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Ham Radio

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NEWS
February 22, 1990 | By Beth S. Leonard, Special to The Inquirer
Walter Faust Jr., a resident of Lansdowne, is making quite a name for himself - N3FXR to be exact. That sequence represents the "call name" that Faust, a professional photographer, uses when he pursues his hobby as an amateur or "ham" radio operator. "I got interested in ham radios while involved in the Boy Scouts as an Eagle Scout," Faust said. Faust is an active member of three amateur radio clubs: Delaware County Amateur Radio Association, Tri-State Amateur Radio Club and Marple Newtown Amateur Radio Club, where he was just elected president.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The message showed up on ham radio equipment in Rolf Jespersen's office at 10:20 on a Saturday night. No one was there to hear it. No one was there to read it. Nine minutes later, there in the office north of Phoenixville in Chester County, the equipment automatically relayed the message to a ham station in Horsham, Montgomery County. The first links of a chain, which federal officials said was to reach across the nation, had been forged. It was not just any message.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph I. Pearlstein, 45, a heart-transplant recipient who was a well-known ham-radio operator, died yesterday at Allegheny University Hospitals/Hahnemann. He lived in Northeast Philadelphia. Mr. Pearlstein received his first heart transplant in August 1988. After receiving a flu shot in 1992, his body began to reject the heart, and he received a second heart. Because of the transplant, Mr. Pearlstein was disabled and could not work. In addition to pursuing interests in photography, sports cars and firearms, he was an active member of Second Choice, a support group for heart-transplant recipients.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By Marc Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
A disastrous storm hits Bucks County, knocking down most phone and power lines. Streets are flooded. Most residents remain in their homes, cut off from outside contact. Schools and community centers become makeshift shelters. Emergency crews work tirelessly in their relief and rescue efforts. Things look bleak, but a stable backup communications network - ham radio - helps rescuers save several lives. Such a catastrophic scenario was tested last weekend in Doylestown and communities across the country by thousands of amateur radio operators.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | By William D. Smith, Special to The Inquirer
A Burlington Township ham radio operator will reach new highs thanks to a zoning board decision Wednesday night. The board granted David Johnson of Mill Lane approval to install a radio communication tower as tall as 100 feet in his back yard with a 35-foot antenna span at the top. "Amature ham radio is my hobby and I have been involved with the hobby for many years," Johnson said. Johnson told the board that he planned to install multiple antennas on the tower for increased performance.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Sydney Trent, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nick Feliccia has talked with a fisherman struggling to make ends meet in Louisiana. He's chatted with a factory worker from Germany. Once, he shot the breeze for hours with a student at the University of Colorado, who told him what he could expect as an electrical engineering major in college. But on this day in the amateur radio "shack" at Northeast High, all Feliccia was getting was static as he tried to make contact with someone - anyone. Arranged before him on a table like selections from an electronic menu were a smorgasbord of radio receivers and transmitters and transceivers, stacked one atop the other, red lights blinking.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Radio gear and laptops? Check. Hot dogs, pastries, potato chips, Twizzlers and sodas? Roger. Twenty-five ham radio operators from throughout Chester County came well prepared for their annual 24-hour Field Day competition, held recently in the basement of the county's Government Services Center on Westtown Road. The goal was simple: To contact as many other ham radio operators as possible, all over the world, in a 24-hour period. Meanwhile, clubs around North America were trying to do the same thing in the competition, which has been held since 1933.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | By Joe Clark and Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writers The Associated Press contributed to this report
The words were repeated during the evening over the ham radio frequency: "No Jamaican stations on at the moment. " But a ham radio operator in Barbados last night relayed what information he could gather about the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Gilbert. The airport at Montego Bay was closed, the man in Barbados reported to other hams listening in the Philadelphia area and elsewhere. The airport had lost its electrical power, he said. "There has been some damage to the tower.
NEWS
July 2, 1986 | By Nicole Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
"Where is that idiot from Texas?" Jack Imhof said to no one while turning the dial of his radio transmitter as if he were an expert safecracker waiting for a click. After a moment the click came, in the form of a thick Southern accent. "Ah, there he is," Imhof said with a grunt. He grasped the microphone before him, leaned forward and intoned, "This is Kilo, 2, Kilo, Echo, Delta. " "This is 22 Alpha, Northern Florida," the voice answered, correcting Imhof's original assumption.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | By Michael V. Copeland, Special to The Inquirer
The sounds were familiar: the beeping of Morse code and the crackling of radio receivers. But the setting was all wrong. Linconia Park in Trevose over the weekend didn't resemble the radio rooms seen in war films as much as a barbecue gone horribly awry. The Delaware Valley Omik Amateur Radio Club had set up operations in the park for a two-day emergency-preparedness exercise. Similar amateur radio clubs all over the country were doing the same. A 20-foot antenna was spread out over the swing set to which it was lashed.
