Graham dancers.
LIVING
February 6, 2000 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, FOR THE INQUIRER
Fashion designer Ralph Rucci favors books on physics over fashion magazines and draws inspiration from such things as DNA molecules. But then Rucci is no quick study. Neither are his clothes. Perhaps it is fitting that he named his ready-to-wear collection Chado, after the word for the Japanese tea ceremony, a process involving 331 steps. It's a word symbolic of the painstaking care the Seventh Avenue veteran takes in designing and making each garment that goes out his door. Rucci, born in South Philadelphia 42 years ago, is just weeks from his fall 2000 runway show in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The souls of old clothes speak to Johnny Columbo. Delicate 1920s day dresses fashioned from silk velvets and Battenburg lace whisper, "Restore me. " Smart 1960s sheaths say, "Display me," and so an ocean-blue, jewel-collared Halston frock hangs on an open door. "They just draw me in," said Columbo, who owns The Philadelphia Vintage and Consignment Shoppe on 12th Street near Sansom. "I go back in time with all of my garments. " In an era where stylists and their clients are hot to comb through vintage shops for Old World, one-of-a-kind fashion, Columbo has established himself as one of the industry's go-to guys.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Fashion Writer
When the worlds of Hollywood and fashion collide, look out. The titans of tinsel town and the sages of Seventh Avenue gathered Monday night for the 10th annual Council of Fashion Designers of America Awards and dinner - and, true to form, the affair rivaled the Oscars and the Emmy ceremonies for pure glitz. But unlike those annual spectacles, the CFDA awards presentation was not marred by overly long dance numbers and acceptance speeches or foolish presenter banter. Instead, it was a sparkling evening of seemingly genuine emotion made even more exciting by the presenters, including Liza Minnelli, Bill Blass, Oscar de la Renta, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Joan Rivers.
LIVING
February 14, 2000 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The popularity of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire and its imitators may have sent a questionable message to the fashion arena. Designers' collective vision seems to be stuck on the world of the wealthy who have no qualms about showing it off. The American runway shows here last week were dominated by the posh status symbols of furs (mostly real, some faux), gold and silver metallics, and glittering embroidery. These shows are the first indication of how things could go in the coming century.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
When Sex and the City debuted on HBO in 1998, I was in my early 20s. I didn't relate. But then 30 happened, I got a better job, and I upgraded my technology. A lot of my close girlfriends - including my younger sister - were married, and I found myself still dating. (Big sigh here.) I was a columnist. I had great clothes, but with every new relationship I heard the painful you-should-be-coupled-up-by-now refrain in my head. Suddenly Charlotte, Samantha, Carrie, and especially Miranda, were my girls.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The world is awash in red hearts and red roses for Valentine's Day. Which makes today the perfect time to launch "Red," an exhibit at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. (It is especially appropriate, too, because this year Valentine's Day falls during Fashion Week, when America's designers unveil their fall collections in the nation's fashion capital.) With its overtones of romance and glamour, danger and seduction, the color red has long been close to the hearts of fashion designers as well as lovers.
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NEWS
March 9, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
It's dainty when parked along the perimeter of a poncho and rough-and-rugged indie when it's fashioned into a leather skirt. The trendlet What else, but fringe? Designers are effusively shearing suede into thin strips and stringing teeny, tiny beads (or sometimes bold baubles) onto angel hair pasta-size twine to make the fringe snazz up our spring silhouettes. The ticklish-to-the-touch tassels are at their most modern as pendants on cleavage-grazing necklaces. Where's it come from?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The souls of old clothes speak to Johnny Columbo. Delicate 1920s day dresses fashioned from silk velvets and Battenburg lace whisper, "Restore me. " Smart 1960s sheaths say, "Display me," and so an ocean-blue, jewel-collared Halston frock hangs on an open door. "They just draw me in," said Columbo, who owns The Philadelphia Vintage and Consignment Shoppe on 12th Street near Sansom. "I go back in time with all of my garments. " In an era where stylists and their clients are hot to comb through vintage shops for Old World, one-of-a-kind fashion, Columbo has established himself as one of the industry's go-to guys.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | Associated Press
NEW YORK (AP) - Want to have a Cinderella moment without breaking the bank? If you've always wanted to wear a designer gown and jewelry and make people gawk, a growing number of businesses will indulge even your wildest Cinderella fantasy. You'll just be renting, but no one should be seen in the same outfit twice anyway. And you'll be wearing the designers' high-end lines so enjoy the savings. Maybe take it up a notch with a gaggle of paparazzi-for-hire. "Where luxury had been exclusive, the Internet has made it a commodity," says Dudley Blossom, chairman of the marketing department at LIM College, a fashion school in Manhattan.
NEWS
May 27, 2010 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
When Sex and the City debuted on HBO in 1998, I was in my early 20s. I didn't relate. But then 30 happened, I got a better job, and I upgraded my technology. A lot of my close girlfriends - including my younger sister - were married, and I found myself still dating. (Big sigh here.) I was a columnist. I had great clothes, but with every new relationship I heard the painful you-should-be-coupled-up-by-now refrain in my head. Suddenly Charlotte, Samantha, Carrie, and especially Miranda, were my girls.
NEWS
February 14, 2002 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The world is awash in red hearts and red roses for Valentine's Day. Which makes today the perfect time to launch "Red," an exhibit at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. (It is especially appropriate, too, because this year Valentine's Day falls during Fashion Week, when America's designers unveil their fall collections in the nation's fashion capital.) With its overtones of romance and glamour, danger and seduction, the color red has long been close to the hearts of fashion designers as well as lovers.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's nothing else like it on the social calendar. If the Academy Ball is the event of the year in Philadelphia, then this weekend's two-night gala preview for the opening of the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts is a bit like back-to-back balls. And guests at the sold-out, $5,000-a-person celebration tomorrow and Saturday are pulling out all the fashion stops to do justice to the Philadelphia Orchestra's glittering new home. "It's not going to get any grander than this," said Louise Reed, who chairs the board of the Pennsylvania Ballet.
LIVING
November 5, 2000 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, FOR THE INQUIRER
Betsey Johnson is more like a rock legend than a fashion designer. Emerging from a taxi clad in a T-shirt, crushed velvet skirt, maxi-length sweater and sky-high animal-print boots, with tricolor braided hair maintained by a stylist flown in periodically from London, she looks more like someone ready to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame than a Seventh Avenue mainstay. Armed with cameras, sketches and notepads ready for an autograph, a flock of neon-haired groupies greeted the designer as she arrived in Philadelphia recently as if she were, say, Madonna.
LIVING
September 3, 2000 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, FOR THE INQUIRER
Randolph Duke is sitting in a stretch limousine outside his West 39th Street showroom, surrounded by a group of women he's just met. He pauses before the questions come, smiling slyly to see who will be the first to break the ice. The wait lasts only a second. What's it like dressing the stars? Why are celebrities so thin? Tell us about dressing people for the Oscars. The women have come from Philadelphia to work out details with the designer they have chosen to honor at their "Give the Shirt Off Your Back!"
LIVING
March 26, 2000 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber, FOR THE INQUIRER
Randolph Duke calls it a very surreal, even Roman experience. There's the red carpet, all the gold. Actresses heading off into battle like modern gladiators, with pricey gowns, spiked heels, blinding jewels, hair and makeup fit to intimidate any opponent. Vera Wang thinks of it more in Greek terms. She likes to call it the Olympics of fashion. With millions of viewers to take in the high-stakes runway show they call the Academy Awards, it's no wonder the fashion designers called upon to outfit these screen gems gratis are happy to go to Herculean lengths to accommodate their goddesses.
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