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NEWS
October 30, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
AS HURRICANE SANDY approached the Philly region Monday afternoon, the emergency shelter at Cheltenham High School was more than ready to withstand Sandy's best punch. In addition to 100 cots, three prepared meals a day, a nurse, a mental-health professional and a generator, the shelter also has two volunteer amateur-radio operators working 12-hour shifts to provide emergency communications between the shelter and Montgomery County's Emergency Operations Center in Eagleville and the American Red Cross.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leonard Prybutok, 89, an electrician, educator, and ham radio operator who supplied communications during Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii in 1992, died of kidney failure Sunday, Nov. 27, at Atria, an assisted-living residence in Center City. Mr. Prybutok was an electrician at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for three years. Then for 20 years, he was a foreman and estimator for Peter H. Lowenthal & Co., an electrical contractor in North Wales. He was an active member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 98. In 1979, Mr. Prybutok changed careers and became a vocational education teacher at Dobbins Technical High School and then at Edison High School.
NEWS
July 3, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
On a stunning Saturday in suburbia, in a hilly park where George Washington pondered an attack on Philadelphia, the hams prepare for modern disaster. They arrive in SUVs clutching smartphones, then set up folding tables with old-school gear like generators and antennae strung up through the trees with homemade tennis-ball guns. Call them the original Geek Squad. They toil in amateur radio in the event Mother Nature - or a cyber-terrorist - pulls the plug on our precarious computer-powered, device-dependent way of life.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene C. Pressler Jr., 80, a retired bank executive and ham radio enthusiast, died of pneumonia Tuesday, Feb. 22, at Foulkeways, a retirement community in Gwynedd. Mr. Pressler graduated from Collegeville-Trappe High School and three years ago helped organize his class' 60th reunion. He attended Ursinus College. For several years, he worked for his father's firm, Pressler Employment Services in Philadelphia, before joining Continental Bank. During his 20 years at Continental, he was manager of employee relations, assistant director of personnel, and director of human resources.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Goldstein, 91, of Willingboro, a radio and communication captain during World War II who for 30 years helped upgrade X-ray technology at many Southeastern Pennsylvania hospitals, died of congestive heart failure Monday in the Masonic Home of New Jersey. Following intense, yearlong training to be an operative for the Office of Strategic Services, Mr. Goldstein, known to everyone as Bill, decided he preferred communication electronics. He had grown up building radio sets in his basement, said his daughter Dena Goldstein Sharpe.
NEWS
August 24, 2005 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eleanor Jones Hammonds, 90, of Bryn Mawr, a former tennis tournament organizer and official and ham radio operator, died of heart failure Saturday at home. For more than 25 years, Mrs. Hammonds was a referee for lawn tennis tournaments in Pennsylvania. She chaired the Middle States Tennis Association Women's Intercollegiate Championships for many years and served several terms as chairwoman of the Women's Interclub Tennis Association of Philadelphia. The Eleanor Hammonds Trophy is awarded annually to the winner of the association's tournament at the Merion Cricket Club.
NEWS
July 18, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Radio gear and laptops? Check. Hot dogs, pastries, potato chips, Twizzlers and sodas? Roger. Twenty-five ham radio operators from throughout Chester County came well prepared for their annual 24-hour Field Day competition, held recently in the basement of the county's Government Services Center on Westtown Road. The goal was simple: To contact as many other ham radio operators as possible, all over the world, in a 24-hour period. Meanwhile, clubs around North America were trying to do the same thing in the competition, which has been held since 1933.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Santa's elves, apparently, have a listening problem. "I told them I wanted 600 wooden soldiers 1 foot high," the big guy explained to 6-year-old Rikee-Lyn Sooy, "but they built 100 wooden soldiers 6 feet high. These elves are driving me crazy!" Instead of perching on Santa's lap, Rikee-Lyn listed to him through a small device in her left hand. She was patched through to the North Pole by members of the Gloucester City Amateur Radio Club, who spent their Tuesday evening giving children the opportunity share their wish lists with Santa.
NEWS
June 25, 2000 | By Martin Z. Braun, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Neal Fogliani is sitting in the "shack" at the firehouse here in front of a stereo-receiver-sized radio that occasionally crackles with static and bleeps with Morse code. Shack is ham-radio-speak for a radio room, and Fogliani, also known by his call letters N3JAH, is brimming with excitement. "I was talking to a guy in Honduras last night," said Fogliani, a systems engineer at Lockheed Martin in Moorestown. Fogliani, by his own admission, is a paper chaser - a ham radio enthusiast who delights in contacting amateur radio operators all over the world.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Frequency" is for those who thought "Field of Dreams" was OK, but needed a serial killer. It stars James Caviezel as a New York City cop who plugs in the old ham radio that belonged to his dad - dead some 20 years - and hears the voice of his father (Dennis Quaid) in the ether. Could this really be happening? It's a question both men - past and present - must face, and it's also the question "Frequency" poses to its audience. The answer, from the viewer's perspective, is a surprising yes. Director Greg Hoblit ("Fallen")
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